Speeches (Lines) for Leonato
in "Much Ado about Nothing"

Total: 120

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,2

I learn in this letter that Don Peter of Arragon
comes this night to Messina.

2

I,1,6

How many gentlemen have you lost in this action?

3

I,1,8

A victory is twice itself when the achiever brings
home full numbers. I find here that Don Peter hath...

4

I,1,17

He hath an uncle here in Messina will be very much
glad of it.

5

I,1,23

Did he break out into tears?

6

I,1,25

A kind overflow of kindness: there are no faces
truer than those that are so washed. How much...

7

I,1,32

What is he that you ask for, niece?

8

I,1,41

Faith, niece, you tax Signior Benedick too much;
but he'll be meet with you, I doubt it not.

9

I,1,53

You must not, sir, mistake my niece. There is a
kind of merry war betwixt Signior Benedick and her:...

10

I,1,81

You will never run mad, niece.

11

I,1,88

Never came trouble to my house in the likeness of
your grace: for trouble being gone, comfort should...

12

I,1,94

Her mother hath many times told me so.

13

I,1,96

Signior Benedick, no; for then were you a child.

14

I,1,137

If you swear, my lord, you shall not be forsworn.
[To DON JOHN]...

15

I,1,143

Please it your grace lead on?

16

I,2,303

How now, brother! Where is my cousin, your son?
hath he provided this music?

17

I,2,307

Are they good?

18

I,2,317

Hath the fellow any wit that told you this?

19

I,2,320

No, no; we will hold it as a dream till it appear
itself: but I will acquaint my daughter withal,...

20

II,1,399

Was not Count John here at supper?

21

II,1,408

Then half Signior Benedick's tongue in Count John's
mouth, and half Count John's melancholy in Signior...

22

II,1,414

By my troth, niece, thou wilt never get thee a
husband, if thou be so shrewd of thy tongue.

23

II,1,420

So, by being too curst, God will send you no horns.

24

II,1,425

You may light on a husband that hath no beard.

25

II,1,434

Well, then, go you into hell?

26

II,1,449

Well, niece, I hope to see you one day fitted with a husband.

27

II,1,456

Daughter, remember what I told you: if the prince
do solicit you in that kind, you know your answer.

28

II,1,469

Cousin, you apprehend passing shrewdly.

29

II,1,471

The revellers are entering, brother: make good room.
[All put on their masks]...

30

II,1,680

Count, take of me my daughter, and with her my
fortunes: his grace hath made the match, and an...

31

II,1,713

Niece, will you look to those things I told you of?

32

II,1,717

There's little of the melancholy element in her, my
lord: she is never sad but when she sleeps, and...

33

II,1,723

O, by no means: she mocks all her wooers out of suit.

34

II,1,725

O Lord, my lord, if they were but a week married,
they would talk themselves mad.

35

II,1,730

Not till Monday, my dear son, which is hence a just
seven-night; and a time too brief, too, to have all...

36

II,1,742

My lord, I am for you, though it cost me ten
nights' watchings.

37

II,3,914

No, nor I neither; but most wonderful that she
should so dote on Signior Benedick, whom she hath in...

38

II,3,918

By my troth, my lord, I cannot tell what to think
of it but that she loves him with an enraged...

39

II,3,923

O God, counterfeit! There was never counterfeit of
passion came so near the life of passion as she...

40

II,3,928

What effects, my lord? She will sit you, you heard
my daughter tell you how.

41

II,3,934

I would have sworn it had, my lord; especially
against Benedick.

42

II,3,941

No; and swears she never will: that's her torment.

43

II,3,945

This says she now when she is beginning to write to
him; for she'll be up twenty times a night, and...

44

II,3,951

O, when she had writ it and was reading it over, she
found Benedick and Beatrice between the sheet?

45

II,3,954

O, she tore the letter into a thousand halfpence;
railed at herself, that she should be so immodest...

46

II,3,963

She doth indeed; my daughter says so: and the
ecstasy hath so much overborne her that my daughter...

47

II,3,976

O, my lord, wisdom and blood combating in so tender
a body, we have ten proofs to one that blood hath...

48

II,3,984

Were it good, think you?

49

II,3,1002

If he do fear God, a' must necessarily keep peace:
if he break the peace, he ought to enter into a...

50

II,3,1011

Nay, that's impossible: she may wear her heart out first.

51

II,3,1016

My lord, will you walk? dinner is ready.

52

III,2,1214

So say I. methinks you are sadder.

53

III,2,1224

Where is but a humour or a worm.

54

III,2,1243

Indeed, he looks younger than he did, by the loss of a beard.

55

III,5,1581

What would you with me, honest neighbour?

56

III,5,1584

Brief, I pray you; for you see it is a busy time with me.

57

III,5,1587

What is it, my good friends?

58

III,5,1595

Neighbours, you are tedious.

59

III,5,1600

All thy tediousness on me, ah?

60

III,5,1606

I would fain know what you have to say.

61

III,5,1618

Indeed, neighbour, he comes too short of you.

62

III,5,1620

I must leave you.

63

III,5,1624

Take their examination yourself and bring it me: I
am now in great haste, as it may appear unto you.

64

III,5,1627

Drink some wine ere you go: fare you well.

65

III,5,1631

I'll wait upon them: I am ready.

66

IV,1,1644

Come, Friar Francis, be brief; only to the plain
form of marriage, and you shall recount their...

67

IV,1,1649

To be married to her: friar, you come to marry her.

68

IV,1,1658

I dare make his answer, none.

69

IV,1,1666

As freely, son, as God did give her me.

70

IV,1,1683

What do you mean, my lord?

71

IV,1,1686

Dear my lord, if you, in your own proof,
Have vanquish'd the resistance of her youth,...

72

IV,1,1704

Sweet prince, why speak not you?

73

IV,1,1708

Are these things spoken, or do I but dream?

74

IV,1,1715

All this is so: but what of this, my lord?

75

IV,1,1719

I charge thee do so, as thou art my child.

76

IV,1,1753

Hath no man's dagger here a point for me?

77

IV,1,1762

O Fate! take not away thy heavy hand.
Death is the fairest cover for her shame...

78

IV,1,1767

Dost thou look up?

79

IV,1,1769

Wherefore! Why, doth not every earthly thing
Cry shame upon her? Could she here deny...

80

IV,1,1800

Confirm'd, confirm'd! O, that is stronger made
Which was before barr'd up with ribs of iron!...

81

IV,1,1821

Friar, it cannot be.
Thou seest that all the grace that she hath left...

82

IV,1,1841

I know not. If they speak but truth of her,
These hands shall tear her; if they wrong her honour,...

83

IV,1,1861

What shall become of this? what will this do?

84

IV,1,1902

Being that I flow in grief,
The smallest twine may lead me.

85

V,1,2071

I pray thee, cease thy counsel,
Which falls into mine ears as profitless...

86

V,1,2102

I pray thee, peace. I will be flesh and blood;
For there was never yet philosopher...

87

V,1,2109

There thou speak'st reason: nay, I will do so.
My soul doth tell me Hero is belied;...

88

V,1,2117

Hear you. my lords,—

89

V,1,2119

Some haste, my lord! well, fare you well, my lord:
Are you so hasty now? well, all is one.

90

V,1,2125

Marry, thou dost wrong me; thou dissembler, thou:—
Nay, never lay thy hand upon thy sword;...

91

V,1,2131

Tush, tush, man; never fleer and jest at me:
I speak not like a dotard nor a fool,...

92

V,1,2146

Thine, Claudio; thine, I say.

93

V,1,2148

My lord, my lord,
I'll prove it on his body, if he dare,...

94

V,1,2153

Canst thou so daff me? Thou hast kill'd my child:
If thou kill'st me, boy, thou shalt kill a man.

95

V,1,2161

Brother,—

96

V,1,2167

Brother Antony,—

97

V,1,2176

But, brother Antony,—

98

V,1,2183

My lord, my lord,—

99

V,1,2185

No? Come, brother; away! I will be heard.

100

V,1,2331

Which is the villain? let me see his eyes,
That, when I note another man like him,...

101

V,1,2335

Art thou the slave that with thy breath hast kill'd
Mine innocent child?

102

V,1,2338

No, not so, villain; thou beliest thyself:
Here stand a pair of honourable men;...

103

V,1,2353

I cannot bid you bid my daughter live;
That were impossible: but, I pray you both,...

104

V,1,2371

To-morrow then I will expect your coming;
To-night I take my leave. This naughty man...

105

V,1,2389

I thank thee for thy care and honest pains.

106

V,1,2392

There's for thy pains.

107

V,1,2394

Go, I discharge thee of thy prisoner, and I thank thee.

108

V,1,2402

Until to-morrow morning, lords, farewell.

109

V,1,2406

[To the Watch] Bring you these fellows on. We'll
talk with Margaret,...

110

V,4,2546

So are the prince and Claudio, who accused her
Upon the error that you heard debated:...

111

V,4,2554

Well, daughter, and you gentle-women all,
Withdraw into a chamber by yourselves,...

112

V,4,2568

That eye my daughter lent her: 'tis most true.

113

V,4,2570

The sight whereof I think you had from me,
From Claudio and the prince: but what's your will?

114

V,4,2577

My heart is with your liking.

115

V,4,2582

Good morrow, prince; good morrow, Claudio:
We here attend you. Are you yet determined...

116

V,4,2586

Call her forth, brother; here's the friar ready.

117

V,4,2605

No, that you shall not, till you take her hand
Before this friar and swear to marry her.

118

V,4,2617

She died, my lord, but whiles her slander lived.

119

V,4,2637

Come, cousin, I am sure you love the gentleman.

120

V,4,2674

We'll have dancing afterward.

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