Speeches (Lines) for Lepidus
in "Antony and Cleopatra"

Total: 30

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,4,434

I must not think there are
Evils enow to darken all his goodness:
His faults in him seem as the spots of heaven,
More fiery by night's blackness; hereditary,
Rather than purchased; what he cannot change,
Than what he chooses.

2

I,4,460

Here's more news.

3

I,4,502

'Tis pity of him.

4

I,4,508

To-morrow, Caesar,
I shall be furnish'd to inform you rightly
Both what by sea and land I can be able
To front this present time.

5

I,4,514

Farewell, my lord: what you shall know meantime
Of stirs abroad, I shall beseech you, sir,
To let me be partaker.

6

II,2,681

Good Enobarbus, 'tis a worthy deed,
And shall become you well, to entreat your captain
To soft and gentle speech.

7

II,2,690

'Tis not a time
For private stomaching.

8

II,2,694

But small to greater matters must give way.

9

II,2,696

Your speech is passion:
But, pray you, stir no embers up. Here comes
The noble Antony.

10

II,2,706

Noble friends,
That which combined us was most great, and let not
A leaner action rend us. What's amiss,
May it be gently heard: when we debate
Our trivial difference loud, we do commit
Murder in healing wounds: then, noble partners,
The rather, for I earnestly beseech,
Touch you the sourest points with sweetest terms,
Nor curstness grow to the matter.

11

II,2,787

Soft, Caesar!

12

II,2,805

'Tis noble spoken.

13

II,2,810

Worthily spoken, Mecaenas.

14

II,2,869

Happily, amen!

15

II,2,875

Time calls upon's:
Of us must Pompey presently be sought,
Or else he seeks out us.

16

II,2,892

Noble Antony,
Not sickness should detain me.
[Flourish. Exeunt OCTAVIUS CAESAR, MARK ANTONY,]
and LEPIDUS]

17

II,4,1033

Trouble yourselves no further: pray you, hasten
Your generals after.

18

II,4,1037

Till I shall see you in your soldier's dress,
Which will become you both, farewell.

19

II,4,1042

Your way is shorter;
My purposes do draw me much about:
You'll win two days upon me.

20

II,4,1046

Farewell.

21

II,6,1245

Be pleased to tell us—
For this is from the present—how you take
The offers we have sent you.

22

II,6,1282

Well met here.

23

II,7,1400

You've strange serpents there.

24

II,7,1402

Your serpent of Egypt is bred now of your mud by the
operation of your sun: so is your crocodile.

25

II,7,1406

I am not so well as I should be, but I'll ne'er out.

26

II,7,1408

Nay, certainly, I have heard the Ptolemies'
pyramises are very goodly things; without
contradiction, I have heard that.

27

II,7,1419

What manner o' thing is your crocodile?

28

II,7,1425

What colour is it of?

29

II,7,1427

'Tis a strange serpent.

30

III,2,1675

Let all the number of the stars give light
To thy fair way!

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