Speeches (Lines) for Juliet
in "Romeo and Juliet"

Total: 118

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,386

How now! who calls?

2

I,3,388

Madam, I am here.
What is your will?

3

I,3,443

And stint thou too, I pray thee, nurse, say I.

4

I,3,451

It is an honour that I dream not of.

5

I,3,482

I'll look to like, if looking liking move:
But no more deep will I endart mine eye...

6

I,5,723

Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,
Which mannerly devotion shows in this;...

7

I,5,728

Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer.

8

I,5,731

Saints do not move, though grant for prayers' sake.

9

I,5,734

Then have my lips the sin that they have took.

10

I,5,737

You kiss by the book.

11

I,5,758

Come hither, nurse. What is yond gentleman?

12

I,5,760

What's he that now is going out of door?

13

I,5,762

What's he that follows there, that would not dance?

14

I,5,764

Go ask his name: if he be married.
My grave is like to be my wedding bed.

15

I,5,768

My only love sprung from my only hate!
Too early seen unknown, and known too late!...

16

I,5,773

A rhyme I learn'd even now
Of one I danced withal.

17

II,2,871

Ay me!

18

II,2,880

O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;...

19

II,2,885

'Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague....

20

II,2,900

What man art thou that thus bescreen'd in night
So stumblest on my counsel?

21

II,2,907

My ears have not yet drunk a hundred words
Of that tongue's utterance, yet I know the sound:...

22

II,2,911

How camest thou hither, tell me, and wherefore?
The orchard walls are high and hard to climb,...

23

II,2,919

If they do see thee, they will murder thee.

24

II,2,923

I would not for the world they saw thee here.

25

II,2,928

By whose direction found'st thou out this place?

26

II,2,934

Thou know'st the mask of night is on my face,
Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek...

27

II,2,958

O, swear not by the moon, the inconstant moon,
That monthly changes in her circled orb,...

28

II,2,962

Do not swear at all;
Or, if thou wilt, swear by thy gracious self,...

29

II,2,967

Well, do not swear: although I joy in thee,
I have no joy of this contract to-night:...

30

II,2,977

What satisfaction canst thou have to-night?

31

II,2,979

I gave thee mine before thou didst request it:
And yet I would it were to give again.

32

II,2,982

But to be frank, and give it thee again.
And yet I wish but for the thing I have:...

33

II,2,996

Three words, dear Romeo, and good night indeed.
If that thy bent of love be honourable,...

34

II,2,1004

I come, anon.—But if thou mean'st not well,
I do beseech thee—

35

II,2,1007

By and by, I come:—
To cease thy suit, and leave me to my grief:...

36

II,2,1011

A thousand times good night!

37

II,2,1019

Hist! Romeo, hist! O, for a falconer's voice,
To lure this tassel-gentle back again!...

38

II,2,1028

Romeo!

39

II,2,1030

At what o'clock to-morrow
Shall I send to thee?

40

II,2,1033

I will not fail: 'tis twenty years till then.
I have forgot why I did call thee back.

41

II,2,1036

I shall forget, to have thee still stand there,
Remembering how I love thy company.

42

II,2,1040

'Tis almost morning; I would have thee gone:
And yet no further than a wanton's bird;...

43

II,2,1047

Sweet, so would I:
Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing....

44

II,5,1375

The clock struck nine when I did send the nurse;
In half an hour she promised to return....

45

II,5,1398

Now, good sweet nurse,—O Lord, why look'st thou sad?
Though news be sad, yet tell them merrily;...

46

II,5,1404

I would thou hadst my bones, and I thy news:
Nay, come, I pray thee, speak; good, good nurse, speak.

47

II,5,1408

How art thou out of breath, when thou hast breath
To say to me that thou art out of breath?...

48

II,5,1423

No, no: but all this did I know before.
What says he of our marriage? what of that?

49

II,5,1430

I' faith, I am sorry that thou art not well.
Sweet, sweet, sweet nurse, tell me, what says my love?

50

II,5,1435

Where is my mother! why, she is within;
Where should she be? How oddly thou repliest!...

51

II,5,1443

Here's such a coil! come, what says Romeo?

52

II,5,1445

I have.

53

II,5,1456

Hie to high fortune! Honest nurse, farewell.

54

II,6,1480

Good even to my ghostly confessor.

55

II,6,1482

As much to him, else is his thanks too much.

56

II,6,1489

Conceit, more rich in matter than in words,
Brags of his substance, not of ornament:...

57

III,2,1719

Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds,
Towards Phoebus' lodging: such a wagoner...

58

III,2,1757

Ay me! what news? why dost thou wring thy hands?

59

III,2,1761

Can heaven be so envious?

60

III,2,1765

What devil art thou, that dost torment me thus?
This torture should be roar'd in dismal hell....

61

III,2,1779

O, break, my heart! poor bankrupt, break at once!
To prison, eyes, ne'er look on liberty!...

62

III,2,1786

What storm is this that blows so contrary?
Is Romeo slaughter'd, and is Tybalt dead?...

63

III,2,1793

O God! did Romeo's hand shed Tybalt's blood?

64

III,2,1795

O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?...

65

III,2,1814

Blister'd be thy tongue
For such a wish! he was not born to shame:...

66

III,2,1821

Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,...

67

III,2,1854

Wash they his wounds with tears: mine shall be spent,
When theirs are dry, for Romeo's banishment....

68

III,2,1866

O, find him! give this ring to my true knight,
And bid him come to take his last farewell.

69

III,5,2098

Wilt thou be gone? it is not yet near day:
It was the nightingale, and not the lark,...

70

III,5,2109

Yon light is not day-light, I know it, I:
It is some meteor that the sun exhales,...

71

III,5,2123

It is, it is: hie hence, be gone, away!
It is the lark that sings so out of tune,...

72

III,5,2136

Nurse?

73

III,5,2140

Then, window, let day in, and let life out.

74

III,5,2143

Art thou gone so? love, lord, ay, husband, friend!
I must hear from thee every day in the hour,...

75

III,5,2151

O think'st thou we shall ever meet again?

76

III,5,2154

O God, I have an ill-divining soul!
Methinks I see thee, now thou art below,...

77

III,5,2161

O fortune, fortune! all men call thee fickle:
If thou art fickle, what dost thou with him....

78

III,5,2167

Who is't that calls? is it my lady mother?
Is she not down so late, or up so early?...

79

III,5,2172

Madam, I am not well.

80

III,5,2178

Yet let me weep for such a feeling loss.

81

III,5,2181

Feeling so the loss,
Cannot choose but ever weep the friend.

82

III,5,2185

What villain madam?

83

III,5,2187

[Aside] Villain and he be many miles asunder.—
God Pardon him! I do, with all my heart;...

84

III,5,2191

Ay, madam, from the reach of these my hands:
Would none but I might venge my cousin's death!

85

III,5,2199

Indeed, I never shall be satisfied
With Romeo, till I behold him—dead—...

86

III,5,2211

And joy comes well in such a needy time:
What are they, I beseech your ladyship?

87

III,5,2217

Madam, in happy time, what day is that?

88

III,5,2222

Now, by Saint Peter's Church and Peter too,
He shall not make me there a joyful bride....

89

III,5,2253

Not proud, you have; but thankful, that you have:
Proud can I never be of what I hate;...

90

III,5,2266

Good father, I beseech you on my knees,
Hear me with patience but to speak a word.

91

III,5,2311

Is there no pity sitting in the clouds,
That sees into the bottom of my grief?...

92

III,5,2320

O God!—O nurse, how shall this be prevented?
My husband is on earth, my faith in heaven;...

93

III,5,2343

Speakest thou from thy heart?

94

III,5,2346

Amen!

95

III,5,2348

Well, thou hast comforted me marvellous much.
Go in: and tell my lady I am gone,...

96

III,5,2354

Ancient damnation! O most wicked fiend!
Is it more sin to wish me thus forsworn,...

97

IV,1,2383

That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

98

IV,1,2385

What must be shall be.

99

IV,1,2388

To answer that, I should confess to you.

100

IV,1,2390

I will confess to you that I love him.

101

IV,1,2392

If I do so, it will be of more price,
Being spoke behind your back, than to your face.

102

IV,1,2395

The tears have got small victory by that;
For it was bad enough before their spite.

103

IV,1,2398

That is no slander, sir, which is a truth;
And what I spake, I spake it to my face.

104

IV,1,2401

It may be so, for it is not mine own.
Are you at leisure, holy father, now;...

105

IV,1,2410

O shut the door! and when thou hast done so,
Come weep with me; past hope, past cure, past help!

106

IV,1,2416

Tell me not, friar, that thou hear'st of this,
Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it:...

107

IV,1,2443

O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris,
From off the battlements of yonder tower;...

108

IV,1,2487

Give me, give me! O, tell not me of fear!

109

IV,1,2491

Love give me strength! and strength shall help afford.
Farewell, dear father!

110

IV,2,2514

Where I have learn'd me to repent the sin
Of disobedient opposition...

111

IV,2,2522

I met the youthful lord at Laurence' cell;
And gave him what becomed love I might,...

112

IV,2,2530

Nurse, will you go with me into my closet,
To help me sort such needful ornaments...

113

IV,3,2549

Ay, those attires are best: but, gentle nurse,
I pray thee, leave me to myself to-night,...

114

IV,3,2556

No, madam; we have cull'd such necessaries
As are behoveful for our state to-morrow:...

115

IV,3,2565

Farewell! God knows when we shall meet again.
I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,...

116

V,3,3107

O comfortable friar! where is my lord?
I do remember well where I should be,...

117

V,3,3122

Go, get thee hence, for I will not away.
[Exit FRIAR LAURENCE]...

118

V,3,3133

Yea, noise? then I'll be brief. O happy dagger!
[Snatching ROMEO's dagger]...

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