Speeches (Lines) for Katherina
in "Taming of the Shrew"

Total: 82

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,353

[To BAPTISTA] I pray you, sir, is it your will
To make a stale of me amongst these mates?

2

I,1,357

I' faith, sir, you shall never need to fear;
Iwis it is not halfway to her heart;
But if it were, doubt not her care should be
To comb your noddle with a three-legg'd stool,
And paint your face, and use you like a fool.

3

I,1,374

A pretty peat! it is best
Put finger in the eye, an she knew why.

4

I,1,399

Why, and I trust I may go too, may I not?
What! shall I be appointed hours, as though, belike,
I knew not what to take and what to leave? Ha! Exit

5

II,1,844

Of all thy suitors here I charge thee tell
Whom thou lov'st best. See thou dissemble not.

6

II,1,849

Minion, thou liest. Is't not Hortensio?

7

II,1,852

O then, belike, you fancy riches more:
You will have Gremio to keep you fair.

8

II,1,858

[Strikes her] If that be jest, then an the rest was so.

9

II,1,867

Her silence flouts me, and I'll be reveng'd.

10

II,1,871

What, will you not suffer me? Nay, now I see
She is your treasure, she must have a husband;
I must dance bare-foot on her wedding-day,
And for your love to her lead apes in hell.
Talk not to me; I will go sit and weep,
Till I can find occasion of revenge. Exit KATHERINA

11

II,1,1029

Well have you heard, but something hard of hearing:
They call me Katherine that do talk of me.

12

II,1,1041

Mov'd! in good time! Let him that mov'd you hither
Remove you hence. I knew you at the first
You were a moveable.

13

II,1,1045

A join'd-stool.

14

II,1,1047

Asses are made to bear, and so are you.

15

II,1,1049

No such jade as you, if me you mean.

16

II,1,1052

Too light for such a swain as you to catch;
And yet as heavy as my weight should be.

17

II,1,1055

Well ta'en, and like a buzzard.

18

II,1,1057

Ay, for a turtle, as he takes a buzzard.

19

II,1,1059

If I be waspish, best beware my sting.

20

II,1,1061

Ay, if the fool could find it where it lies.

21

II,1,1064

In his tongue.

22

II,1,1066

Yours, if you talk of tales; and so farewell.

23

II,1,1069

That I'll try. [She strikes him]

24

II,1,1071

So may you lose your arms.
If you strike me, you are no gentleman;
And if no gentleman, why then no arms.

25

II,1,1075

What is your crest- a coxcomb?

26

II,1,1077

No cock of mine: you crow too like a craven.

27

II,1,1079

It is my fashion, when I see a crab.

28

II,1,1081

There is, there is.

29

II,1,1083

Had I a glass I would.

30

II,1,1085

Well aim'd of such a young one.

31

II,1,1087

Yet you are wither'd.

32

II,1,1089

I care not.

33

II,1,1091

I chafe you, if I tarry; let me go.

34

II,1,1107

Go, fool, and whom thou keep'st command.

35

II,1,1112

Where did you study all this goodly speech?

36

II,1,1114

A witty mother! witless else her son.

37

II,1,1116

Yes, keep you warm.

38

II,1,1136

Call you me daughter? Now I promise you
You have show'd a tender fatherly regard
To wish me wed to one half lunatic,
A mad-cap ruffian and a swearing Jack,
That thinks with oaths to face the matter out.

39

II,1,1150

I'll see thee hang'd on Sunday first.

40

III,2,1371

No shame but mine; I must, forsooth, be forc'd
To give my hand, oppos'd against my heart,
Unto a mad-brain rudesby, full of spleen,
Who woo'd in haste and means to wed at leisure.
I told you, I, he was a frantic fool,
Hiding his bitter jests in blunt behaviour;
And, to be noted for a merry man,
He'll woo a thousand, 'point the day of marriage,
Make friends invited, and proclaim the banns;
Yet never means to wed where he hath woo'd.
Now must the world point at poor Katherine,
And say 'Lo, there is mad Petruchio's wife,
If it would please him come and marry her!'

41

III,2,1389

Would Katherine had never seen him though!

42

III,2,1565

Let me entreat you.

43

III,2,1567

Are you content to stay?

44

III,2,1570

Now, if you love me, stay.

45

III,2,1573

Nay, then,
Do what thou canst, I will not go to-day;
No, nor to-morrow, not till I please myself.
The door is open, sir; there lies your way;
You may be jogging whiles your boots are green;
For me, I'll not be gone till I please myself.
'Tis like you'll prove a jolly surly groom
That take it on you at the first so roundly.

46

III,2,1582

I will be angry; what hast thou to do?
Father, be quiet; he shall stay my leisure.

47

III,2,1585

Gentlemen, forward to the bridal dinner.
I see a woman may be made a fool
If she had not a spirit to resist.

48

IV,1,1760

Patience, I pray you; 'twas a fault unwilling.

49

IV,1,1777

I pray you, husband, be not so disquiet;
The meat was well, if you were so contented.

50

IV,3,1958

The more my wrong, the more his spite appears.
What, did he marry me to famish me?
Beggars that come unto my father's door
Upon entreaty have a present alms;
If not, elsewhere they meet with charity;
But I, who never knew how to entreat,
Nor never needed that I should entreat,
Am starv'd for meat, giddy for lack of sleep;
With oaths kept waking, and with brawling fed;
And that which spites me more than all these wants-
He does it under name of perfect love;
As who should say, if I should sleep or eat,
'Twere deadly sickness or else present death.
I prithee go and get me some repast;
I care not what, so it be wholesome food.

51

IV,3,1974

'Tis passing good; I prithee let me have it.

52

IV,3,1977

I like it well; good Grumio, fetch it me.

53

IV,3,1980

A dish that I do love to feed upon.

54

IV,3,1982

Why then the beef, and let the mustard rest.

55

IV,3,1985

Then both, or one, or anything thou wilt.

56

IV,3,1987

Go, get thee gone, thou false deluding slave,
[Beats him]
That feed'st me with the very name of meat.
Sorrow on thee and all the pack of you
That triumph thus upon my misery!
Go, get thee gone, I say.

57

IV,3,1996

Faith, as cold as can be.

58

IV,3,2004

I pray you, let it stand.

59

IV,3,2007

I thank you, sir.

60

IV,3,2032

I'll have no bigger; this doth fit the time,
And gentlewomen wear such caps as these.

61

IV,3,2037

Why, sir, I trust I may have leave to speak;
And speak I will. I am no child, no babe.
Your betters have endur'd me say my mind,
And if you cannot, best you stop your ears.
My tongue will tell the anger of my heart,
Or else my heart, concealing it, will break;
And rather than it shall, I will be free
Even to the uttermost, as I please, in words.

62

IV,3,2048

Love me or love me not, I like the cap;
And it I will have, or I will have none. Exit HABERDASHER

63

IV,3,2065

I never saw a better fashion'd gown,
More quaint, more pleasing, nor more commendable;
Belike you mean to make a puppet of me.

64

IV,3,2148

I dare assure you, sir, 'tis almost two,
And 'twill be supper-time ere you come there.

65

IV,5,2269

The moon? The sun! It is not moonlight now.

66

IV,5,2271

I know it is the sun that shines so bright.

67

IV,5,2278

Forward, I pray, since we have come so far,
And be it moon, or sun, or what you please;
And if you please to call it a rush-candle,
Henceforth I vow it shall be so for me.

68

IV,5,2283

I know it is the moon.

69

IV,5,2285

Then, God be bless'd, it is the blessed sun;
But sun it is not, when you say it is not;
And the moon changes even as your mind.
What you will have it nam'd, even that it is,
And so it shall be so for Katherine.

70

IV,5,2304

Young budding virgin, fair and fresh and sweet,
Whither away, or where is thy abode?
Happy the parents of so fair a child;
Happier the man whom favourable stars
Allots thee for his lovely bed-fellow.

71

IV,5,2312

Pardon, old father, my mistaking eyes,
That have been so bedazzled with the sun
That everything I look on seemeth green;
Now I perceive thou art a reverend father.
Pardon, I pray thee, for my mad mistaking.

72

V,1,2479

Husband, let's follow to see the end of this ado.

73

V,1,2481

What, in the midst of the street?

74

V,1,2483

No, sir; God forbid; but asham'd to kiss.

75

V,1,2485

Nay, I will give thee a kiss; now pray thee, love, stay.

76

V,2,2510

Mistress, how mean you that?

77

V,2,2515

'He that is giddy thinks the world turns round.'
I pray you tell me what you meant by that.

78

V,2,2520

A very mean meaning.

79

V,2,2522

And I am mean, indeed, respecting you.

80

V,2,2605

What is your sir, that you send for me?

81

V,2,2607

They sit conferring by the parlour fire.

82

V,2,2644

Fie, fie! unknit that threatening unkind brow,
And dart not scornful glances from those eyes
To wound thy lord, thy king, thy governor.
It blots thy beauty as frosts do bite the meads,
Confounds thy fame as whirlwinds shake fair buds,
And in no sense is meet or amiable.
A woman mov'd is like a fountain troubled-
Muddy, ill-seeming, thick, bereft of beauty;
And while it is so, none so dry or thirsty
Will deign to sip or touch one drop of it.
Thy husband is thy lord, thy life, thy keeper,
Thy head, thy sovereign; one that cares for thee,
And for thy maintenance commits his body
To painful labour both by sea and land,
To watch the night in storms, the day in cold,
Whilst thou liest warm at home, secure and safe;
And craves no other tribute at thy hands
But love, fair looks, and true obedience-
Too little payment for so great a debt.
Such duty as the subject owes the prince,
Even such a woman oweth to her husband;
And when she is froward, peevish, sullen, sour,
And not obedient to his honest will,
What is she but a foul contending rebel
And graceless traitor to her loving lord?
I am asham'd that women are so simple
To offer war where they should kneel for peace;
Or seek for rule, supremacy, and sway,
When they are bound to serve, love, and obey.
Why are our bodies soft and weak and smooth,
Unapt to toil and trouble in the world,
But that our soft conditions and our hearts
Should well agree with our external parts?
Come, come, you forward and unable worms!
My mind hath been as big as one of yours,
My heart as great, my reason haply more,
To bandy word for word and frown for frown;
But now I see our lances are but straws,
Our strength as weak, our weakness past compare,
That seeming to be most which we indeed least are.
Then vail your stomachs, for it is no boot,
And place your hands below your husband's foot;
In token of which duty, if he please,
My hand is ready, may it do him ease.

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