Speeches (Lines) for Hero
in "Much Ado about Nothing"

Total: 44

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,33

My cousin means Signior Benedick of Padua.

2

II,1,403

He is of a very melancholy disposition.

3

II,1,476

So you walk softly and look sweetly and say nothing,
I am yours for the walk; and especially when I walk away.

4

II,1,479

I may say so, when I please.

5

II,1,481

When I like your favour; for God defend the lute
should be like the case!

6

II,1,484

Why, then, your visor should be thatched.

7

II,1,746

I will do any modest office, my lord, to help my
cousin to a good husband.

8

III,1,1073

Good Margaret, run thee to the parlor;
There shalt thou find my cousin Beatrice...

9

III,1,1088

Now, Ursula, when Beatrice doth come,
As we do trace this alley up and down,...

10

III,1,1107

Then go we near her, that her ear lose nothing
Of the false sweet bait that we lay for it....

11

III,1,1115

So says the prince and my new-trothed lord.

12

III,1,1117

They did entreat me to acquaint her of it;
But I persuaded them, if they loved Benedick,...

13

III,1,1124

O god of love! I know he doth deserve
As much as may be yielded to a man:...

14

III,1,1137

Why, you speak truth. I never yet saw man,
How wise, how noble, young, how rarely featured,...

15

III,1,1150

No, not to be so odd and from all fashions
As Beatrice is, cannot be commendable:...

16

III,1,1160

No; rather I will go to Benedick
And counsel him to fight against his passion....

17

III,1,1170

He is the only man of Italy.
Always excepted my dear Claudio.

18

III,1,1176

Indeed, he hath an excellent good name.

19

III,1,1179

Why, every day, to-morrow. Come, go in:
I'll show thee some attires, and have thy counsel...

20

III,1,1183

If it proves so, then loving goes by haps:
Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps.

21

III,4,1490

Good Ursula, wake my cousin Beatrice, and desire
her to rise.

22

III,4,1493

And bid her come hither.

23

III,4,1497

No, pray thee, good Meg, I'll wear this.

24

III,4,1500

My cousin's a fool, and thou art another: I'll wear
none but this.

25

III,4,1506

O, that exceeds, they say.

26

III,4,1513

God give me joy to wear it! for my heart is
exceeding heavy.

27

III,4,1516

Fie upon thee! art not ashamed?

28

III,4,1527

Good morrow, coz.

29

III,4,1529

Why how now? do you speak in the sick tune?

30

III,4,1545

These gloves the count sent me; they are an
excellent perfume.

31

III,4,1556

There thou prickest her with a thistle.

32

III,4,1578

Help to dress me, good coz, good Meg, good Ursula.

33

IV,1,1651

I do.

34

IV,1,1656

None, my lord.

35

IV,1,1696

And seem'd I ever otherwise to you?

36

IV,1,1703

Is my lord well, that he doth speak so wide?

37

IV,1,1711

True! O God!

38

IV,1,1720

O, God defend me! how am I beset!
What kind of catechising call you this?

39

IV,1,1723

Is it not Hero? Who can blot that name
With any just reproach?

40

IV,1,1730

I talk'd with no man at that hour, my lord.

41

IV,1,1828

They know that do accuse me; I know none:
If I know more of any man alive...

42

V,4,2609

And when I lived, I was your other wife:
[Unmasking]...

43

V,4,2613

Nothing certainer:
One Hero died defiled, but I do live,...

44

V,4,2642

And here's another
Writ in my cousin's hand, stolen from her pocket,...

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