Speeches (Lines) for Hortensio
in "Taming of the Shrew"

Total: 70

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,355

Mates, maid! How mean you that? No mates for you,
Unless you were of gentler, milder mould.

2

I,1,362

From all such devils, good Lord deliver us!

3

I,1,381

Signior Baptista, will you be so strange?
Sorry am I that our good will effects
Bianca's grief.

4

I,1,409

So Will I, Signior Gremio; but a word, I pray. Though
the nature of our quarrel yet never brook'd parle, know now, upon
advice, it toucheth us both- that we may yet again have access to
our fair mistress, and be happy rivals in Bianca's love- to
labour and effect one thing specially.

5

I,1,415

Marry, sir, to get a husband for her sister.

6

I,1,417

I say a husband.

7

I,1,420

Tush, Gremio! Though it pass your patience and mine to
endure her loud alarums, why, man, there be good fellows in the
world, an a man could light on them, would take her with all
faults, and money enough.

8

I,1,426

Faith, as you say, there's small choice in rotten
apples. But, come; since this bar in law makes us friends, it
shall be so far forth friendly maintain'd till by helping
Baptista's eldest daughter to a husband we set his youngest free
for a husband, and then have to't afresh. Sweet Bianca! Happy man
be his dole! He that runs fastest gets the ring. How say you,
Signior Gremio?

9

I,2,573

How now! what's the matter? My old friend Grumio and my
good friend Petruchio! How do you all at Verona?

10

I,2,577

Alla nostra casa ben venuto,
Molto honorato signor mio Petruchio.
Rise, Grumio, rise; we will compound this quarrel.

11

I,2,594

Petruchio, patience; I am Grumio's pledge;
Why, this's a heavy chance 'twixt him and you,
Your ancient, trusty, pleasant servant Grumio.
And tell me now, sweet friend, what happy gale
Blows you to Padua here from old Verona?

12

I,2,608

Petruchio, shall I then come roundly to thee
And wish thee to a shrewd ill-favour'd wife?
Thou'dst thank me but a little for my counsel,
And yet I'll promise thee she shall be rich,
And very rich; but th'art too much my friend,
And I'll not wish thee to her.

13

I,2,631

Petruchio, since we are stepp'd thus far in,
I will continue that I broach'd in jest.
I can, Petruchio, help thee to a wife
With wealth enough, and young and beauteous;
Brought up as best becomes a gentlewoman;
Her only fault, and that is faults enough,
Is- that she is intolerable curst,
And shrewd and froward so beyond all measure
That, were my state far worser than it is,
I would not wed her for a mine of gold.

14

I,2,645

Her father is Baptista Minola,
An affable and courteous gentleman;
Her name is Katherina Minola,
Renown'd in Padua for her scolding tongue.

15

I,2,663

Tarry, Petruchio, I must go with thee,
For in Baptista's keep my treasure is.
He hath the jewel of my life in hold,
His youngest daughter, beautiful Bianca;
And her withholds from me, and other more,
Suitors to her and rivals in my love;
Supposing it a thing impossible-
For those defects I have before rehears'd-
That ever Katherina will be woo'd.
Therefore this order hath Baptista ta'en,
That none shall have access unto Bianca
Till Katherine the curst have got a husband.

16

I,2,677

Now shall my friend Petruchio do me grace,
And offer me disguis'd in sober robes
To old Baptista as a schoolmaster
Well seen in music, to instruct Bianca;
That so I may by this device at least
Have leave and leisure to make love to her,
And unsuspected court her by herself.
Enter GREMIO with LUCENTIO disguised as CAMBIO

17

I,2,688

Peace, Grumio! It is the rival of my love. Petruchio,
stand by awhile.

18

I,2,710

Grumio, mum! [Coming forward]
God save you, Signior Gremio!

19

I,2,720

'Tis well; and I have met a gentleman
Hath promis'd me to help me to another,
A fine musician to instruct our mistress;
So shall I no whit be behind in duty
To fair Bianca, so beloved of me.

20

I,2,727

Gremio, 'tis now no time to vent our love.
Listen to me, and if you speak me fair
I'll tell you news indifferent good for either.
Here is a gentleman whom by chance I met,
Upon agreement from us to his liking,
Will undertake to woo curst Katherine;
Yea, and to marry her, if her dowry please.

21

I,2,765

I promis'd we would be contributors
And bear his charge of wooing, whatsoe'er.

22

I,2,780

Sir, a word ere you go.
Are you a suitor to the maid you talk of, yea or no?

23

I,2,790

That she's the chosen of Signior Hortensio.

24

I,2,804

Sir, let me be so bold as ask you,
Did you yet ever see Baptista's daughter?

25

I,2,824

Sir, you say well, and well you do conceive;
And since you do profess to be a suitor,
You must, as we do, gratify this gentleman,
To whom we all rest generally beholding.

26

I,2,834

The motion's good indeed, and be it so.
Petruchio, I shall be your ben venuto. Exeunt

27

II,1,987

For fear, I promise you, if I look pale.

28

II,1,989

I think she'll sooner prove a soldier:
Iron may hold with her, but never lutes.

29

II,1,992

Why, no; for she hath broke the lute to me.
I did but tell her she mistook her frets,
And bow'd her hand to teach her fingering,
When, with a most impatient devilish spirit,
'Frets, call you these?' quoth she 'I'll fume with them.'
And with that word she struck me on the head,
And through the instrument my pate made way;
And there I stood amazed for a while,
As on a pillory, looking through the lute,
While she did call me rascal fiddler
And twangling Jack, with twenty such vile terms,
As she had studied to misuse me so.

30

III,1,1271

But, wrangling pedant, this is
The patroness of heavenly harmony.
Then give me leave to have prerogative;
And when in music we have spent an hour,
Your lecture shall have leisure for as much.

31

III,1,1282

Sirrah, I will not bear these braves of thine.

32

III,1,1291

You'll leave his lecture when I am in tune?

33

III,1,1303

Madam, my instrument's in tune.

34

III,1,1310

Madam, 'tis now in tune.

35

III,1,1312

The bass is right; 'tis the base knave that jars.
[Aside] How fiery and forward our pedant is!
Now, for my life, the knave doth court my love.
Pedascule, I'll watch you better yet.

36

III,1,1324

[To LUCENTIO] You may go walk and give me leave
awhile;
My lessons make no music in three Parts.

37

III,1,1330

Madam, before you touch the instrument
To learn the order of my fingering,
I must begin with rudiments of art,
To teach you gamut in a briefer sort,
More pleasant, pithy, and effectual,
Than hath been taught by any of my trade;
And there it is in writing fairly drawn.

38

III,1,1338

Yet read the gamut of Hortensio.

39

III,1,1357

But I have cause to pry into this pedant;
Methinks he looks as though he were in love.
Yet if thy thoughts, Bianca, be so humble
To cast thy wand'ring eyes on every stale-
Seize thee that list. If once I find thee ranging,
Hortensio will be quit with thee by changing. Exit

40

IV,2,1827

Sir, to satisfy you in what I have said,
Stand by and mark the manner of his teaching.

41

IV,2,1837

Quick proceeders, marry! Now tell me, I pray,
You that durst swear that your Mistress Bianca
Lov'd none in the world so well as Lucentio.

42

IV,2,1842

Mistake no more; I am not Licio.
Nor a musician as I seem to be;
But one that scorn to live in this disguise
For such a one as leaves a gentleman
And makes a god of such a cullion.
Know, sir, that I am call'd Hortensio.

43

IV,2,1853

See, how they kiss and court! Signior Lucentio,
Here is my hand, and here I firmly vow
Never to woo her more, but do forswear her,
As one unworthy all the former favours
That I have fondly flatter'd her withal.

44

IV,2,1861

Would all the world but he had quite forsworn!
For me, that I may surely keep mine oath,
I will be married to a wealtlly widow
Ere three days pass, which hath as long lov'd me
As I have lov'd this proud disdainful haggard.
And so farewell, Signior Lucentio.
Kindness in women, not their beauteous looks,
Shall win my love; and so I take my leave,
In resolution as I swore before. Exit

45

IV,3,1995

Mistress, what cheer?

46

IV,3,2008

Signior Petruchio, fie! you are to blame.
Come, Mistress Kate, I'll bear you company.

47

IV,3,2036

[Aside] That will not be in haste.

48

IV,3,2057

[Aside] I see she's like to have neither cap nor gown.

49

IV,3,2113

God-a-mercy, Grumio! Then he shall have no odds.

50

IV,3,2125

Tailor, I'll pay thee for thy gown to-morrow;
Take no unkindness of his hasty words.
Away, I say; commend me to thy master. Exit TAILOR

51

IV,3,2155

Why, so this gallant will command the sun.

52

IV,5,2277

Say as he says, or we shall never go.

53

IV,5,2290

Petruchio, go thy ways, the field is won.

54

IV,5,2303

'A will make the man mad, to make a woman of him.

55

IV,5,2342

I do assure thee, father, so it is.

56

IV,5,2346

Well, Petruchio, this has put me in heart.
Have to my widow; and if she be froward,
Then hast thou taught Hortensio to be untoward. Exit

57

V,2,2503

For both our sakes I would that word were true.

58

V,2,2513

My widow says thus she conceives her tale.

59

V,2,2524

To her, widow!

60

V,2,2526

That's my office.

61

V,2,2551

Confess, confess; hath he not hit you here?

62

V,2,2562

Content. What's the wager?

63

V,2,2568

Content.

64

V,2,2570

Who shall begin?

65

V,2,2585

Sirrah Biondello, go and entreat my wife
To come to me forthwith. Exit BIONDELLO

66

V,2,2589

I am afraid, sir,
Do what you can, yours will not be entreated.
[Re-enter BIONDELLO]
Now, where's my wife?

67

V,2,2599

I know her answer.

68

V,2,2601

She will not.

69

V,2,2613

And so it is. I wonder what it bodes.

70

V,2,2697

Now go thy ways; thou hast tam'd a curst shrow.

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