Speeches (Lines) for Caesar
in "Julius Caesar"

Total: 42

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,82

Calpurnia!

2

I,2,84

Calpurnia!

3

I,2,86

Stand you directly in Antonius' way,
When he doth run his course. Antonius!

4

I,2,89

Forget not, in your speed, Antonius,
To touch Calpurnia; for our elders say,
The barren, touched in this holy chase,
Shake off their sterile curse.

5

I,2,95

Set on; and leave no ceremony out.

6

I,2,98

Ha! who calls?

7

I,2,100

Who is it in the press that calls on me?
I hear a tongue, shriller than all the music,
Cry 'Caesar!' Speak; Caesar is turn'd to hear.

8

I,2,104

What man is that?

9

I,2,106

Set him before me; let me see his face.

10

I,2,108

What say'st thou to me now? speak once again.

11

I,2,110

He is a dreamer; let us leave him: pass.

12

I,2,282

Antonius!

13

I,2,284

Let me have men about me that are fat;
Sleek-headed men and such as sleep o' nights:
Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look;
He thinks too much: such men are dangerous.

14

I,2,290

Would he were fatter! But I fear him not:
Yet if my name were liable to fear,
I do not know the man I should avoid
So soon as that spare Cassius. He reads much;
He is a great observer and he looks
Quite through the deeds of men: he loves no plays,
As thou dost, Antony; he hears no music;
Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort
As if he mock'd himself and scorn'd his spirit
That could be moved to smile at any thing.
Such men as he be never at heart's ease
Whiles they behold a greater than themselves,
And therefore are they very dangerous.
I rather tell thee what is to be fear'd
Than what I fear; for always I am Caesar.
Come on my right hand, for this ear is deaf,
And tell me truly what thou think'st of him.

15

II,2,973

Nor heaven nor earth have been at peace to-night:
Thrice hath Calpurnia in her sleep cried out,
'Help, ho! they murder Caesar!' Who's within?

16

II,2,978

Go bid the priests do present sacrifice
And bring me their opinions of success.

17

II,2,985

Caesar shall forth: the things that threaten'd me
Ne'er look'd but on my back; when they shall see
The face of Caesar, they are vanished.

18

II,2,1002

What can be avoided
Whose end is purposed by the mighty gods?
Yet Caesar shall go forth; for these predictions
Are to the world in general as to Caesar.

19

II,2,1008

Cowards die many times before their deaths;
The valiant never taste of death but once.
Of all the wonders that I yet have heard.
It seems to me most strange that men should fear;
Seeing that death, a necessary end,
Will come when it will come.
[Re-enter Servant]
What say the augurers?

20

II,2,1019

The gods do this in shame of cowardice:
Caesar should be a beast without a heart,
If he should stay at home to-day for fear.
No, Caesar shall not: danger knows full well
That Caesar is more dangerous than he:
We are two lions litter'd in one day,
And I the elder and more terrible:
And Caesar shall go forth.

21

II,2,1034

Mark Antony shall say I am not well,
And, for thy humour, I will stay at home.
[Enter DECIUS BRUTUS]
Here's Decius Brutus, he shall tell them so.

22

II,2,1040

And you are come in very happy time,
To bear my greeting to the senators
And tell them that I will not come to-day:
Cannot, is false, and that I dare not, falser:
I will not come to-day: tell them so, Decius.

23

II,2,1046

Shall Caesar send a lie?
Have I in conquest stretch'd mine arm so far,
To be afraid to tell graybeards the truth?
Decius, go tell them Caesar will not come.

24

II,2,1052

The cause is in my will: I will not come;
That is enough to satisfy the senate.
But for your private satisfaction,
Because I love you, I will let you know:
Calpurnia here, my wife, stays me at home:
She dreamt to-night she saw my statua,
Which, like a fountain with an hundred spouts,
Did run pure blood: and many lusty Romans
Came smiling, and did bathe their hands in it:
And these does she apply for warnings, and portents,
And evils imminent; and on her knee
Hath begg'd that I will stay at home to-day.

25

II,2,1072

And this way have you well expounded it.

26

II,2,1086

How foolish do your fears seem now, Calpurnia!
I am ashamed I did yield to them.
Give me my robe, for I will go.
[Enter PUBLIUS, BRUTUS, LIGARIUS, METELLUS, CASCA,
TREBONIUS, and CINNA]

And look where Publius is come to fetch me.

27

II,2,1093

Welcome, Publius.
What, Brutus, are you stirr'd so early too?
Good morrow, Casca. Caius Ligarius,
Caesar was ne'er so much your enemy
As that same ague which hath made you lean.
What is 't o'clock?

28

II,2,1100

I thank you for your pains and courtesy.
[Enter ANTONY]
See! Antony, that revels long o' nights,
Is notwithstanding up. Good morrow, Antony.

29

II,2,1105

Bid them prepare within:
I am to blame to be thus waited for.
Now, Cinna: now, Metellus: what, Trebonius!
I have an hour's talk in store for you;
Remember that you call on me to-day:
Be near me, that I may remember you.

30

II,2,1115

Good friends, go in, and taste some wine with me;
And we, like friends, will straightway go together.

31

III,1,1196

[To the Soothsayer] The ides of March are come.

32

III,1,1203

What touches us ourself shall be last served.

33

III,1,1205

What, is the fellow mad?

34

III,1,1233

Are we all ready? What is now amiss
That Caesar and his senate must redress?

35

III,1,1239

I must prevent thee, Cimber.
These couchings and these lowly courtesies
Might fire the blood of ordinary men,
And turn pre-ordinance and first decree
Into the law of children. Be not fond,
To think that Caesar bears such rebel blood
That will be thaw'd from the true quality
With that which melteth fools; I mean, sweet words,
Low-crooked court'sies and base spaniel-fawning.
Thy brother by decree is banished:
If thou dost bend and pray and fawn for him,
I spurn thee like a cur out of my way.
Know, Caesar doth not wrong, nor without cause
Will he be satisfied.

36

III,1,1259

What, Brutus!

37

III,1,1280

Hence! wilt thou lift up Olympus?

38

III,1,1282

Doth not Brutus bootless kneel?

39

III,1,1286

Et tu, Brute! Then fall, Caesar.

40

IV,3,2311

Thy evil spirit, Brutus.

41

IV,3,2313

To tell thee thou shalt see me at Philippi.

42

IV,3,2315

Ay, at Philippi.

Return to the "Julius Caesar" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS