Speeches (Lines) for Lady Macbeth
in "Macbeth"

Total: 59

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,5,345

'They met me in the day of success: and I have
learned by the perfectest report, they have more in...

2

I,5,378

Thou'rt mad to say it:
Is not thy master with him? who, were't so,...

3

I,5,385

Give him tending;
He brings great news....

4

I,5,413

And when goes hence?

5

I,5,415

O, never
Shall sun that morrow see!...

6

I,5,427

Only look up clear;
To alter favour ever is to fear:...

7

I,6,450

All our service
In every point twice done and then done double...

8

I,6,463

Your servants ever
Have theirs, themselves and what is theirs, in compt,...

9

I,7,504

He has almost supp'd: why have you left the chamber?

10

I,7,506

Know you not he has?

11

I,7,512

Was the hope drunk
Wherein you dress'd yourself? hath it slept since?...

12

I,7,526

What beast was't, then,
That made you break this enterprise to me?...

13

I,7,540

We fail!
But screw your courage to the sticking-place,...

14

I,7,560

Who dares receive it other,
As we shall make our griefs and clamour roar...

15

II,2,647

That which hath made them drunk hath made me bold;
What hath quench'd them hath given me fire....

16

II,2,658

Alack, I am afraid they have awaked,
And 'tis not done. The attempt and not the deed...

17

II,2,666

I heard the owl scream and the crickets cry.
Did not you speak?

18

II,2,669

Now.

19

II,2,671

Ay.

20

II,2,674

Donalbain.

21

II,2,677

A foolish thought, to say a sorry sight.

22

II,2,683

There are two lodged together.

23

II,2,688

Consider it not so deeply.

24

II,2,692

These deeds must not be thought
After these ways; so, it will make us mad.

25

II,2,700

What do you mean?

26

II,2,704

Who was it that thus cried? Why, worthy thane,
You do unbend your noble strength, to think...

27

II,2,714

Infirm of purpose!
Give me the daggers: the sleeping and the dead...

28

II,2,729

My hands are of your colour; but I shame
To wear a heart so white....

29

II,3,858

What's the business,
That such a hideous trumpet calls to parley...

30

II,3,868

Woe, alas!
What, in our house?

31

II,3,907

Help me hence, ho!

32

III,1,1015

If he had been forgotten,
It had been as a gap in our great feast,...

33

III,2,1168

Is Banquo gone from court?

34

III,2,1170

Say to the king, I would attend his leisure
For a few words.

35

III,2,1174

Nought's had, all's spent,
Where our desire is got without content:...

36

III,2,1199

Come on;
Gentle my lord, sleek o'er your rugged looks;...

37

III,2,1209

You must leave this.

38

III,2,1212

But in them nature's copy's not eterne.

39

III,2,1219

What's to be done?

40

III,4,1279

Pronounce it for me, sir, to all our friends;
For my heart speaks they are welcome.

41

III,4,1311

My royal lord,
You do not give the cheer: the feast is sold...

42

III,4,1339

Sit, worthy friends: my lord is often thus,
And hath been from his youth: pray you, keep seat;...

43

III,4,1347

O proper stuff!
This is the very painting of your fear:...

44

III,4,1363

What, quite unmann'd in folly?

45

III,4,1365

Fie, for shame!

46

III,4,1375

My worthy lord,
Your noble friends do lack you.

47

III,4,1392

Think of this, good peers,
But as a thing of custom: 'tis no other;...

48

III,4,1407

You have displaced the mirth, broke the good meeting,
With most admired disorder.

49

III,4,1417

I pray you, speak not; he grows worse and worse;
Question enrages him. At once, good night:...

50

III,4,1423

A kind good night to all!

51

III,4,1430

Almost at odds with morning, which is which.

52

III,4,1433

Did you send to him, sir?

53

III,4,1445

You lack the season of all natures, sleep.

54

V,1,2156

Yet here's a spot.

55

V,1,2159

Out, damned spot! out, I say!—One: two: why,
then, 'tis time to do't.—Hell is murky!—Fie, my...

56

V,1,2166

The thane of Fife had a wife: where is she now?—
What, will these hands ne'er be clean?—No more o'...

57

V,1,2173

Here's the smell of the blood still: all the
perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little...

58

V,1,2184

Wash your hands, put on your nightgown; look not so
pale.—I tell you yet again, Banquo's buried; he...

59

V,1,2188

To bed, to bed! there's knocking at the gate:
come, come, come, come, give me your hand. What's...

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