Speeches (Lines) for Lear
in "King Lear"

Total: 188

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,33

Attend the lords of France and Burgundy, Gloucester.

2

I,1,36

Meantime we shall express our darker purpose.
Give me the map there. Know we have divided...

3

I,1,63

Of all these bounds, even from this line to this,
With shadowy forests and with champains rich'd,...

4

I,1,81

To thee and thine hereditary ever
Remain this ample third of our fair kingdom,...

5

I,1,90

Nothing?

6

I,1,92

Nothing can come of nothing. Speak again.

7

I,1,96

How, how, Cordelia? Mend your speech a little,
Lest it may mar your fortunes.

8

I,1,108

But goes thy heart with this?

9

I,1,110

So young, and so untender?

10

I,1,112

Let it be so! thy truth then be thy dower!
For, by the sacred radiance of the sun,...

11

I,1,126

Peace, Kent!
Come not between the dragon and his wrath....

12

I,1,149

The bow is bent and drawn; make from the shaft.

13

I,1,161

Kent, on thy life, no more!

14

I,1,165

Out of my sight!

15

I,1,168

Now by Apollo-

16

I,1,171

O vassal! miscreant! [Lays his hand on his sword.]

17

I,1,178

Hear me, recreant!
On thine allegiance, hear me!...

18

I,1,203

My Lord of Burgundy,
We first address toward you, who with this king...

19

I,1,211

Right noble Burgundy,
When she was dear to us, we did hold her so;...

20

I,1,219

Will you, with those infirmities she owes,
Unfriended, new adopted to our hate,...

21

I,1,225

Then leave her, sir; for, by the pow'r that made me,
I tell you all her wealth. [To France] For you, great King,...

22

I,1,254

Better thou
Hadst not been born than not t' have pleas'd me better.

23

I,1,267

Nothing! I have sworn; I am firm.

24

I,1,285

Thou hast her, France; let her be thine; for we
Have no such daughter, nor shall ever see...

25

I,4,543

Let me not stay a jot for dinner; go get it ready. [Exit
an Attendant.]
How now? What art thou?

26

I,4,546

What dost thou profess? What wouldst thou with us?

27

I,4,551

What art thou?

28

I,4,553

If thou be'st as poor for a subject as he's for a king, thou
art poor enough. What wouldst thou?

29

I,4,556

Who wouldst thou serve?

30

I,4,558

Dost thou know me, fellow?

31

I,4,561

What's that?

32

I,4,563

What services canst thou do?

33

I,4,568

How old art thou?

34

I,4,571

Follow me; thou shalt serve me. If I like thee no worse after
dinner, I will not part from thee yet. Dinner, ho, dinner!...

35

I,4,578

What says the fellow there? Call the clotpoll back.
[Exit a Knight.] Where's my fool, ho? I think the world's...

36

I,4,584

Why came not the slave back to me when I call'd him?

37

I,4,586

He would not?

38

I,4,592

Ha! say'st thou so?

39

I,4,595

Thou but rememb'rest me of mine own conception. I have
perceived a most faint neglect of late, which I have rather...

40

I,4,602

No more of that; I have noted it well. Go you and tell my
daughter I would speak with her. [Exit Knight.] Go you, call...

41

I,4,609

'My lady's father'? My lord's knave! You whoreson dog! you
slave! you cur!

42

I,4,612

Do you bandy looks with me, you rascal?

43

I,4,617

I thank thee, fellow. Thou serv'st me, and I'll love thee.

44

I,4,622

Now, my friendly knave, I thank thee. There's earnest of thy
service. [Gives money.]

45

I,4,627

How now, my pretty knave? How dost thou?

46

I,4,636

Why, my boy?

47

I,4,639

Take heed, sirrah- the whip.

48

I,4,642

A pestilent gall to me!

49

I,4,644

Do.

50

I,4,659

Why, no, boy. Nothing can be made out of nothing.

51

I,4,662

A bitter fool!

52

I,4,665

No, lad; teach me.

53

I,4,674

Dost thou call me fool, boy?

54

I,4,683

What two crowns shall they be?

55

I,4,694

When were you wont to be so full of songs, sirrah?

56

I,4,704

An you lie, sirrah, we'll have you whipp'd.

57

I,4,712

How now, daughter? What makes that frontlet on? Methinks you
are too much o' late i' th' frown.

58

I,4,740

Are you our daughter?

59

I,4,748

Doth any here know me? This is not Lear.
Doth Lear walk thus? speak thus? Where are his eyes?...

60

I,4,754

I would learn that; for, by the marks of sovereignty,
Knowledge, and reason, I should be false persuaded...

61

I,4,758

Your name, fair gentlewoman?

62

I,4,775

Darkness and devils!
Saddle my horses! Call my train together!...

63

I,4,782

Woe that too late repents!- O, sir, are you come?
Is it your will? Speak, sir!- Prepare my horses....

64

I,4,788

[to Goneril] Detested kite, thou liest!
My train are men of choice and rarest parts,...

65

I,4,801

It may be so, my lord.
Hear, Nature, hear! dear goddess, hear!...

66

I,4,822

What, fifty of my followers at a clap?
Within a fortnight?

67

I,4,825

I'll tell thee. [To Goneril] Life and death! I am asham'd
That thou hast power to shake my manhood thus;...

68

I,5,881

Go you before to Gloucester with these letters. Acquaint my
daughter no further with anything you know than comes from her...

69

I,5,888

Ay, boy.

70

I,5,890

Ha, ha, ha!

71

I,5,894

What canst tell, boy?

72

I,5,897

No.

73

I,5,900

I did her wrong.

74

I,5,902

No.

75

I,5,904

Why?

76

I,5,907

I will forget my nature. So kind a father!- Be my horses
ready?

77

I,5,911

Because they are not eight?

78

I,5,913

To tak't again perforce! Monster ingratitude!

79

I,5,916

How's that?

80

I,5,918

O, let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven!
Keep me in temper; I would not be mad! [Enter a Gentleman.]...

81

I,5,922

Come, boy.

82

II,4,1274

'Tis strange that they should so depart from home,
And not send back my messenger.

83

II,4,1280

Ha!
Mak'st thou this shame thy pastime?

84

II,4,1287

What's he that hath so much thy place mistook
To set thee here?

85

II,4,1291

No.

86

II,4,1293

No, I say.

87

II,4,1295

No, no, they would not!

88

II,4,1297

By Jupiter, I swear no!

89

II,4,1299

They durst not do't;
They would not, could not do't. 'Tis worse than murther...

90

II,4,1333

O, how this mother swells up toward my heart!
Hysterica passio! Down, thou climbing sorrow!...

91

II,4,1337

Follow me not;
Stay here. Exit.

92

II,4,1364

Deny to speak with me? They are sick? they are weary?
They have travell'd all the night? Mere fetches-...

93

II,4,1372

Vengeance! plague! death! confusion!
Fiery? What quality? Why, Gloucester, Gloucester,...

94

II,4,1376

Inform'd them? Dost thou understand me, man?

95

II,4,1378

The King would speak with Cornwall; the dear father
Would with his daughter speak, commands her service....

96

II,4,1398

O me, my heart, my rising heart! But down!

97

II,4,1404

Good morrow to you both.

98

II,4,1408

Regan, I think you are; I know what reason
I have to think so. If thou shouldst not be glad,...

99

II,4,1421

Say, how is that?

100

II,4,1427

My curses on her!

101

II,4,1435

Ask her forgiveness?
Do you but mark how this becomes the house:...

102

II,4,1442

[rises] Never, Regan!
She hath abated me of half my train;...

103

II,4,1450

You nimble lightnings, dart your blinding flames
Into her scornful eyes! Infect her beauty,...

104

II,4,1456

No, Regan, thou shalt never have my curse.
Thy tender-hefted nature shall not give...

105

II,4,1470

Who put my man i' th' stocks?

106

II,4,1476

This is a slave, whose easy-borrowed pride
Dwells in the fickle grace of her he follows....

107

II,4,1481

Who stock'd my servant? Regan, I have good hope
Thou didst not know on't.- Who comes here? O heavens!...

108

II,4,1491

O sides, you are too tough!
Will you yet hold? How came my man i' th' stocks?

109

II,4,1495

You? Did you?

110

II,4,1502

Return to her, and fifty men dismiss'd?
No, rather I abjure all roofs, and choose...

111

II,4,1514

I prithee, daughter, do not make me mad.
I will not trouble thee, my child; farewell....

112

II,4,1534

Is this well spoken?

113

II,4,1548

I gave you all-

114

II,4,1550

Made you my guardians, my depositaries;
But kept a reservation to be followed...

115

II,4,1555

Those wicked creatures yet do look well-favour'd
When others are more wicked; not being the worst...

116

II,4,1565

O, reason not the need! Our basest beggars
Are in the poorest thing superfluous....

117

III,2,1678

Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow!
You cataracts and hurricanoes, spout...

118

III,2,1690

Rumble thy bellyful! Spit, fire! spout, rain!
Nor rain, wind, thunder, fire are my daughters....

119

III,2,1713

No, I will be the pattern of all patience;
I will say nothing.

120

III,2,1726

Let the great gods,
That keep this dreadful pudder o'er our heads,...

121

III,2,1746

My wits begin to turn.
Come on, my boy. How dost, my boy? Art cold?...

122

III,2,1758

True, my good boy. Come, bring us to this hovel.

123

III,4,1804

Let me alone.

124

III,4,1806

Wilt break my heart?

125

III,4,1808

Thou think'st 'tis much that this contentious storm
Invades us to the skin. So 'tis to thee;...

126

III,4,1826

Prithee go in thyself; seek thine own ease.
This tempest will not give me leave to ponder...

127

III,4,1850

Hast thou given all to thy two daughters, and art thou come
to this?

128

III,4,1863

What, have his daughters brought him to this pass?
Couldst thou save nothing? Didst thou give 'em all?

129

III,4,1866

Now all the plagues that in the pendulous air
Hang fated o'er men's faults light on thy daughters!

130

III,4,1869

Death, traitor! nothing could have subdu'd nature
To such a lowness but his unkind daughters....

131

III,4,1880

What hast thou been?

132

III,4,1896

Why, thou wert better in thy grave than to answer with thy
uncover'd body this extremity of the skies. Is man no more than...

133

III,4,1920

What's he?

134

III,4,1946

First let me talk with this philosopher.
What is the cause of thunder?

135

III,4,1949

I'll talk a word with this same learned Theban.
What is your study?

136

III,4,1952

Let me ask you one word in private.

137

III,4,1965

O, cry you mercy, sir.
Noble philosopher, your company.

138

III,4,1969

Come, let's in all.

139

III,4,1971

With him!
I will keep still with my philosopher.

140

III,4,1976

Come, good Athenian.

141

III,6,2017

A king, a king!

142

III,6,2020

To have a thousand with red burning spits
Come hizzing in upon 'em-

143

III,6,2025

It shall be done; I will arraign them straight.
[To Edgar] Come, sit thou here, most learned justicer....

144

III,6,2039

I'll see their trial first. Bring in their evidence.
[To Edgar] Thou, robed man of justice, take thy place....

145

III,6,2050

Arraign her first. 'Tis Goneril. I here take my oath before
this honourable assembly, she kicked the poor King her father.

146

III,6,2053

She cannot deny it.

147

III,6,2055

And here's another, whose warp'd looks proclaim
What store her heart is made on. Stop her there!...

148

III,6,2064

The little dogs and all,
Tray, Blanch, and Sweetheart, see, they bark at me.

149

III,6,2077

Then let them anatomize Regan. See what breeds about her
heart. Is there any cause in nature that makes these hard...

150

III,6,2083

Make no noise, make no noise; draw the curtains.
So, so, so. We'll go to supper i' th' morning. So, so, so.

151

IV,6,2694

No, they cannot touch me for coming;
I am the King himself.

152

IV,6,2697

Nature 's above art in that respect. There's your press
money. That fellow handles his bow like a crow-keeper. Draw me...

153

IV,6,2704

Pass.

154

IV,6,2706

Ha! Goneril with a white beard? They flatter'd me like a dog,
and told me I had white hairs in my beard ere the black ones...

155

IV,6,2716

Ay, every inch a king!
When I do stare, see how the subject quakes....

156

IV,6,2742

Let me wipe it first; it smells of mortality.

157

IV,6,2745

I remember thine eyes well enough. Dost thou squiny at me?
No, do thy worst, blind Cupid! I'll not love. Read thou this...

158

IV,6,2751

Read.

159

IV,6,2753

O, ho, are you there with me? No eyes in your head, nor no
money in your purse? Your eyes are in a heavy case, your purse...

160

IV,6,2757

What, art mad? A man may see how the world goes with no eyes.
Look with thine ears. See how yond justice rails upon yond...

161

IV,6,2763

And the creature run from the cur? There thou mightst behold
the great image of authority: a dog's obeyed in office....

162

IV,6,2781

If thou wilt weep my fortunes, take my eyes.
I know thee well enough; thy name is Gloucester....

163

IV,6,2787

When we are born, we cry that we are come
To this great stage of fools. This' a good block....

164

IV,6,2796

No rescue? What, a prisoner? I am even
The natural fool of fortune. Use me well;...

165

IV,6,2801

No seconds? All myself?
Why, this would make a man a man of salt,...

166

IV,6,2806

I will die bravely, like a smug bridegroom. What!
I will be jovial. Come, come, I am a king;...

167

IV,6,2810

Then there's life in't. Nay, an you get it, you shall get it
by running. Sa, sa, sa, sa!

168

IV,7,2961

You do me wrong to take me out o' th' grave.
Thou art a soul in bliss; but I am bound...

169

IV,7,2966

You are a spirit, I know. When did you die?

170

IV,7,2969

Where have I been? Where am I? Fair daylight,
I am mightily abus'd. I should e'en die with pity,...

171

IV,7,2978

Pray, do not mock me.
I am a very foolish fond old man,...

172

IV,7,2991

Be your tears wet? Yes, faith. I pray weep not.
If you have poison for me, I will drink it....

173

IV,7,2997

Am I in France?

174

IV,7,2999

Do not abuse me.

175

IV,7,3006

You must bear with me.
Pray you now, forget and forgive. I am old and foolish.

176

V,3,3131

No, no, no, no! Come, let's away to prison.
We two alone will sing like birds i' th' cage....

177

V,3,3144

Upon such sacrifices, my Cordelia,
The gods themselves throw incense. Have I caught thee?...

178

V,3,3434

Howl, howl, howl, howl! O, you are men of stone.
Had I your tongues and eyes, I'ld use them so...

179

V,3,3444

This feather stirs; she lives! If it be so,
It is a chance which does redeem all sorrows...

180

V,3,3448

Prithee away!

181

V,3,3450

A plague upon you, murderers, traitors all!
I might have sav'd her; now she's gone for ever!...

182

V,3,3457

Did I not, fellow?
I have seen the day, with my good biting falchion...

183

V,3,3464

This' a dull sight. Are you not Kent?

184

V,3,3467

He's a good fellow, I can tell you that.
He'll strike, and quickly too. He's dead and rotten.

185

V,3,3470

I'll see that straight.

186

V,3,3473

You're welcome hither.

187

V,3,3477

Ay, so I think.

188

V,3,3494

And my poor fool is hang'd! No, no, no life!
Why should a dog, a horse, a rat, have life,...

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