Speeches (Lines) for Henry V
in "Henry V"

Total: 147

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,143

Where is my gracious Lord of Canterbury?

2

I,2,145

Send for him, good uncle.

3

I,2,147

Not yet, my cousin: we would be resolved,
Before we hear him, of some things of weight...

4

I,2,153

Sure, we thank you.
My learned lord, we pray you to proceed...

5

I,2,241

May I with right and conscience make this claim?

6

I,2,281

We must not only arm to invade the French,
But lay down our proportions to defend...

7

I,2,288

We do not mean the coursing snatchers only,
But fear the main intendment of the Scot,...

8

I,2,367

Call in the messengers sent from the Dauphin.
[Exeunt some Attendants]...

9

I,2,389

We are no tyrant, but a Christian king;
Unto whose grace our passion is as subject...

10

I,2,407

What treasure, uncle?

11

I,2,409

We are glad the Dauphin is so pleasant with us;
His present and your pains we thank you for:...

12

I,2,450

We hope to make the sender blush at it.
Therefore, my lords, omit no happy hour...

13

II,2,647

Now sits the wind fair, and we will aboard.
My Lord of Cambridge, and my kind Lord of Masham,...

14

II,2,655

I doubt not that; since we are well persuaded
We carry not a heart with us from hence...

15

II,2,667

We therefore have great cause of thankfulness;
And shall forget the office of our hand,...

16

II,2,674

We judge no less. Uncle of Exeter,
Enlarge the man committed yesterday,...

17

II,2,682

O, let us yet be merciful.

18

II,2,687

Alas, your too much love and care of me
Are heavy orisons 'gainst this poor wretch!...

19

II,2,701

Then, Richard Earl of Cambridge, there is yours;
There yours, Lord Scroop of Masham; and, sir knight,...

20

II,2,715

The mercy that was quick in us but late,
By your own counsel is suppress'd and kill'd:...

21

II,2,802

God quit you in his mercy! Hear your sentence.
You have conspired against our royal person,...

22

III,1,1092

Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more;
Or close the wall up with our English dead....

23

III,3,1273

How yet resolves the governor of the town?
This is the latest parle we will admit;...

24

III,3,1323

Open your gates. Come, uncle Exeter,
Go you and enter Harfleur; there remain,...

25

III,6,1553

How now, Fluellen! camest thou from the bridge?

26

III,6,1562

What men have you lost, Fluellen?

27

III,6,1572

We would have all such offenders so cut off: and we
give express charge, that in our marches through the...

28

III,6,1581

Well then I know thee: what shall I know of thee?

29

III,6,1583

Unfold it.

30

III,6,1604

What is thy name? I know thy quality.

31

III,6,1606

Thou dost thy office fairly. Turn thee back.
And tell thy king I do not seek him now;...

32

III,6,1637

We are in God's hand, brother, not in theirs.
March to the bridge; it now draws toward night:...

33

IV,1,1843

Gloucester, 'tis true that we are in great danger;
The greater therefore should our courage be....

34

IV,1,1861

'Tis good for men to love their present pains
Upon example; so the spirit is eased:...

35

IV,1,1873

No, my good knight;
Go with my brothers to my lords of England:...

36

IV,1,1879

God-a-mercy, old heart! thou speak'st cheerfully.

37

IV,1,1882

A friend.

38

IV,1,1885

I am a gentleman of a company.

39

IV,1,1887

Even so. What are you?

40

IV,1,1889

Then you are a better than the king.

41

IV,1,1895

Harry le Roy.

42

IV,1,1897

No, I am a Welshman.

43

IV,1,1899

Yes.

44

IV,1,1902

Do not you wear your dagger in your cap that day,
lest he knock that about yours.

45

IV,1,1905

And his kinsman too.

46

IV,1,1907

I thank you: God be with you!

47

IV,1,1910

It sorts well with your fierceness.

48

IV,1,1931

Though it appear a little out of fashion,
There is much care and valour in this Welshman.

49

IV,1,1940

A friend.

50

IV,1,1942

Under Sir Thomas Erpingham.

51

IV,1,1945

Even as men wrecked upon a sand, that look to be
washed off the next tide.

52

IV,1,1948

No; nor it is not meet he should. For, though I
speak it to you, I think the king is but a man, as I...

53

IV,1,1965

By my troth, I will speak my conscience of the king:
I think he would not wish himself any where but...

54

IV,1,1970

I dare say you love him not so ill, to wish him here
alone, howsoever you speak this to feel other men's...

55

IV,1,1994

So, if a son that is by his father sent about
merchandise do sinfully miscarry upon the sea, the...

56

IV,1,2039

I myself heard the king say he would not be ransomed.

57

IV,1,2043

If I live to see it, I will never trust his word after.

58

IV,1,2050

Your reproof is something too round: I should be
angry with you, if the time were convenient.

59

IV,1,2053

I embrace it.

60

IV,1,2055

Give me any gage of thine, and I will wear it in my
bonnet: then, if ever thou darest acknowledge it, I...

61

IV,1,2059

There.

62

IV,1,2063

If ever I live to see it, I will challenge it.

63

IV,1,2065

Well. I will do it, though I take thee in the
king's company.

64

IV,1,2070

Indeed, the French may lay twenty French crowns to
one, they will beat us; for they bear them on their...

65

IV,1,2134

Good old knight,
Collect them all together at my tent:...

66

IV,1,2139

O God of battles! steel my soldiers' hearts;
Possess them not with fear; take from them now...

67

IV,1,2158

My brother Gloucester's voice? Ay;
I know thy errand, I will go with thee:...

68

IV,3,2253

What's he that wishes so?
My cousin Westmoreland? No, my fair cousin:...

69

IV,3,2307

All things are ready, if our minds be so.

70

IV,3,2309

Thou dost not wish more help from England, coz?

71

IV,3,2312

Why, now thou hast unwish'd five thousand men;
Which likes me better than to wish us one....

72

IV,3,2326

Who hath sent thee now?

73

IV,3,2328

I pray thee, bear my former answer back:
Bid them achieve me and then sell my bones....

74

IV,3,2367

I fear thou'lt once more come again for ransom.

75

IV,3,2371

Take it, brave York. Now, soldiers, march away:
And how thou pleasest, God, dispose the day!

76

IV,6,2477

Well have we done, thrice valiant countrymen:
But all's not done; yet keep the French the field.

77

IV,6,2480

Lives he, good uncle? thrice within this hour
I saw him down; thrice up again and fighting;...

78

IV,6,2509

I blame you not;
For, hearing this, I must perforce compound...

79

IV,7,2573

I was not angry since I came to France
Until this instant. Take a trumpet, herald;...

80

IV,7,2587

How now! what means this, herald? know'st thou not
That I have fined these bones of mine for ransom?...

81

IV,7,2604

I tell thee truly, herald,
I know not if the day be ours or no;...

82

IV,7,2609

Praised be God, and not our strength, for it!
What is this castle call'd that stands hard by?

83

IV,7,2612

Then call we this the field of Agincourt,
Fought on the day of Crispin Crispianus.

84

IV,7,2618

They did, Fluellen.

85

IV,7,2626

I wear it for a memorable honour;
For I am Welsh, you know, good countryman.

86

IV,7,2632

Thanks, good my countryman.

87

IV,7,2637

God keep me so! Our heralds go with him:
Bring me just notice of the numbers dead...

88

IV,7,2642

Soldier, why wearest thou that glove in thy cap?

89

IV,7,2645

An Englishman?

90

IV,7,2652

What think you, Captain Fluellen? is it fit this
soldier keep his oath?

91

IV,7,2656

It may be his enemy is a gentleman of great sort,
quite from the answer of his degree.

92

IV,7,2665

Then keep thy vow, sirrah, when thou meetest the fellow.

93

IV,7,2667

Who servest thou under?

94

IV,7,2671

Call him hither to me, soldier.

95

IV,7,2674

Here, Fluellen; wear thou this favour for me and
stick it in thy cap: when Alencon and myself were...

96

IV,7,2686

Knowest thou Gower?

97

IV,7,2688

Pray thee, go seek him, and bring him to my tent.

98

IV,7,2691

My Lord of Warwick, and my brother Gloucester,
Follow Fluellen closely at the heels:...

99

IV,8,2733

How now! what's the matter?

100

IV,8,2748

Give me thy glove, soldier: look, here is the
fellow of it....

101

IV,8,2754

How canst thou make me satisfaction?

102

IV,8,2757

It was ourself thou didst abuse.

103

IV,8,2765

Here, uncle Exeter, fill this glove with crowns,
And give it to this fellow. Keep it, fellow;...

104

IV,8,2781

Now, herald, are the dead number'd?

105

IV,8,2783

What prisoners of good sort are taken, uncle?

106

IV,8,2788

This note doth tell me of ten thousand French
That in the field lie slain: of princes, in this number,...

107

IV,8,2823

Come, go we in procession to the village.
And be it death proclaimed through our host...

108

IV,8,2829

Yes, captain; but with this acknowledgement,
That God fought for us.

109

IV,8,2832

Do we all holy rites;
Let there be sung 'Non nobis' and 'Te Deum;'...

110

V,2,2982

Peace to this meeting, wherefore we are met!
Unto our brother France, and to our sister,...

111

V,2,3002

To cry amen to that, thus we appear.

112

V,2,3049

If, Duke of Burgundy, you would the peace,
Whose want gives growth to the imperfections...

113

V,2,3057

Well then the peace,
Which you before so urged, lies in his answer.

114

V,2,3065

Brother, we shall. Go, uncle Exeter,
And brother Clarence, and you, brother Gloucester,...

115

V,2,3077

Yet leave our cousin Katharine here with us:
She is our capital demand, comprised...

116

V,2,3082

Fair Katharine, and most fair,
Will you vouchsafe to teach a soldier terms...

117

V,2,3087

O fair Katharine, if you will love me soundly with
your French heart, I will be glad to hear you...

118

V,2,3092

An angel is like you, Kate, and you are like an angel.

119

V,2,3095

I said so, dear Katharine; and I must not blush to
affirm it.

120

V,2,3099

What says she, fair one? that the tongues of men
are full of deceits?

121

V,2,3103

The princess is the better Englishwoman. I' faith,
Kate, my wooing is fit for thy understanding: I am...

122

V,2,3114

Marry, if you would put me to verses or to dance for
your sake, Kate, why you undid me: for the one, I...

123

V,2,3154

No; it is not possible you should love the enemy of
France, Kate: but, in loving me, you should love...

124

V,2,3161

No, Kate? I will tell thee in French; which I am
sure will hang upon my tongue like a new-married...

125

V,2,3173

No, faith, is't not, Kate: but thy speaking of my
tongue, and I thine, most truly-falsely, must needs...

126

V,2,3178

Can any of your neighbours tell, Kate? I'll ask
them. Come, I know thou lovest me: and at night,...

127

V,2,3195

No; 'tis hereafter to know, but now to promise: do
but now promise, Kate, you will endeavour for your...

128

V,2,3203

Now, fie upon my false French! By mine honour, in
true English, I love thee, Kate: by which honour I...

129

V,2,3232

Nay, it will please him well, Kate it shall please
him, Kate.

130

V,2,3235

Upon that I kiss your hand, and I call you my queen.

131

V,2,3241

Then I will kiss your lips, Kate.

132

V,2,3244

Madam my interpreter, what says she?

133

V,2,3247

To kiss.

134

V,2,3249

It is not a fashion for the maids in France to kiss
before they are married, would she say?

135

V,2,3252

O Kate, nice customs curtsy to great kings. Dear
Kate, you and I cannot be confined within the weak...

136

V,2,3269

I would have her learn, my fair cousin, how
perfectly I love her; and that is good English.

137

V,2,3272

Our tongue is rough, coz, and my condition is not
smooth; so that, having neither the voice nor the...

138

V,2,3286

Yet they do wink and yield, as love is blind and enforces.

139

V,2,3289

Then, good my lord, teach your cousin to consent winking.

140

V,2,3296

This moral ties me over to time and a hot summer;
and so I shall catch the fly, your cousin, in the...

141

V,2,3300

It is so: and you may, some of you, thank love for
my blindness, who cannot see many a fair French city...

142

V,2,3306

Shall Kate be my wife?

143

V,2,3308

I am content; so the maiden cities you talk of may
wait on her: so the maid that stood in the way for...

144

V,2,3312

Is't so, my lords of England?

145

V,2,3326

I pray you then, in love and dear alliance,
Let that one article rank with the rest;...

146

V,2,3338

Now, welcome, Kate: and bear me witness all,
That here I kiss her as my sovereign queen.

147

V,2,3352

Prepare we for our marriage—on which day,
My Lord of Burgundy, we'll take your oath,...

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