Speeches (Lines) for King John
in "King John"

Total: 95

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,3

Now, say, Chatillon, what would France with us?

2

I,1,8

Silence, good mother; hear the embassy.

3

I,1,18

What follows if we disallow of this?

4

I,1,21

Here have we war for war and blood for blood,
Controlment for controlment: so answer France.

5

I,1,25

Bear mine to him, and so depart in peace:
Be thou as lightning in the eyes of France;...

6

I,1,42

Our strong possession and our right for us.

7

I,1,51

Let them approach.
Our abbeys and our priories shall pay...

8

I,1,61

What art thou?

9

I,1,63

Is that the elder, and art thou the heir?
You came not of one mother then, it seems.

10

I,1,77

A good blunt fellow. Why, being younger born,
Doth he lay claim to thine inheritance?

11

I,1,90

Why, what a madcap hath heaven lent us here!

12

I,1,95

Mine eye hath well examined his parts
And finds them perfect Richard. Sirrah, speak,...

13

I,1,122

Sirrah, your brother is legitimate;
Your father's wife did after wedlock bear him,...

14

I,1,163

What is thy name?

15

I,1,166

From henceforth bear his name whose form thou bear'st:
Kneel thou down Philip, but rise more great,...

16

I,1,182

Go, Faulconbridge: now hast thou thy desire;
A landless knight makes thee a landed squire....

17

II,1,378

Peace be to France, if France in peace permit
Our just and lineal entrance to our own;...

18

II,1,404

From whom hast thou this great commission, France,
To draw my answer from thy articles?

19

II,1,412

Alack, thou dost usurp authority.

20

II,1,451

My life as soon: I do defy thee, France.
Arthur of Bretagne, yield thee to my hand;...

21

II,1,481

Bedlam, have done.

22

II,1,503

England, for itself.
You men of Angiers, and my loving subjects—

23

II,1,507

For our advantage; therefore hear us first.
These flags of France, that are advanced here...

24

II,1,570

Acknowledge then the king, and let me in.

25

II,1,574

Doth not the crown of England prove the king?
And if not that, I bring you witnesses,...

26

II,1,578

To verify our title with their lives.

27

II,1,584

Then God forgive the sin of all those souls
That to their everlasting residence,...

28

II,1,599

Up higher to the plain; where we'll set forth
In best appointment all our regiments.

29

II,1,644

France, hast thou yet more blood to cast away?
Say, shall the current of our right run on?...

30

II,1,671

Whose party do the townsmen yet admit?

31

II,1,675

In us, that are our own great deputy
And bear possession of our person here,...

32

II,1,707

Now, by the sky that hangs above our heads,
I like it well. France, shall we knit our powers...

33

II,1,719

We from the west will send destruction
Into this city's bosom.

34

II,1,733

Speak on with favour; we are bent to hear.

35

II,1,796

If that the Dauphin there, thy princely son,
Can in this book of beauty read 'I love,'...

36

II,1,834

What say these young ones? What say you my niece?

37

II,1,837

Speak then, prince Dauphin; can you love this lady?

38

II,1,840

Then do I give Volquessen, Touraine, Maine,
Poictiers and Anjou, these five provinces,...

39

II,1,864

We will heal up all;
For we'll create young Arthur Duke of Bretagne...

40

III,1,1055

We like not this; thou dost forget thyself.

41

III,1,1069

What earthy name to interrogatories
Can task the free breath of a sacred king?...

42

III,1,1084

Though you and all the kings of Christendom
Are led so grossly by this meddling priest,...

43

III,1,1125

Philip, what say'st thou to the cardinal?

44

III,1,1142

The king is moved, and answers not to this.

45

III,1,1251

France, thou shalt rue this hour within this hour.

46

III,1,1267

Cousin, go draw our puissance together.
[Exit BASTARD]...

47

III,1,1276

No more than he that threats. To arms let's hie!

48

III,2,1285

Hubert, keep this boy. Philip, make up:
My mother is assailed in our tent,...

49

III,3,1296

[To QUEEN ELINOR] So shall it be; your grace shall
stay behind...

50

III,3,1304

[To the BASTARD] Cousin, away for England!
haste before:...

51

III,3,1317

Coz, farewell.

52

III,3,1320

Come hither, Hubert. O my gentle Hubert,
We owe thee much! within this wall of flesh...

53

III,3,1331

Good friend, thou hast no cause to say so yet,
But thou shalt have; and creep time ne'er so slow,...

54

III,3,1359

Do not I know thou wouldst?
Good Hubert, Hubert, Hubert, throw thine eye...

55

III,3,1368

Death.

56

III,3,1370

A grave.

57

III,3,1372

Enough.
I could be merry now. Hubert, I love thee;...

58

III,3,1378

For England, cousin, go:
Hubert shall be your man, attend on you...

59

IV,2,1728

Here once again we sit, once again crown'd,
And looked upon, I hope, with cheerful eyes.

60

IV,2,1767

Some reasons of this double coronation
I have possess'd you with and think them strong;...

61

IV,2,1795

Let it be so: I do commit his youth
To your direction. Hubert, what news with you?

62

IV,2,1811

We cannot hold mortality's strong hand:
Good lords, although my will to give is living,...

63

IV,2,1819

Why do you bend such solemn brows on me?
Think you I bear the shears of destiny?...

64

IV,2,1833

They burn in indignation. I repent:
There is no sure foundation set on blood,...

65

IV,2,1847

O, where hath our intelligence been drunk?
Where hath it slept? Where is my mother's care,...

66

IV,2,1857

Withhold thy speed, dreadful occasion!
O, make a league with me, till I have pleased...

67

IV,2,1864

Thou hast made me giddy
With these ill tidings....

68

IV,2,1872

Bear with me cousin, for I was amazed
Under the tide: but now I breathe again...

69

IV,2,1888

Thou idle dreamer, wherefore didst thou so?

70

IV,2,1890

Hubert, away with him; imprison him;
And on that day at noon whereon he says...

71

IV,2,1904

Gentle kinsman, go,
And thrust thyself into their companies:...

72

IV,2,1909

Nay, but make haste; the better foot before.
O, let me have no subject enemies,...

73

IV,2,1917

Spoke like a sprightful noble gentleman.
Go after him; for he perhaps shall need...

74

IV,2,1923

My mother dead!

75

IV,2,1928

Five moons!

76

IV,2,1947

Why seek'st thou to possess me with these fears?
Why urgest thou so oft young Arthur's death?...

77

IV,2,1952

It is the curse of kings to be attended
By slaves that take their humours for a warrant...

78

IV,2,1960

O, when the last account 'twixt heaven and earth
Is to be made, then shall this hand and seal...

79

IV,2,1975

Hadst thou but shook thy head or made a pause
When I spake darkly what I purposed,...

80

IV,2,2004

Doth Arthur live? O, haste thee to the peers,
Throw this report on their incensed rage,...

81

V,1,2192

Thus have I yielded up into your hand
The circle of my glory.

82

V,1,2198

Now keep your holy word: go meet the French,
And from his holiness use all your power...

83

V,1,2219

Is this Ascension-day? Did not the prophet
Say that before Ascension-day at noon...

84

V,1,2232

Would not my lords return to me again,
After they heard young Arthur was alive?

85

V,1,2237

That villain Hubert told me he did live.

86

V,1,2257

The legate of the pope hath been with me,
And I have made a happy peace with him;...

87

V,1,2273

Have thou the ordering of this present time.

88

V,3,2467

How goes the day with us? O, tell me, Hubert.

89

V,3,2469

This fever, that hath troubled me so long,
Lies heavy on me; O, my heart is sick!

90

V,3,2475

Tell him, toward Swinstead, to the abbey there.

91

V,3,2481

Ay me! this tyrant fever burns me up,
And will not let me welcome this good news....

92

V,7,2660

Ay, marry, now my soul hath elbow-room;
It would not out at windows nor at doors....

93

V,7,2668

Poison'd,—ill fare—dead, forsook, cast off:
And none of you will bid the winter come...

94

V,7,2679

The salt in them is hot.
Within me is a hell; and there the poison...

95

V,7,2686

O cousin, thou art come to set mine eye:
The tackle of my heart is crack'd and burn'd,...

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