Speeches (Lines) for Henry V
in "Henry IV, Part I"

Total: 170

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# Act, Scene, Line
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Speech text

1

I,2,113

Falstaff. Now, Hal, what time of day is it, lad?

Henry V. Thou art so fat-witted, with drinking of old sack
and unbuttoning thee after supper and sleeping upon
benches after noon, that thou hast forgotten to
demand that truly which thou wouldst truly know.
What a devil hast thou to do with the time of the
day? Unless hours were cups of sack and minutes
capons and clocks the tongues of bawds and dials the
signs of leaping-houses and the blessed sun himself
a fair hot wench in flame-coloured taffeta, I see no
reason why thou shouldst be so superfluous to demand
the time of the day.


2

I,2,130

Falstaff. Indeed, you come near me now, Hal; for we that take
purses go by the moon and the seven stars, and not
by Phoebus, he,'that wandering knight so fair.' And,
I prithee, sweet wag, when thou art king, as, God
save thy grace,—majesty I should say, for grace
thou wilt have none,—

Henry V. What, none?


3

I,2,133

Falstaff. No, by my troth, not so much as will serve to
prologue to an egg and butter.

Henry V. Well, how then? come, roundly, roundly.


4

I,2,141

Falstaff. Marry, then, sweet wag, when thou art king, let not
us that are squires of the night's body be called
thieves of the day's beauty: let us be Diana's
foresters, gentlemen of the shade, minions of the
moon; and let men say we be men of good government,
being governed, as the sea is, by our noble and
chaste mistress the moon, under whose countenance we steal.

Henry V. Thou sayest well, and it holds well too; for the
fortune of us that are the moon's men doth ebb and
flow like the sea, being governed, as the sea is,
by the moon. As, for proof, now: a purse of gold
most resolutely snatched on Monday night and most
dissolutely spent on Tuesday morning; got with
swearing 'Lay by' and spent with crying 'Bring in;'
now in as low an ebb as the foot of the ladder
and by and by in as high a flow as the ridge of the gallows.


5

I,2,152

Falstaff. By the Lord, thou sayest true, lad. And is not my
hostess of the tavern a most sweet wench?

Henry V. As the honey of Hybla, my old lad of the castle. And
is not a buff jerkin a most sweet robe of durance?


6

I,2,157

Falstaff. How now, how now, mad wag! what, in thy quips and
thy quiddities? what a plague have I to do with a
buff jerkin?

Henry V. Why, what a pox have I to do with my hostess of the tavern?


7

I,2,160

Falstaff. Well, thou hast called her to a reckoning many a
time and oft.

Henry V. Did I ever call for thee to pay thy part?


8

I,2,162

Falstaff. No; I'll give thee thy due, thou hast paid all there.

Henry V. Yea, and elsewhere, so far as my coin would stretch;
and where it would not, I have used my credit.


9

I,2,170

Falstaff. Yea, and so used it that were it not here apparent
that thou art heir apparent—But, I prithee, sweet
wag, shall there be gallows standing in England when
thou art king? and resolution thus fobbed as it is
with the rusty curb of old father antic the law? Do
not thou, when thou art king, hang a thief.

Henry V. No; thou shalt.


10

I,2,172

Falstaff. Shall I? O rare! By the Lord, I'll be a brave judge.

Henry V. Thou judgest false already: I mean, thou shalt have
the hanging of the thieves and so become a rare hangman.


11

I,2,177

Falstaff. Well, Hal, well; and in some sort it jumps with my
humour as well as waiting in the court, I can tell
you.

Henry V. For obtaining of suits?


12

I,2,181

Falstaff. Yea, for obtaining of suits, whereof the hangman
hath no lean wardrobe. 'Sblood, I am as melancholy
as a gib cat or a lugged bear.

Henry V. Or an old lion, or a lover's lute.


13

I,2,183

Falstaff. Yea, or the drone of a Lincolnshire bagpipe.

Henry V. What sayest thou to a hare, or the melancholy of
Moor-ditch?


14

I,2,194

Falstaff. Thou hast the most unsavoury similes and art indeed
the most comparative, rascalliest, sweet young
prince. But, Hal, I prithee, trouble me no more
with vanity. I would to God thou and I knew where a
commodity of good names were to be bought. An old
lord of the council rated me the other day in the
street about you, sir, but I marked him not; and yet
he talked very wisely, but I regarded him not; and
yet he talked wisely, and in the street too.

Henry V. Thou didst well; for wisdom cries out in the
streets, and no man regards it.


15

I,2,205

Falstaff. O, thou hast damnable iteration and art indeed able
to corrupt a saint. Thou hast done much harm upon
me, Hal; God forgive thee for it! Before I knew
thee, Hal, I knew nothing; and now am I, if a man
should speak truly, little better than one of the
wicked. I must give over this life, and I will give
it over: by the Lord, and I do not, I am a villain:
I'll be damned for never a king's son in
Christendom.

Henry V. Where shall we take a purse tomorrow, Jack?


16

I,2,208

Falstaff. 'Zounds, where thou wilt, lad; I'll make one; an I
do not, call me villain and baffle me.

Henry V. I see a good amendment of life in thee; from praying
to purse-taking.


17

I,2,218

Falstaff. Why, Hal, 'tis my vocation, Hal; 'tis no sin for a
man to labour in his vocation.
[Enter POINS]
Poins! Now shall we know if Gadshill have set a
match. O, if men were to be saved by merit, what
hole in hell were hot enough for him? This is the
most omnipotent villain that ever cried 'Stand' to
a true man.

Henry V. Good morrow, Ned.


18

I,2,224

Edward Poins. Good morrow, sweet Hal. What says Monsieur Remorse?
what says Sir John Sack and Sugar? Jack! how
agrees the devil and thee about thy soul, that thou
soldest him on Good-Friday last for a cup of Madeira
and a cold capon's leg?

Henry V. Sir John stands to his word, the devil shall have
his bargain; for he was never yet a breaker of
proverbs: he will give the devil his due.


19

I,2,228

Edward Poins. Then art thou damned for keeping thy word with the devil.

Henry V. Else he had been damned for cozening the devil.


20

I,2,243

Falstaff. Hal, wilt thou make one?

Henry V. Who, I rob? I a thief? not I, by my faith.


21

I,2,247

Falstaff. There's neither honesty, manhood, nor good
fellowship in thee, nor thou camest not of the blood
royal, if thou darest not stand for ten shillings.

Henry V. Well then, once in my days I'll be a madcap.


22

I,2,249

Falstaff. Why, that's well said.

Henry V. Well, come what will, I'll tarry at home.


23

I,2,251

Falstaff. By the Lord, I'll be a traitor then, when thou art king.

Henry V. I care not.


24

I,2,261

Falstaff. Well, God give thee the spirit of persuasion and him
the ears of profiting, that what thou speakest may
move and what he hears may be believed, that the
true prince may, for recreation sake, prove a false
thief; for the poor abuses of the time want
countenance. Farewell: you shall find me in Eastcheap.

Henry V. Farewell, thou latter spring! farewell, All-hallown summer!


25

I,2,270

Edward Poins. Now, my good sweet honey lord, ride with us
to-morrow: I have a jest to execute that I cannot
manage alone. Falstaff, Bardolph, Peto and Gadshill
shall rob those men that we have already waylaid:
yourself and I will not be there; and when they
have the booty, if you and I do not rob them, cut
this head off from my shoulders.

Henry V. How shall we part with them in setting forth?


26

I,2,276

Edward Poins. Why, we will set forth before or after them, and
appoint them a place of meeting, wherein it is at
our pleasure to fail, and then will they adventure
upon the exploit themselves; which they shall have
no sooner achieved, but we'll set upon them.

Henry V. Yea, but 'tis like that they will know us by our
horses, by our habits and by every other
appointment, to be ourselves.


27

I,2,283

Edward Poins. Tut! our horses they shall not see: I'll tie them
in the wood; our vizards we will change after we
leave them: and, sirrah, I have cases of buckram
for the nonce, to immask our noted outward garments.

Henry V. Yea, but I doubt they will be too hard for us.


28

I,2,293

Edward Poins. Well, for two of them, I know them to be as
true-bred cowards as ever turned back; and for the
third, if he fight longer than he sees reason, I'll
forswear arms. The virtue of this jest will be, the
incomprehensible lies that this same fat rogue will
tell us when we meet at supper: how thirty, at
least, he fought with; what wards, what blows, what
extremities he endured; and in the reproof of this
lies the jest.

Henry V. Well, I'll go with thee: provide us all things
necessary and meet me to-morrow night in Eastcheap;
there I'll sup. Farewell.


29

I,2,298

(stage directions). [Exit Poins]

Henry V. I know you all, and will awhile uphold
The unyoked humour of your idleness:
Yet herein will I imitate the sun,
Who doth permit the base contagious clouds
To smother up his beauty from the world,
That, when he please again to be himself,
Being wanted, he may be more wonder'd at,
By breaking through the foul and ugly mists
Of vapours that did seem to strangle him.
If all the year were playing holidays,
To sport would be as tedious as to work;
But when they seldom come, they wish'd for come,
And nothing pleaseth but rare accidents.
So, when this loose behavior I throw off
And pay the debt I never promised,
By how much better than my word I am,
By so much shall I falsify men's hopes;
And like bright metal on a sullen ground,
My reformation, glittering o'er my fault,
Shall show more goodly and attract more eyes
Than that which hath no foil to set it off.
I'll so offend, to make offence a skill;
Redeeming time when men think least I will.


30

II,2,743

Edward Poins. Come, shelter, shelter: I have removed Falstaff's
horse, and he frets like a gummed velvet.

Henry V. Stand close.


31

II,2,746

Falstaff. Poins! Poins, and be hanged! Poins!

Henry V. Peace, ye fat-kidneyed rascal! what a brawling dost
thou keep!


32

II,2,749

Falstaff. Where's Poins, Hal?

Henry V. He is walked up to the top of the hill: I'll go seek him.


33

II,2,772

Falstaff. I am accursed to rob in that thief's company: the
rascal hath removed my horse, and tied him I know
not where. If I travel but four foot by the squier
further afoot, I shall break my wind. Well, I doubt
not but to die a fair death for all this, if I
'scape hanging for killing that rogue. I have
forsworn his company hourly any time this two and
twenty years, and yet I am bewitched with the
rogue's company. If the rascal hath not given me
medicines to make me love him, I'll be hanged; it
could not be else: I have drunk medicines. Poins!
Hal! a plague upon you both! Bardolph! Peto!
I'll starve ere I'll rob a foot further. An 'twere
not as good a deed as drink, to turn true man and to
leave these rogues, I am the veriest varlet that
ever chewed with a tooth. Eight yards of uneven
ground is threescore and ten miles afoot with me;
and the stony-hearted villains know it well enough:
a plague upon it when thieves cannot be true one to another!
[They whistle]
Whew! A plague upon you all! Give me my horse, you
rogues; give me my horse, and be hanged!

Henry V. Peace, ye fat-guts! lie down; lay thine ear close
to the ground and list if thou canst hear the tread
of travellers.


34

II,2,779

Falstaff. Have you any levers to lift me up again, being down?
'Sblood, I'll not bear mine own flesh so far afoot
again for all the coin in thy father's exchequer.
What a plague mean ye to colt me thus?

Henry V. Thou liest; thou art not colted, thou art uncolted.


35

II,2,782

Falstaff. I prithee, good Prince Hal, help me to my horse,
good king's son.

Henry V. Out, ye rogue! shall I be your ostler?


36

II,2,799

Falstaff. To be hanged.

Henry V. Sirs, you four shall front them in the narrow lane;
Ned Poins and I will walk lower: if they 'scape
from your encounter, then they light on us.


37

II,2,805

Falstaff. 'Zounds, will they not rob us?

Henry V. What, a coward, Sir John Paunch?


38

II,2,808

Falstaff. Indeed, I am not John of Gaunt, your grandfather;
but yet no coward, Hal.

Henry V. Well, we leave that to the proof.


39

II,2,813

Falstaff. Now cannot I strike him, if I should be hanged.

Henry V. Ned, where are our disguises?


40

II,2,833

(stage directions). [Re-enter PRINCE HENRY and POINS]

Henry V. The thieves have bound the true men. Now could thou
and I rob the thieves and go merrily to London, it
would be argument for a week, laughter for a month
and a good jest for ever.


41

II,2,843

Falstaff. Come, my masters, let us share, and then to horse
before day. An the Prince and Poins be not two
arrant cowards, there's no equity stirring: there's
no more valour in that Poins than in a wild-duck.

Henry V. Your money!


42

II,2,848

Edward Poins. Villains!
[As they are sharing, the Prince and Poins set upon
them; they all run away; and Falstaff, after a blow
or two, runs away too, leaving the booty behind them]

Henry V. Got with much ease. Now merrily to horse:
The thieves are all scatter'd and possess'd with fear
So strongly that they dare not meet each other;
Each takes his fellow for an officer.
Away, good Ned. Falstaff sweats to death,
And lards the lean earth as he walks along:
Were 't not for laughing, I should pity him.


43

II,4,985

(stage directions). [Enter PRINCE HENRY and POINS]

Henry V. Ned, prithee, come out of that fat room, and lend me
thy hand to laugh a little.


44

II,4,988

Edward Poins. Where hast been, Hal?

Henry V. With three or four loggerheads amongst three or four
score hogsheads. I have sounded the very
base-string of humility. Sirrah, I am sworn brother
to a leash of drawers; and can call them all by
their christen names, as Tom, Dick, and Francis.
They take it already upon their salvation, that
though I be but the prince of Wales, yet I am king
of courtesy; and tell me flatly I am no proud Jack,
like Falstaff, but a Corinthian, a lad of mettle, a
good boy, by the Lord, so they call me, and when I
am king of England, I shall command all the good
lads in Eastcheap. They call drinking deep, dyeing
scarlet; and when you breathe in your watering, they
cry 'hem!' and bid you play it off. To conclude, I
am so good a proficient in one quarter of an hour,
that I can drink with any tinker in his own language
during my life. I tell thee, Ned, thou hast lost
much honour, that thou wert not with me in this sweet
action. But, sweet Ned,—to sweeten which name of
Ned, I give thee this pennyworth of sugar, clapped
even now into my hand by an under-skinker, one that
never spake other English in his life than 'Eight
shillings and sixpence' and 'You are welcome,' with
this shrill addition, 'Anon, anon, sir! Score a pint
of bastard in the Half-Moon,' or so. But, Ned, to
drive away the time till Falstaff come, I prithee,
do thou stand in some by-room, while I question my
puny drawer to what end he gave me the sugar; and do
thou never leave calling 'Francis,' that his tale
to me may be nothing but 'Anon.' Step aside, and
I'll show thee a precedent.


45

II,4,1020

Edward Poins. Francis!

Henry V. Thou art perfect.


46

II,4,1025

Francis. Anon, anon, sir. Look down into the Pomgarnet, Ralph.

Henry V. Come hither, Francis.


47

II,4,1027

Francis. My lord?

Henry V. How long hast thou to serve, Francis?


48

II,4,1031

Francis. Anon, anon, sir.

Henry V. Five year! by'r lady, a long lease for the clinking
of pewter. But, Francis, darest thou be so valiant
as to play the coward with thy indenture and show it
a fair pair of heels and run from it?


49

II,4,1039

Francis. Anon, sir.

Henry V. How old art thou, Francis?


50

II,4,1043

Francis. Anon, sir. Pray stay a little, my lord.

Henry V. Nay, but hark you, Francis: for the sugar thou
gavest me,'twas a pennyworth, wast't not?


51

II,4,1046

Francis. O Lord, I would it had been two!

Henry V. I will give thee for it a thousand pound: ask me
when thou wilt, and thou shalt have it.


52

II,4,1050

Francis. Anon, anon.

Henry V. Anon, Francis? No, Francis; but to-morrow, Francis;
or, Francis, o' Thursday; or indeed, Francis, when
thou wilt. But, Francis!


53

II,4,1054

Francis. My lord?

Henry V. Wilt thou rob this leathern jerkin, crystal-button,
not-pated, agate-ring, puke-stocking, caddis-garter,
smooth-tongue, Spanish-pouch,—


54

II,4,1058

Francis. O Lord, sir, who do you mean?

Henry V. Why, then, your brown bastard is your only drink;
for look you, Francis, your white canvas doublet
will sully: in Barbary, sir, it cannot come to so much.


55

II,4,1063

Edward Poins. [Within] Francis!

Henry V. Away, you rogue! dost thou not hear them call?
[Here they both call him; the drawer stands amazed,
not knowing which way to go]


56

II,4,1072

Vintner. What, standest thou still, and hearest such a
calling? Look to the guests within.
[Exit Francis]
My lord, old Sir John, with half-a-dozen more, are
at the door: shall I let them in?

Henry V. Let them alone awhile, and then open the door.
[Exit Vintner]
Poins!


57

II,4,1077

Edward Poins. Anon, anon, sir.

Henry V. Sirrah, Falstaff and the rest of the thieves are at
the door: shall we be merry?


58

II,4,1082

Edward Poins. As merry as crickets, my lad. But hark ye; what
cunning match have you made with this jest of the
drawer? come, what's the issue?

Henry V. I am now of all humours that have showed themselves
humours since the old days of goodman Adam to the
pupil age of this present twelve o'clock at midnight.
[Re-enter FRANCIS]
What's o'clock, Francis?


59

II,4,1089

(stage directions). [Exit]

Henry V. That ever this fellow should have fewer words than a
parrot, and yet the son of a woman! His industry is
upstairs and downstairs; his eloquence the parcel of
a reckoning. I am not yet of Percy's mind, the
Hotspur of the north; he that kills me some six or
seven dozen of Scots at a breakfast, washes his
hands, and says to his wife 'Fie upon this quiet
life! I want work.' 'O my sweet Harry,' says she,
'how many hast thou killed to-day?' 'Give my roan
horse a drench,' says he; and answers 'Some
fourteen,' an hour after; 'a trifle, a trifle.' I
prithee, call in Falstaff: I'll play Percy, and
that damned brawn shall play Dame Mortimer his
wife. 'Rivo!' says the drunkard. Call in ribs, call in tallow.


60

II,4,1111

(stage directions). [He drinks]

Henry V. Didst thou never see Titan kiss a dish of butter?
pitiful-hearted Titan, that melted at the sweet tale
of the sun's! if thou didst, then behold that compound.


61

II,4,1125

Falstaff. You rogue, here's lime in this sack too: there is
nothing but roguery to be found in villanous man:
yet a coward is worse than a cup of sack with lime
in it. A villanous coward! Go thy ways, old Jack;
die when thou wilt, if manhood, good manhood, be
not forgot upon the face of the earth, then am I a
shotten herring. There live not three good men
unhanged in England; and one of them is fat and
grows old: God help the while! a bad world, I say.
I would I were a weaver; I could sing psalms or any
thing. A plague of all cowards, I say still.

Henry V. How now, wool-sack! what mutter you?


62

II,4,1130

Falstaff. A king's son! If I do not beat thee out of thy
kingdom with a dagger of lath, and drive all thy
subjects afore thee like a flock of wild-geese,
I'll never wear hair on my face more. You Prince of Wales!

Henry V. Why, you whoreson round man, what's the matter?


63

II,4,1142

Falstaff. I call thee coward! I'll see thee damned ere I call
thee coward: but I would give a thousand pound I
could run as fast as thou canst. You are straight
enough in the shoulders, you care not who sees your
back: call you that backing of your friends? A
plague upon such backing! give me them that will
face me. Give me a cup of sack: I am a rogue, if I
drunk to-day.

Henry V. O villain! thy lips are scarce wiped since thou
drunkest last.


64

II,4,1147

Falstaff. All's one for that.
[He drinks]
A plague of all cowards, still say I.

Henry V. What's the matter?


65

II,4,1150

Falstaff. What's the matter! there be four of us here have
ta'en a thousand pound this day morning.

Henry V. Where is it, Jack? where is it?


66

II,4,1153

Falstaff. Where is it! taken from us it is: a hundred upon
poor four of us.

Henry V. What, a hundred, man?


67

II,4,1163

Falstaff. I am a rogue, if I were not at half-sword with a
dozen of them two hours together. I have 'scaped by
miracle. I am eight times thrust through the
doublet, four through the hose; my buckler cut
through and through; my sword hacked like a
hand-saw—ecce signum! I never dealt better since
I was a man: all would not do. A plague of all
cowards! Let them speak: if they speak more or
less than truth, they are villains and the sons of darkness.

Henry V. Speak, sirs; how was it?


68

II,4,1172

Falstaff. And unbound the rest, and then come in the other.

Henry V. What, fought you with them all?


69

II,4,1177

Falstaff. All! I know not what you call all; but if I fought
not with fifty of them, I am a bunch of radish: if
there were not two or three and fifty upon poor old
Jack, then am I no two-legged creature.

Henry V. Pray God you have not murdered some of them.


70

II,4,1184

Falstaff. Nay, that's past praying for: I have peppered two
of them; two I am sure I have paid, two rogues
in buckram suits. I tell thee what, Hal, if I tell
thee a lie, spit in my face, call me horse. Thou
knowest my old ward; here I lay and thus I bore my
point. Four rogues in buckram let drive at me—

Henry V. What, four? thou saidst but two even now.


71

II,4,1190

Falstaff. These four came all a-front, and mainly thrust at
me. I made me no more ado but took all their seven
points in my target, thus.

Henry V. Seven? why, there were but four even now.


72

II,4,1194

Falstaff. Seven, by these hilts, or I am a villain else.

Henry V. Prithee, let him alone; we shall have more anon.


73

II,4,1196

Falstaff. Dost thou hear me, Hal?

Henry V. Ay, and mark thee too, Jack.


74

II,4,1199

Falstaff. Do so, for it is worth the listening to. These nine
in buckram that I told thee of—

Henry V. So, two more already.


75

II,4,1205

Falstaff. Began to give me ground: but I followed me close,
came in foot and hand; and with a thought seven of
the eleven I paid.

Henry V. O monstrous! eleven buckram men grown out of two!


76

II,4,1210

Falstaff. But, as the devil would have it, three misbegotten
knaves in Kendal green came at my back and let drive
at me; for it was so dark, Hal, that thou couldst
not see thy hand.

Henry V. These lies are like their father that begets them;
gross as a mountain, open, palpable. Why, thou
clay-brained guts, thou knotty-pated fool, thou
whoreson, obscene, grease tallow-catch,—


77

II,4,1216

Falstaff. What, art thou mad? art thou mad? is not the truth
the truth?

Henry V. Why, how couldst thou know these men in Kendal
green, when it was so dark thou couldst not see thy
hand? come, tell us your reason: what sayest thou to this?


78

II,4,1226

Falstaff. What, upon compulsion? 'Zounds, an I were at the
strappado, or all the racks in the world, I would
not tell you on compulsion. Give you a reason on
compulsion! If reasons were as plentiful as
blackberries, I would give no man a reason upon
compulsion, I.

Henry V. I'll be no longer guilty of this sin; this sanguine
coward, this bed-presser, this horseback-breaker,
this huge hill of flesh,—


79

II,4,1234

Falstaff. 'Sblood, you starveling, you elf-skin, you dried
neat's tongue, you bull's pizzle, you stock-fish! O
for breath to utter what is like thee! you
tailor's-yard, you sheath, you bowcase; you vile
standing-tuck,—

Henry V. Well, breathe awhile, and then to it again: and
when thou hast tired thyself in base comparisons,
hear me speak but this.


80

II,4,1238

Edward Poins. Mark, Jack.

Henry V. We two saw you four set on four and bound them, and
were masters of their wealth. Mark now, how a plain
tale shall put you down. Then did we two set on you
four; and, with a word, out-faced you from your
prize, and have it; yea, and can show it you here in
the house: and, Falstaff, you carried your guts
away as nimbly, with as quick dexterity, and roared
for mercy and still run and roared, as ever I heard
bull-calf. What a slave art thou, to hack thy sword
as thou hast done, and then say it was in fight!
What trick, what device, what starting-hole, canst
thou now find out to hide thee from this open and
apparent shame?


81

II,4,1266

Falstaff. By the Lord, I knew ye as well as he that made ye.
Why, hear you, my masters: was it for me to kill the
heir-apparent? should I turn upon the true prince?
why, thou knowest I am as valiant as Hercules: but
beware instinct; the lion will not touch the true
prince. Instinct is a great matter; I was now a
coward on instinct. I shall think the better of
myself and thee during my life; I for a valiant
lion, and thou for a true prince. But, by the Lord,
lads, I am glad you have the money. Hostess, clap
to the doors: watch to-night, pray to-morrow.
Gallants, lads, boys, hearts of gold, all the titles
of good fellowship come to you! What, shall we be
merry? shall we have a play extempore?

Henry V. Content; and the argument shall be thy running away.


82

II,4,1270

Hostess Quickly. O Jesu, my lord the prince!

Henry V. How now, my lady the hostess! what sayest thou to
me?


83

II,4,1275

Hostess Quickly. Marry, my lord, there is a nobleman of the court at
door would speak with you: he says he comes from
your father.

Henry V. Give him as much as will make him a royal man, and
send him back again to my mother.


84

II,4,1281

Falstaff. What doth gravity out of his bed at midnight? Shall
I give him his answer?

Henry V. Prithee, do, Jack.


85

II,4,1284

(stage directions). [Exit FALSTAFF]

Henry V. Now, sirs: by'r lady, you fought fair; so did you,
Peto; so did you, Bardolph: you are lions too, you
ran away upon instinct, you will not touch the true
prince; no, fie!


86

II,4,1289

Lord Bardolph. 'Faith, I ran when I saw others run.

Henry V. 'Faith, tell me now in earnest, how came Falstaff's
sword so hacked?


87

II,4,1299

Lord Bardolph. Yea, and to tickle our noses with spear-grass to
make them bleed, and then to beslubber our garments
with it and swear it was the blood of true men. I
did that I did not this seven year before, I blushed
to hear his monstrous devices.

Henry V. O villain, thou stolest a cup of sack eighteen years
ago, and wert taken with the manner, and ever since
thou hast blushed extempore. Thou hadst fire and
sword on thy side, and yet thou rannest away: what
instinct hadst thou for it?


88

II,4,1306

Lord Bardolph. My lord, do you see these meteors? do you behold
these exhalations?

Henry V. I do.


89

II,4,1308

Lord Bardolph. What think you they portend?

Henry V. Hot livers and cold purses.


90

II,4,1310

Lord Bardolph. Choler, my lord, if rightly taken.

Henry V. No, if rightly taken, halter.
[Re-enter FALSTAFF]
Here comes lean Jack, here comes bare-bone.
How now, my sweet creature of bombast!
How long is't ago, Jack, since thou sawest thine own knee?


91

II,4,1331

Falstaff. Owen, Owen, the same; and his son-in-law Mortimer,
and old Northumberland, and that sprightly Scot of
Scots, Douglas, that runs o' horseback up a hill
perpendicular,—

Henry V. He that rides at high speed and with his pistol
kills a sparrow flying.


92

II,4,1334

Falstaff. You have hit it.

Henry V. So did he never the sparrow.


93

II,4,1336

Falstaff. Well, that rascal hath good mettle in him; he will not run.

Henry V. Why, what a rascal art thou then, to praise him so
for running!


94

II,4,1339

Falstaff. O' horseback, ye cuckoo; but afoot he will not budge a foot.

Henry V. Yes, Jack, upon instinct.


95

II,4,1345

Falstaff. I grant ye, upon instinct. Well, he is there too,
and one Mordake, and a thousand blue-caps more:
Worcester is stolen away to-night; thy father's
beard is turned white with the news: you may buy
land now as cheap as stinking mackerel.

Henry V. Why, then, it is like, if there come a hot June and
this civil buffeting hold, we shall buy maidenheads
as they buy hob-nails, by the hundreds.


96

II,4,1356

Falstaff. By the mass, lad, thou sayest true; it is like we
shall have good trading that way. But tell me, Hal,
art not thou horrible afeard? thou being
heir-apparent, could the world pick thee out three
such enemies again as that fiend Douglas, that
spirit Percy, and that devil Glendower? Art thou
not horribly afraid? doth not thy blood thrill at
it?

Henry V. Not a whit, i' faith; I lack some of thy instinct.


97

II,4,1359

Falstaff. Well, thou wert be horribly chid tomorrow when thou
comest to thy father: if thou love me, practise an answer.

Henry V. Do thou stand for my father, and examine me upon the
particulars of my life.


98

II,4,1363

Falstaff. Shall I? content: this chair shall be my state,
this dagger my sceptre, and this cushion my crown.

Henry V. Thy state is taken for a joined-stool, thy golden
sceptre for a leaden dagger, and thy precious rich
crown for a pitiful bald crown!


99

II,4,1371

Falstaff. Well, an the fire of grace be not quite out of thee,
now shalt thou be moved. Give me a cup of sack to
make my eyes look red, that it may be thought I have
wept; for I must speak in passion, and I will do it
in King Cambyses' vein.

Henry V. Well, here is my leg.


100

II,4,1403

Falstaff. Peace, good pint-pot; peace, good tickle-brain.
Harry, I do not only marvel where thou spendest thy
time, but also how thou art accompanied: for though
the camomile, the more it is trodden on the faster
it grows, yet youth, the more it is wasted the
sooner it wears. That thou art my son, I have
partly thy mother's word, partly my own opinion,
but chiefly a villanous trick of thine eye and a
foolish-hanging of thy nether lip, that doth warrant
me. If then thou be son to me, here lies the point;
why, being son to me, art thou so pointed at? Shall
the blessed sun of heaven prove a micher and eat
blackberries? a question not to be asked. Shall
the sun of England prove a thief and take purses? a
question to be asked. There is a thing, Harry,
which thou hast often heard of and it is known to
many in our land by the name of pitch: this pitch,
as ancient writers do report, doth defile; so doth
the company thou keepest: for, Harry, now I do not
speak to thee in drink but in tears, not in
pleasure but in passion, not in words only, but in
woes also: and yet there is a virtuous man whom I
have often noted in thy company, but I know not his name.

Henry V. What manner of man, an it like your majesty?


101

II,4,1416

Falstaff. A goodly portly man, i' faith, and a corpulent; of a
cheerful look, a pleasing eye and a most noble
carriage; and, as I think, his age some fifty, or,
by'r lady, inclining to three score; and now I
remember me, his name is Falstaff: if that man
should be lewdly given, he deceiveth me; for, Harry,
I see virtue in his looks. If then the tree may be
known by the fruit, as the fruit by the tree, then,
peremptorily I speak it, there is virtue in that
Falstaff: him keep with, the rest banish. And tell
me now, thou naughty varlet, tell me, where hast
thou been this month?

Henry V. Dost thou speak like a king? Do thou stand for me,
and I'll play my father.


102

II,4,1421

Falstaff. Depose me? if thou dost it half so gravely, so
majestically, both in word and matter, hang me up by
the heels for a rabbit-sucker or a poulter's hare.

Henry V. Well, here I am set.


103

II,4,1423

Falstaff. And here I stand: judge, my masters.

Henry V. Now, Harry, whence come you?


104

II,4,1425

Falstaff. My noble lord, from Eastcheap.

Henry V. The complaints I hear of thee are grievous.


105

II,4,1428

Falstaff. 'Sblood, my lord, they are false: nay, I'll tickle
ye for a young prince, i' faith.

Henry V. Swearest thou, ungracious boy? henceforth ne'er look
on me. Thou art violently carried away from grace:
there is a devil haunts thee in the likeness of an
old fat man; a tun of man is thy companion. Why
dost thou converse with that trunk of humours, that
bolting-hutch of beastliness, that swollen parcel
of dropsies, that huge bombard of sack, that stuffed
cloak-bag of guts, that roasted Manningtree ox with
the pudding in his belly, that reverend vice, that
grey iniquity, that father ruffian, that vanity in
years? Wherein is he good, but to taste sack and
drink it? wherein neat and cleanly, but to carve a
capon and eat it? wherein cunning, but in craft?
wherein crafty, but in villany? wherein villanous,
but in all things? wherein worthy, but in nothing?


106

II,4,1445

Falstaff. I would your grace would take me with you: whom
means your grace?

Henry V. That villanous abominable misleader of youth,
Falstaff, that old white-bearded Satan.


107

II,4,1448

Falstaff. My lord, the man I know.

Henry V. I know thou dost.


108

II,4,1464

Falstaff. But to say I know more harm in him than in myself,
were to say more than I know. That he is old, the
more the pity, his white hairs do witness it; but
that he is, saving your reverence, a whoremaster,
that I utterly deny. If sack and sugar be a fault,
God help the wicked! if to be old and merry be a
sin, then many an old host that I know is damned: if
to be fat be to be hated, then Pharaoh's lean kine
are to be loved. No, my good lord; banish Peto,
banish Bardolph, banish Poins: but for sweet Jack
Falstaff, kind Jack Falstaff, true Jack Falstaff,
valiant Jack Falstaff, and therefore more valiant,
being, as he is, old Jack Falstaff, banish not him
thy Harry's company, banish not him thy Harry's
company: banish plump Jack, and banish all the world.

Henry V. I do, I will.


109

II,4,1474

Hostess Quickly. O Jesu, my lord, my lord!

Henry V. Heigh, heigh! the devil rides upon a fiddlestick:
what's the matter?


110

II,4,1481

Falstaff. Dost thou hear, Hal? never call a true piece of
gold a counterfeit: thou art essentially mad,
without seeming so.

Henry V. And thou a natural coward, without instinct.


111

II,4,1486

Falstaff. I deny your major: if you will deny the sheriff,
so; if not, let him enter: if I become not a cart
as well as another man, a plague on my bringing up!
I hope I shall as soon be strangled with a halter as another.

Henry V. Go, hide thee behind the arras: the rest walk up
above. Now, my masters, for a true face and good
conscience.


112

II,4,1491

Falstaff. Both which I have had: but their date is out, and
therefore I'll hide me.

Henry V. Call in the sheriff.
[Exeunt all except PRINCE HENRY and PETO]
[Enter Sheriff and the Carrier]
Now, master sheriff, what is your will with me?


113

II,4,1497

Sheriff. First, pardon me, my lord. A hue and cry
Hath follow'd certain men unto this house.

Henry V. What men?


114

II,4,1501

Carrier. As fat as butter.

Henry V. The man, I do assure you, is not here;
For I myself at this time have employ'd him.
And, sheriff, I will engage my word to thee
That I will, by to-morrow dinner-time,
Send him to answer thee, or any man,
For any thing he shall be charged withal:
And so let me entreat you leave the house.


115

II,4,1510

Sheriff. I will, my lord. There are two gentlemen
Have in this robbery lost three hundred marks.

Henry V. It may be so: if he have robb'd these men,
He shall be answerable; and so farewell.


116

II,4,1513

Sheriff. Good night, my noble lord.

Henry V. I think it is good morrow, is it not?


117

II,4,1516

(stage directions). [Exeunt Sheriff and Carrier]

Henry V. This oily rascal is known as well as Paul's. Go,
call him forth.


118

II,4,1520

Peto. Falstaff!—Fast asleep behind the arras, and
snorting like a horse.

Henry V. Hark, how hard he fetches breath. Search his pockets.
[He searcheth his pockets, and findeth certain papers]
What hast thou found?


119

II,4,1524

Peto. Nothing but papers, my lord.

Henry V. Let's see what they be: read them.


120

II,4,1530

Peto. [Reads] Item, A capon,. . 2s. 2d.
Item, Sauce,. . . 4d.
Item, Sack, two gallons, 5s. 8d.
Item, Anchovies and sack after supper, 2s. 6d.
Item, Bread, ob.

Henry V. O monstrous! but one half-penny-worth of bread to
this intolerable deal of sack! What there is else,
keep close; we'll read it at more advantage: there
let him sleep till day. I'll to the court in the
morning. We must all to the wars, and thy place
shall be honourable. I'll procure this fat rogue a
charge of foot; and I know his death will be a
march of twelve-score. The money shall be paid
back again with advantage. Be with me betimes in
the morning; and so, good morrow, Peto.


121

III,2,1841

Henry IV. Lords, give us leave; the Prince of Wales and I
Must have some private conference; but be near at hand,
For we shall presently have need of you.
[Exeunt Lords]
I know not whether God will have it so,
For some displeasing service I have done,
That, in his secret doom, out of my blood
He'll breed revengement and a scourge for me;
But thou dost in thy passages of life
Make me believe that thou art only mark'd
For the hot vengeance and the rod of heaven
To punish my mistreadings. Tell me else,
Could such inordinate and low desires,
Such poor, such bare, such lewd, such mean attempts,
Such barren pleasures, rude society,
As thou art match'd withal and grafted to,
Accompany the greatness of thy blood
And hold their level with thy princely heart?

Henry V. So please your majesty, I would I could
Quit all offences with as clear excuse
As well as I am doubtless I can purge
Myself of many I am charged withal:
Yet such extenuation let me beg,
As, in reproof of many tales devised,
which oft the ear of greatness needs must hear,
By smiling pick-thanks and base news-mongers,
I may, for some things true, wherein my youth
Hath faulty wander'd and irregular,
Find pardon on my true submission.


122

III,2,1915

Henry IV. God pardon thee! yet let me wonder, Harry,
At thy affections, which do hold a wing
Quite from the flight of all thy ancestors.
Thy place in council thou hast rudely lost.
Which by thy younger brother is supplied,
And art almost an alien to the hearts
Of all the court and princes of my blood:
The hope and expectation of thy time
Is ruin'd, and the soul of every man
Prophetically doth forethink thy fall.
Had I so lavish of my presence been,
So common-hackney'd in the eyes of men,
So stale and cheap to vulgar company,
Opinion, that did help me to the crown,
Had still kept loyal to possession
And left me in reputeless banishment,
A fellow of no mark nor likelihood.
By being seldom seen, I could not stir
But like a comet I was wonder'd at;
That men would tell their children 'This is he;'
Others would say 'Where, which is Bolingbroke?'
And then I stole all courtesy from heaven,
And dress'd myself in such humility
That I did pluck allegiance from men's hearts,
Loud shouts and salutations from their mouths,
Even in the presence of the crowned king.
Thus did I keep my person fresh and new;
My presence, like a robe pontifical,
Ne'er seen but wonder'd at: and so my state,
Seldom but sumptuous, showed like a feast
And won by rareness such solemnity.
The skipping king, he ambled up and down
With shallow jesters and rash bavin wits,
Soon kindled and soon burnt; carded his state,
Mingled his royalty with capering fools,
Had his great name profaned with their scorns
And gave his countenance, against his name,
To laugh at gibing boys and stand the push
Of every beardless vain comparative,
Grew a companion to the common streets,
Enfeoff'd himself to popularity;
That, being daily swallow'd by men's eyes,
They surfeited with honey and began
To loathe the taste of sweetness, whereof a little
More than a little is by much too much.
So when he had occasion to be seen,
He was but as the cuckoo is in June,
Heard, not regarded; seen, but with such eyes
As, sick and blunted with community,
Afford no extraordinary gaze,
Such as is bent on sun-like majesty
When it shines seldom in admiring eyes;
But rather drowzed and hung their eyelids down,
Slept in his face and render'd such aspect
As cloudy men use to their adversaries,
Being with his presence glutted, gorged and full.
And in that very line, Harry, standest thou;
For thou has lost thy princely privilege
With vile participation: not an eye
But is a-weary of thy common sight,
Save mine, which hath desired to see thee more;
Which now doth that I would not have it do,
Make blind itself with foolish tenderness.

Henry V. I shall hereafter, my thrice gracious lord,
Be more myself.


123

III,2,1953

Henry IV. For all the world
As thou art to this hour was Richard then
When I from France set foot at Ravenspurgh,
And even as I was then is Percy now.
Now, by my sceptre and my soul to boot,
He hath more worthy interest to the state
Than thou the shadow of succession;
For of no right, nor colour like to right,
He doth fill fields with harness in the realm,
Turns head against the lion's armed jaws,
And, being no more in debt to years than thou,
Leads ancient lords and reverend bishops on
To bloody battles and to bruising arms.
What never-dying honour hath he got
Against renowned Douglas! whose high deeds,
Whose hot incursions and great name in arms
Holds from all soldiers chief majority
And military title capital
Through all the kingdoms that acknowledge Christ:
Thrice hath this Hotspur, Mars in swathling clothes,
This infant warrior, in his enterprises
Discomfited great Douglas, ta'en him once,
Enlarged him and made a friend of him,
To fill the mouth of deep defiance up
And shake the peace and safety of our throne.
And what say you to this? Percy, Northumberland,
The Archbishop's grace of York, Douglas, Mortimer,
Capitulate against us and are up.
But wherefore do I tell these news to thee?
Why, Harry, do I tell thee of my foes,
Which art my near'st and dearest enemy?
Thou that art like enough, through vassal fear,
Base inclination and the start of spleen
To fight against me under Percy's pay,
To dog his heels and curtsy at his frowns,
To show how much thou art degenerate.

Henry V. Do not think so; you shall not find it so:
And God forgive them that so much have sway'd
Your majesty's good thoughts away from me!
I will redeem all this on Percy's head
And in the closing of some glorious day
Be bold to tell you that I am your son;
When I will wear a garment all of blood
And stain my favours in a bloody mask,
Which, wash'd away, shall scour my shame with it:
And that shall be the day, whene'er it lights,
That this same child of honour and renown,
This gallant Hotspur, this all-praised knight,
And your unthought-of Harry chance to meet.
For every honour sitting on his helm,
Would they were multitudes, and on my head
My shames redoubled! for the time will come,
That I shall make this northern youth exchange
His glorious deeds for my indignities.
Percy is but my factor, good my lord,
To engross up glorious deeds on my behalf;
And I will call him to so strict account,
That he shall render every glory up,
Yea, even the slightest worship of his time,
Or I will tear the reckoning from his heart.
This, in the name of God, I promise here:
The which if He be pleased I shall perform,
I do beseech your majesty may salve
The long-grown wounds of my intemperance:
If not, the end of life cancels all bands;
And I will die a hundred thousand deaths
Ere break the smallest parcel of this vow.


124

III,3,2103

Hostess Quickly. My lord, I pray you, hear me.

Henry V. What sayest thou, Mistress Quickly? How doth thy
husband? I love him well; he is an honest man.


125

III,3,2107

Falstaff. Prithee, let her alone, and list to me.

Henry V. What sayest thou, Jack?


126

III,3,2111

Falstaff. The other night I fell asleep here behind the arras
and had my pocket picked: this house is turned
bawdy-house; they pick pockets.

Henry V. What didst thou lose, Jack?


127

III,3,2115

Falstaff. Wilt thou believe me, Hal? three or four bonds of
forty pound apiece, and a seal-ring of my
grandfather's.

Henry V. A trifle, some eight-penny matter.


128

III,3,2120

Hostess Quickly. So I told him, my lord; and I said I heard your
grace say so: and, my lord, he speaks most vilely
of you, like a foul-mouthed man as he is; and said
he would cudgel you.

Henry V. What! he did not?


129

III,3,2137

Falstaff. What beast! why, an otter.

Henry V. An otter, Sir John! Why an otter?


130

III,3,2142

Hostess Quickly. Thou art an unjust man in saying so: thou or any
man knows where to have me, thou knave, thou!

Henry V. Thou sayest true, hostess; and he slanders thee most grossly.


131

III,3,2145

Hostess Quickly. So he doth you, my lord; and said this other day you
ought him a thousand pound.

Henry V. Sirrah, do I owe you a thousand pound?


132

III,3,2153

Falstaff. Yea, if he said my ring was copper.

Henry V. I say 'tis copper: darest thou be as good as thy word now?


133

III,3,2157

Falstaff. Why, Hal, thou knowest, as thou art but man, I dare:
but as thou art prince, I fear thee as I fear the
roaring of a lion's whelp.

Henry V. And why not as the lion?


134

III,3,2161

Falstaff. The king is to be feared as the lion: dost thou
think I'll fear thee as I fear thy father? nay, an
I do, I pray God my girdle break.

Henry V. O, if it should, how would thy guts fall about thy
knees! But, sirrah, there's no room for faith,
truth, nor honesty in this bosom of thine; it is all
filled up with guts and midriff. Charge an honest
woman with picking thy pocket! why, thou whoreson,
impudent, embossed rascal, if there were anything in
thy pocket but tavern-reckonings, memorandums of
bawdy-houses, and one poor penny-worth of
sugar-candy to make thee long-winded, if thy pocket
were enriched with any other injuries but these, I
am a villain: and yet you will stand to if; you will
not pocket up wrong: art thou not ashamed?


135

III,3,2178

Falstaff. Dost thou hear, Hal? thou knowest in the state of
innocency Adam fell; and what should poor Jack
Falstaff do in the days of villany? Thou seest I
have more flesh than another man, and therefore more
frailty. You confess then, you picked my pocket?

Henry V. It appears so by the story.


136

III,3,2187

Falstaff. Hostess, I forgive thee: go, make ready breakfast;
love thy husband, look to thy servants, cherish thy
guests: thou shalt find me tractable to any honest
reason: thou seest I am pacified still. Nay,
prithee, be gone.
[Exit Hostess]
Now Hal, to the news at court: for the robbery,
lad, how is that answered?

Henry V. O, my sweet beef, I must still be good angel to
thee: the money is paid back again.


137

III,3,2190

Falstaff. O, I do not like that paying back; 'tis a double labour.

Henry V. I am good friends with my father and may do any thing.


138

III,3,2194

Lord Bardolph. Do, my lord.

Henry V. I have procured thee, Jack, a charge of foot.


139

III,3,2201

Falstaff. I would it had been of horse. Where shall I find
one that can steal well? O for a fine thief, of the
age of two and twenty or thereabouts! I am
heinously unprovided. Well, God be thanked for
these rebels, they offend none but the virtuous: I
laud them, I praise them.

Henry V. Bardolph!


140

III,3,2203

Lord Bardolph. My lord?

Henry V. Go bear this letter to Lord John of Lancaster, to my
brother John; this to my Lord of Westmoreland.
[Exit Bardolph]
Go, Peto, to horse, to horse; for thou and I have
thirty miles to ride yet ere dinner time.
[Exit Peto]
Jack, meet me to-morrow in the temple hall at two
o'clock in the afternoon.
There shalt thou know thy charge; and there receive
Money and order for their furniture.
The land is burning; Percy stands on high;
And either we or they must lower lie.


141

IV,2,2418

(stage directions). [Enter the PRINCE and WESTMORELAND]

Henry V. How now, blown Jack! how now, quilt!


142

IV,2,2429

Falstaff. Tut, never fear me: I am as vigilant as a cat to
steal cream.

Henry V. I think, to steal cream indeed, for thy theft hath
already made thee butter. But tell me, Jack, whose
fellows are these that come after?


143

IV,2,2433

Falstaff. Mine, Hal, mine.

Henry V. I did never see such pitiful rascals.


144

IV,2,2442

Falstaff. 'Faith, for their poverty, I know not where they had
that; and for their bareness, I am sure they never
learned that of me.

Henry V. No I'll be sworn; unless you call three fingers on
the ribs bare. But, sirrah, make haste: Percy is
already in the field.


145

V,1,2624

Henry IV. How bloodily the sun begins to peer
Above yon busky hill! the day looks pale
At his distemperature.

Henry V. The southern wind
Doth play the trumpet to his purposes,
And by his hollow whistling in the leaves
Foretells a tempest and a blustering day.


146

V,1,2652

Falstaff. Rebellion lay in his way, and he found it.

Henry V. Peace, chewet, peace!


147

V,1,2706

Henry IV. These things indeed you have articulate,
Proclaim'd at market-crosses, read in churches,
To face the garment of rebellion
With some fine colour that may please the eye
Of fickle changelings and poor discontents,
Which gape and rub the elbow at the news
Of hurlyburly innovation:
And never yet did insurrection want
Such water-colours to impaint his cause;
Nor moody beggars, starving for a time
Of pellmell havoc and confusion.

Henry V. In both your armies there is many a soul
Shall pay full dearly for this encounter,
If once they join in trial. Tell your nephew,
The Prince of Wales doth join with all the world
In praise of Henry Percy: by my hopes,
This present enterprise set off his head,
I do not think a braver gentleman,
More active-valiant or more valiant-young,
More daring or more bold, is now alive
To grace this latter age with noble deeds.
For my part, I may speak it to my shame,
I have a truant been to chivalry;
And so I hear he doth account me too;
Yet this before my father's majesty—
I am content that he shall take the odds
Of his great name and estimation,
And will, to save the blood on either side,
Try fortune with him in a single fight.


148

V,1,2739

(stage directions). [Exeunt WORCESTER and VERNON]

Henry V. It will not be accepted, on my life:
The Douglas and the Hotspur both together
Are confident against the world in arms.


149

V,1,2748

Falstaff. Hal, if thou see me down in the battle and bestride
me, so; 'tis a point of friendship.

Henry V. Nothing but a colossus can do thee that friendship.
Say thy prayers, and farewell.


150

V,1,2751

Falstaff. I would 'twere bed-time, Hal, and all well.

Henry V. Why, thou owest God a death.


151

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(stage directions). [Enter PRINCE HENRY]

Henry V. What, stand'st thou idle here? lend me thy sword:
Many a nobleman lies stark and stiff
Under the hoofs of vaunting enemies,
Whose deaths are yet unrevenged: I prithee,
lend me thy sword.


152

V,3,2933

Falstaff. O Hal, I prithee, give me leave to breathe awhile.
Turk Gregory never did such deeds in arms as I have
done this day. I have paid Percy, I have made him sure.

Henry V. He is, indeed; and living to kill thee. I prithee,
lend me thy sword.


153

V,3,2937

Falstaff. Nay, before God, Hal, if Percy be alive, thou get'st
not my sword; but take my pistol, if thou wilt.

Henry V. Give it to me: what, is it in the case?


154

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(stage directions). [PRINCE HENRY draws it out, and finds it to be a bottle of sack]

Henry V. What, is it a time to jest and dally now?


155

V,4,2954

Prince John. Not I, my lord, unless I did bleed too.

Henry V. I beseech your majesty, make up,
Lest your retirement do amaze your friends.


156

V,4,2959

Earl of Westmoreland. Come, my lord, I'll lead you to your tent.

Henry V. Lead me, my lord? I do not need your help:
And God forbid a shallow scratch should drive
The Prince of Wales from such a field as this,
Where stain'd nobility lies trodden on,
and rebels' arms triumph in massacres!


157

V,4,2967

(stage directions). [Exeunt LANCASTER and WESTMORELAND]

Henry V. By God, thou hast deceived me, Lancaster;
I did not think thee lord of such a spirit:
Before, I loved thee as a brother, John;
But now, I do respect thee as my soul.


158

V,4,2974

Henry IV. I saw him hold Lord Percy at the point
With lustier maintenance than I did look for
Of such an ungrown warrior.

Henry V. O, this boy
Lends mettle to us all!


159

V,4,2993

(stage directions). [They fight. KING HENRY being in danger, PRINCE HENRY enters]

Henry V. Hold up thy head, vile Scot, or thou art like
Never to hold it up again! the spirits
Of valiant Shirley, Stafford, Blunt, are in my arms:
It is the Prince of Wales that threatens thee;
Who never promiseth but he means to pay.
[They fight: DOUGLAS flies]
Cheerly, my lord. how fares your grace?
Sir Nicholas Gawsey hath for succor sent,
And so hath Clifton: I'll to Clifton straight.


160

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Henry IV. Stay, and breathe awhile:
Thou hast redeem'd thy lost opinion,
And show'd thou makest some tender of my life,
In this fair rescue thou hast brought to me.

Henry V. O God! they did me too much injury
That ever said I hearken'd for your death.
If it were so, I might have let alone
The insulting hand of Douglas over you,
Which would have been as speedy in your end
As all the poisonous potions in the world
And saved the treacherous labour of your son.


161

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Hotspur (Henry Percy). If I mistake not, thou art Harry Monmouth.

Henry V. Thou speak'st as if I would deny my name.


162

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Hotspur (Henry Percy). My name is Harry Percy.

Henry V. Why, then I see
A very valiant rebel of the name.
I am the Prince of Wales; and think not, Percy,
To share with me in glory any more:
Two stars keep not their motion in one sphere;
Nor can one England brook a double reign,
Of Harry Percy and the Prince of Wales.


163

V,4,3029

Hotspur (Henry Percy). Nor shall it, Harry; for the hour is come
To end the one of us; and would to God
Thy name in arms were now as great as mine!

Henry V. I'll make it greater ere I part from thee;
And all the budding honours on thy crest
I'll crop, to make a garland for my head.


164

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(stage directions). [Dies]

Henry V. For worms, brave Percy: fare thee well, great heart!
Ill-weaved ambition, how much art thou shrunk!
When that this body did contain a spirit,
A kingdom for it was too small a bound;
But now two paces of the vilest earth
Is room enough: this earth that bears thee dead
Bears not alive so stout a gentleman.
If thou wert sensible of courtesy,
I should not make so dear a show of zeal:
But let my favours hide thy mangled face;
And, even in thy behalf, I'll thank myself
For doing these fair rites of tenderness.
Adieu, and take thy praise with thee to heaven!
Thy ignominy sleep with thee in the grave,
But not remember'd in thy epitaph!
[He spieth FALSTAFF on the ground]
What, old acquaintance! could not all this flesh
Keep in a little life? Poor Jack, farewell!
I could have better spared a better man:
O, I should have a heavy miss of thee,
If I were much in love with vanity!
Death hath not struck so fat a deer to-day,
Though many dearer, in this bloody fray.
Embowell'd will I see thee by and by:
Till then in blood by noble Percy lie.


165

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(stage directions). [Re-enter PRINCE HENRY and LORD JOHN OF LANCASTER]

Henry V. Come, brother John; full bravely hast thou flesh'd
Thy maiden sword.


166

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Prince John. But, soft! whom have we here?
Did you not tell me this fat man was dead?

Henry V. I did; I saw him dead,
Breathless and bleeding on the ground. Art
thou alive?
Or is it fantasy that plays upon our eyesight?
I prithee, speak; we will not trust our eyes
Without our ears: thou art not what thou seem'st.


167

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Falstaff. No, that's certain; I am not a double man: but if I
be not Jack Falstaff, then am I a Jack. There is Percy:
[Throwing the body down]
if your father will do me any honour, so; if not, let
him kill the next Percy himself. I look to be either
earl or duke, I can assure you.

Henry V. Why, Percy I killed myself and saw thee dead.


168

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Prince John. This is the strangest tale that ever I heard.

Henry V. This is the strangest fellow, brother John.
Come, bring your luggage nobly on your back:
For my part, if a lie may do thee grace,
I'll gild it with the happiest terms I have.
[A retreat is sounded]
The trumpet sounds retreat; the day is ours.
Come, brother, let us to the highest of the field,
To see what friends are living, who are dead.


169

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Henry IV. Bear Worcester to the death and Vernon too:
Other offenders we will pause upon.
[Exeunt WORCESTER and VERNON, guarded]
How goes the field?

Henry V. The noble Scot, Lord Douglas, when he saw
The fortune of the day quite turn'd from him,
The noble Percy slain, and all his men
Upon the foot of fear, fled with the rest;
And falling from a hill, he was so bruised
That the pursuers took him. At my tent
The Douglas is; and I beseech your grace
I may dispose of him.


170

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Henry IV. With all my heart.

Henry V. Then, brother John of Lancaster, to you
This honourable bounty shall belong:
Go to the Douglas, and deliver him
Up to his pleasure, ransomless and free:
His valour shown upon our crests to-day
Hath taught us how to cherish such high deeds
Even in the bosom of our adversaries.


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