Speeches (Lines) for Macbeth
in "Macbeth"

Total: 146

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,138

So foul and fair a day I have not seen.

2

I,3,148

Speak, if you can: what are you?

3

I,3,171

Stay, you imperfect speakers, tell me more:
By Sinel's death I know I am thane of Glamis;...

4

I,3,183

Into the air; and what seem'd corporal melted
As breath into the wind. Would they had stay'd!

5

I,3,188

Your children shall be kings.

6

I,3,190

And thane of Cawdor too: went it not so?

7

I,3,214

The thane of Cawdor lives: why do you dress me
In borrow'd robes?

8

I,3,224

[Aside] Glamis, and thane of Cawdor!
The greatest is behind....

9

I,3,240

[Aside]. Two truths are told,
As happy prologues to the swelling act...

10

I,3,257

[Aside] If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me,
Without my stir.

11

I,3,262

[Aside] Come what come may,
Time and the hour runs through the roughest day.

12

I,3,265

Give me your favour: my dull brain was wrought
With things forgotten. Kind gentlemen, your pains...

13

I,3,273

Till then, enough. Come, friends.

14

I,4,301

The service and the loyalty I owe,
In doing it, pays itself. Your highness' part...

15

I,4,326

The rest is labour, which is not used for you:
I'll be myself the harbinger and make joyful...

16

I,4,331

[Aside] The Prince of Cumberland! that is a step
On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap,...

17

I,5,411

My dearest love,
Duncan comes here to-night.

18

I,5,414

To-morrow, as he purposes.

19

I,5,426

We will speak further.

20

I,7,474

If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well
It were done quickly: if the assassination...

21

I,7,505

Hath he ask'd for me?

22

I,7,507

We will proceed no further in this business:
He hath honour'd me of late; and I have bought...

23

I,7,523

Prithee, peace:
I dare do all that may become a man;...

24

I,7,539

If we should fail?

25

I,7,554

Bring forth men-children only;
For thy undaunted mettle should compose...

26

I,7,563

I am settled, and bend up
Each corporal agent to this terrible feat....

27

II,1,582

A friend.

28

II,1,589

Being unprepared,
Our will became the servant to defect;...

29

II,1,595

I think not of them:
Yet, when we can entreat an hour to serve,...

30

II,1,600

If you shall cleave to my consent, when 'tis,
It shall make honour for you.

31

II,1,606

Good repose the while!

32

II,1,609

Go bid thy mistress, when my drink is ready,
She strike upon the bell. Get thee to bed....

33

II,2,657

[Within] Who's there? what, ho!

34

II,2,665

I have done the deed. Didst thou not hear a noise?

35

II,2,668

When?

36

II,2,670

As I descended?

37

II,2,672

Hark!
Who lies i' the second chamber?

38

II,2,675

This is a sorry sight.

39

II,2,678

There's one did laugh in's sleep, and one cried
'Murder!'...

40

II,2,684

One cried 'God bless us!' and 'Amen' the other;
As they had seen me with these hangman's hands....

41

II,2,689

But wherefore could not I pronounce 'Amen'?
I had most need of blessing, and 'Amen'...

42

II,2,694

Methought I heard a voice cry 'Sleep no more!
Macbeth does murder sleep', the innocent sleep,...

43

II,2,701

Still it cried 'Sleep no more!' to all the house:
'Glamis hath murder'd sleep, and therefore Cawdor...

44

II,2,711

I'll go no more:
I am afraid to think what I have done;...

45

II,2,721

Whence is that knocking?
How is't with me, when every noise appals me?...

46

II,2,742

To know my deed, 'twere best not know myself.
[Knocking within]...

47

II,3,808

Good morrow, both.

48

II,3,810

Not yet.

49

II,3,813

I'll bring you to him.

50

II,3,816

The labour we delight in physics pain.
This is the door.

51

II,3,822

He does: he did appoint so.

52

II,3,831

'Twas a rough night.

53

II,3,837

[with Lennox] What's the matter.

54

II,3,842

What is 't you say? the life?

55

II,3,874

Had I but died an hour before this chance,
I had lived a blessed time; for, from this instant,...

56

II,3,882

You are, and do not know't:
The spring, the head, the fountain of your blood...

57

II,3,893

O, yet I do repent me of my fury,
That I did kill them.

58

II,3,896

Who can be wise, amazed, temperate and furious,
Loyal and neutral, in a moment? No man:...

59

II,3,929

Let's briefly put on manly readiness,
And meet i' the hall together.

60

III,1,1014

Here's our chief guest.

61

III,1,1018

To-night we hold a solemn supper sir,
And I'll request your presence.

62

III,1,1024

Ride you this afternoon?

63

III,1,1026

We should have else desired your good advice,
Which still hath been both grave and prosperous,...

64

III,1,1034

Fail not our feast.

65

III,1,1036

We hear, our bloody cousins are bestow'd
In England and in Ireland, not confessing...

66

III,1,1044

I wish your horses swift and sure of foot;
And so I do commend you to their backs. Farewell....

67

III,1,1055

Bring them before us.
[Exit Attendant]...

68

III,1,1087

Well then, now
Have you consider'd of my speeches? Know...

69

III,1,1099

I did so, and went further, which is now
Our point of second meeting. Do you find...

70

III,1,1107

Ay, in the catalogue ye go for men;
As hounds and greyhounds, mongrels, spaniels, curs,...

71

III,1,1132

Both of you
Know Banquo was your enemy.

72

III,1,1135

So is he mine; and in such bloody distance,
That every minute of his being thrusts...

73

III,1,1149

Your spirits shine through you. Within this hour at most
I will advise you where to plant yourselves;...

74

III,1,1162

I'll call upon you straight: abide within.
[Exeunt Murderers]...

75

III,2,1184

We have scotch'd the snake, not kill'd it:
She'll close and be herself, whilst our poor malice...

76

III,2,1202

So shall I, love; and so, I pray, be you:
Let your remembrance apply to Banquo;...

77

III,2,1210

O, full of scorpions is my mind, dear wife!
Thou know'st that Banquo, and his Fleance, lives.

78

III,2,1213

There's comfort yet; they are assailable;
Then be thou jocund: ere the bat hath flown...

79

III,2,1220

Be innocent of the knowledge, dearest chuck,
Till thou applaud the deed. Come, seeling night,...

80

III,4,1272

You know your own degrees; sit down: at first
And last the hearty welcome.

81

III,4,1275

Ourself will mingle with society,
And play the humble host....

82

III,4,1282

See, they encounter thee with their hearts' thanks.
Both sides are even: here I'll sit i' the midst:...

83

III,4,1289

'Tis better thee without than he within.
Is he dispatch'd?

84

III,4,1292

Thou art the best o' the cut-throats: yet he's good
That did the like for Fleance: if thou didst it,...

85

III,4,1297

Then comes my fit again: I had else been perfect,
Whole as the marble, founded as the rock,...

86

III,4,1305

Thanks for that:
There the grown serpent lies; the worm that's fled...

87

III,4,1317

Sweet remembrancer!
Now, good digestion wait on appetite,...

88

III,4,1323

Here had we now our country's honour roof'd,
Were the graced person of our Banquo present;...

89

III,4,1330

The table's full.

90

III,4,1332

Where?

91

III,4,1334

Which of you have done this?

92

III,4,1336

Thou canst not say I did it: never shake
Thy gory locks at me.

93

III,4,1345

Ay, and a bold one, that dare look on that
Which might appal the devil.

94

III,4,1356

Prithee, see there! behold! look! lo!
how say you?...

95

III,4,1364

If I stand here, I saw him.

96

III,4,1366

Blood hath been shed ere now, i' the olden time,
Ere human statute purged the gentle weal;...

97

III,4,1377

I do forget.
Do not muse at me, my most worthy friends,...

98

III,4,1388

Avaunt! and quit my sight! let the earth hide thee!
Thy bones are marrowless, thy blood is cold;...

99

III,4,1395

What man dare, I dare:
Approach thou like the rugged Russian bear,...

100

III,4,1409

Can such things be,
And overcome us like a summer's cloud,...

101

III,4,1425

It will have blood; they say, blood will have blood:
Stones have been known to move and trees to speak;...

102

III,4,1431

How say'st thou, that Macduff denies his person
At our great bidding?

103

III,4,1434

I hear it by the way; but I will send:
There's not a one of them but in his house...

104

III,4,1446

Come, we'll to sleep. My strange and self-abuse
Is the initiate fear that wants hard use:...

105

IV,1,1599

How now, you secret, black, and midnight hags!
What is't you do?

106

IV,1,1602

I conjure you, by that which you profess,
Howe'er you come to know it, answer me:...

107

IV,1,1619

Call 'em; let me see 'em.

108

IV,1,1627

Tell me, thou unknown power,—

109

IV,1,1633

Whate'er thou art, for thy good caution, thanks;
Thou hast harp'd my fear aright: but one...

110

IV,1,1640

Had I three ears, I'ld hear thee.

111

IV,1,1645

Then live, Macduff: what need I fear of thee?
But yet I'll make assurance double sure,...

112

IV,1,1662

That will never be
Who can impress the forest, bid the tree...

113

IV,1,1673

I will be satisfied: deny me this,
And an eternal curse fall on you! Let me know....

114

IV,1,1684

Thou art too like the spirit of Banquo: down!
Thy crown does sear mine eye-balls. And thy hair,...

115

IV,1,1708

Where are they? Gone? Let this pernicious hour
Stand aye accursed in the calendar!...

116

IV,1,1713

Saw you the weird sisters?

117

IV,1,1715

Came they not by you?

118

IV,1,1717

Infected be the air whereon they ride;
And damn'd all those that trust them! I did hear...

119

IV,1,1722

Fled to England!

120

IV,1,1724

Time, thou anticipatest my dread exploits:
The flighty purpose never is o'ertook...

121

V,3,2246

Bring me no more reports; let them fly all:
Till Birnam wood remove to Dunsinane,...

122

V,3,2261

Geese, villain!

123

V,3,2263

Go prick thy face, and over-red thy fear,
Thou lily-liver'd boy. What soldiers, patch?...

124

V,3,2268

Take thy face hence.
[Exit Servant]...

125

V,3,2282

What news more?

126

V,3,2284

I'll fight till from my bones my flesh be hack'd.
Give me my armour.

127

V,3,2287

I'll put it on.
Send out more horses; skirr the country round;...

128

V,3,2294

Cure her of that.
Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased,...

129

V,3,2303

Throw physic to the dogs; I'll none of it.
Come, put mine armour on; give me my staff....

130

V,3,2315

Bring it after me.
I will not be afraid of death and bane,...

131

V,5,2353

Hang out our banners on the outward walls;
The cry is still 'They come:' our castle's strength...

132

V,5,2364

I have almost forgot the taste of fears;
The time has been, my senses would have cool'd...

133

V,5,2374

She should have died hereafter;
There would have been a time for such a word....

134

V,5,2391

Well, say, sir.

135

V,5,2395

Liar and slave!

136

V,5,2399

If thou speak'st false,
Upon the next tree shalt thou hang alive,...

137

V,7,2430

They have tied me to a stake; I cannot fly,
But, bear-like, I must fight the course. What's he...

138

V,7,2436

Thou'lt be afraid to hear it.

139

V,7,2439

My name's Macbeth.

140

V,7,2442

No, nor more fearful.

141

V,7,2446

Thou wast born of woman
But swords I smile at, weapons laugh to scorn,...

142

V,8,2473

Why should I play the Roman fool, and die
On mine own sword? whiles I see lives, the gashes...

143

V,8,2478

Of all men else I have avoided thee:
But get thee back; my soul is too much charged...

144

V,8,2485

Thou losest labour:
As easy mayst thou the intrenchant air...

145

V,8,2495

Accursed be that tongue that tells me so,
For it hath cow'd my better part of man!...

146

V,8,2506

I will not yield,
To kiss the ground before young Malcolm's feet,...

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