Speeches (Lines) for Horatio
in "Hamlet"

Total: 109

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,18

Friends to this ground.

2

I,1,28

A piece of him.

3

I,1,39

Tush, tush, 'twill not appear.

4

I,1,44

Well, sit we down,
And let us hear Bernardo speak of this.

5

I,1,56

Most like. It harrows me with fear and wonder.

6

I,1,59

What art thou that usurp'st this time of night
Together with that fair and warlike form...

7

I,1,65

Stay! Speak, speak! I charge thee speak!

8

I,1,71

Before my God, I might not this believe
Without the sensible and true avouch...

9

I,1,75

As thou art to thyself.
Such was the very armour he had on...

10

I,1,83

In what particular thought to work I know not;
But, in the gross and scope of my opinion,...

11

I,1,96

That can I.
At least, the whisper goes so. Our last king,...

12

I,1,129

A mote it is to trouble the mind's eye.
In the most high and palmy state of Rome,...

13

I,1,161

Do, if it will not stand.

14

I,1,163

'Tis here!

15

I,1,171

And then it started, like a guilty thing
Upon a fearful summons. I have heard...

16

I,1,188

So have I heard and do in part believe it.
But look, the morn, in russet mantle clad,...

17

I,2,365

Hail to your lordship!

18

I,2,368

The same, my lord, and your poor servant ever.

19

I,2,375

A truant disposition, good my lord.

20

I,2,382

My lord, I came to see your father's funeral.

21

I,2,385

Indeed, my lord, it followed hard upon.

22

I,2,391

O, where, my lord?

23

I,2,393

I saw him once. He was a goodly king.

24

I,2,396

My lord, I think I saw him yesternight.

25

I,2,398

My lord, the King your father.

26

I,2,400

Season your admiration for a while
With an attent ear, till I may deliver...

27

I,2,405

Two nights together had these gentlemen
(Marcellus and Bernardo) on their watch...

28

I,2,425

My lord, I did;
But answer made it none. Yet once methought...

29

I,2,433

As I do live, my honour'd lord, 'tis true;
And we did think it writ down in our duty...

30

I,2,444

O, yes, my lord! He wore his beaver up.

31

I,2,446

A countenance more in sorrow than in anger.

32

I,2,448

Nay, very pale.

33

I,2,450

Most constantly.

34

I,2,452

It would have much amaz'd you.

35

I,2,454

While one with moderate haste might tell a hundred.

36

I,2,456

Not when I saw't.

37

I,2,458

It was, as I have seen it in his life,
A sable silver'd.

38

I,2,462

I warr'nt it will.

39

I,4,627

It is a nipping and an eager air.

40

I,4,629

I think it lacks of twelve.

41

I,4,631

Indeed? I heard it not. It then draws near the season
Wherein the spirit held his wont to walk....

42

I,4,640

Is it a custom?

43

I,4,667

Look, my lord, it comes!

44

I,4,688

It beckons you to go away with it,
As if it some impartment did desire...

45

I,4,694

No, by no means!

46

I,4,696

Do not, my lord!

47

I,4,702

What if it tempt you toward the flood, my lord,
Or to the dreadful summit of the cliff...

48

I,4,716

Be rul'd. You shall not go.

49

I,4,725

He waxes desperate with imagination.

50

I,4,727

Have after. To what issue will this come?

51

I,4,729

Heaven will direct it.

52

I,5,851

[within] My lord, my lord!

53

I,5,854

Heaven secure him!

54

I,5,859

What news, my lord?

55

I,5,861

Good my lord, tell it.

56

I,5,863

Not I, my lord, by heaven!

57

I,5,870

There needs no ghost, my lord, come from the grave
To tell us this.

58

I,5,879

These are but wild and whirling words, my lord.

59

I,5,882

There's no offence, my lord.

60

I,5,890

What is't, my lord? We will.

61

I,5,894

In faith,
My lord, not I.

62

I,5,905

Propose the oath, my lord.

63

I,5,917

O day and night, but this is wondrous strange!

64

III,2,1931

Here, sweet lord, at your service.

65

III,2,1934

O, my dear lord!

66

III,2,1967

Well, my lord.
If he steal aught the whilst this play is playing,...

67

III,2,2166

Half a share.

68

III,2,2172

You might have rhym'd.

69

III,2,2175

Very well, my lord.

70

III,2,2177

I did very well note him.

71

IV,5,2871

'Twere good she were spoken with; for she may strew
Dangerous conjectures in ill-breeding minds.

72

IV,6,3100

What are they that would speak with me?

73

IV,6,3102

Let them come in.
[Exit Attendant.]...

74

IV,6,3108

Let him bless thee too.

75

IV,6,3112

[reads the letter] 'Horatio, when thou shalt have overlook'd
this, give these fellows some means to the King. They have...

76

V,1,3409

Custom hath made it in him a property of easiness.

77

V,1,3423

It might, my lord.

78

V,1,3428

Ay, my lord.

79

V,1,3453

Not a jot more, my lord.

80

V,1,3455

Ay, my lord, And of calveskins too.

81

V,1,3526

What's that, my lord?

82

V,1,3528

E'en so.

83

V,1,3531

E'en so, my lord.

84

V,1,3535

'Twere to consider too curiously, to consider so.

85

V,1,3608

Good my lord, be quiet.

86

V,2,3652

Remember it, my lord!

87

V,2,3661

That is most certain.

88

V,2,3676

Is't possible?

89

V,2,3679

I beseech you.

90

V,2,3689

Ay, good my lord.

91

V,2,3700

How was this seal'd?

92

V,2,3709

So Guildenstern and Rosencrantz go to't.

93

V,2,3716

Why, what a king is this!

94

V,2,3725

It must be shortly known to him from England
What is the issue of the business there.

95

V,2,3735

Peace! Who comes here?

96

V,2,3740

[aside to Hamlet] No, my good lord.

97

V,2,3774

[aside to Hamlet] Is't not possible to understand in another
tongue? You will do't, sir, really.

98

V,2,3778

[aside] His purse is empty already. All's golden words are
spent.

99

V,2,3799

[aside to Hamlet] I knew you must be edified by the margent
ere you had done.

100

V,2,3823

This lapwing runs away with the shell on his head.

101

V,2,3844

You will lose this wager, my lord.

102

V,2,3848

Nay, good my lord—

103

V,2,3851

If your mind dislike anything, obey it. I will forestall their
repair hither and say you are not fit.

104

V,2,3960

They bleed on both sides. How is it, my lord?

105

V,2,3999

Never believe it.
I am more an antique Roman than a Dane....

106

V,2,4021

Now cracks a noble heart. Good night, sweet prince,
And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest!...

107

V,2,4027

What is it you will see?
If aught of woe or wonder, cease your search.

108

V,2,4039

Not from his mouth,
Had it th' ability of life to thank you....

109

V,2,4059

Of that I shall have also cause to speak,
And from his mouth whose voice will draw on more....

Return to the "Hamlet" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS