Speeches (Lines) for Henry IV
in "Richard II"

Total: 90

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,23

Many years of happy days befal
My gracious sovereign, my most loving liege!

2

I,1,33

First, heaven be the record to my speech!
In the devotion of a subject's love,...

3

I,1,72

Pale trembling coward, there I throw my gage,
Disclaiming here the kindred of the king,...

4

I,1,90

Look, what I speak, my life shall prove it true;
That Mowbray hath received eight thousand nobles...

5

I,1,192

O, God defend my soul from such deep sin!
Shall I seem crest-fall'n in my father's sight?...

6

I,3,330

Harry of Hereford, Lancaster and Derby
Am I; who ready here do stand in arms,...

7

I,3,341

Lord marshal, let me kiss my sovereign's hand,
And bow my knee before his majesty:...

8

I,3,354

O let no noble eye profane a tear
For me, if I be gored with Mowbray's spear:...

9

I,3,379

Mine innocency and Saint George to thrive!

10

I,3,397

Strong as a tower in hope, I cry amen.

11

I,3,441

Your will be done: this must my comfort be,
Sun that warms you here shall shine on me;...

12

I,3,488

I swear.

13

I,3,490

Norfolk, so far as to mine enemy:—
By this time, had the king permitted us,...

14

I,3,513

How long a time lies in one little word!
Four lagging winters and four wanton springs...

15

I,3,556

I have too few to take my leave of you,
When the tongue's office should be prodigal...

16

I,3,560

Joy absent, grief is present for that time.

17

I,3,562

To men in joy; but grief makes one hour ten.

18

I,3,564

My heart will sigh when I miscall it so,
Which finds it an inforced pilgrimage.

19

I,3,569

Nay, rather, every tedious stride I make
Will but remember me what a deal of world...

20

I,3,595

O, who can hold a fire in his hand
By thinking on the frosty Caucasus?...

21

I,3,607

Then, England's ground, farewell; sweet soil, adieu;
My mother, and my nurse, that bears me yet!...

22

II,3,1153

How far is it, my lord, to Berkeley now?

23

II,3,1171

Of much less value is my company
Than your good words. But who comes here?

24

II,3,1199

I thank thee, gentle Percy; and be sure
I count myself in nothing else so happy...

25

II,3,1214

Welcome, my lords. I wot your love pursues
A banish'd traitor: all my treasury...

26

II,3,1220

Evermore thanks, the exchequer of the poor;
Which, till my infant fortune comes to years,...

27

II,3,1226

My lord, my answer is—to Lancaster;
And I am come to seek that name in England;...

28

II,3,1238

I shall not need transport my words by you;
Here comes his grace in person. My noble uncle!

29

II,3,1243

My gracious uncle—

30

II,3,1264

My gracious uncle, let me know my fault:
On what condition stands it and wherein?

31

II,3,1271

As I was banish'd, I was banish'd Hereford;
But as I come, I come for Lancaster....

32

II,3,1320

An offer, uncle, that we will accept:
But we must win your grace to go with usTo Bristol castle, which they say is held...

33

III,1,1360

Bring forth these men.
Bushy and Green, I will not vex your souls—...

34

III,1,1394

My Lord Northumberland, see them dispatch'd.
[Exeunt NORTHUMBERLAND and others, with the]...

35

III,1,1403

Thank, gentle uncle. Come, lords, away.
To fight with Glendower and his complices:...

36

III,3,1635

So that by this intelligence we learn
The Welshmen are dispersed, and Salisbury...

37

III,3,1650

Mistake not, uncle, further than you should.

38

III,3,1653

I know it, uncle, and oppose not myself
Against their will. But who comes here?...

39

III,3,1659

Royally!
Why, it contains no king?

40

III,3,1668

Noble lords,
Go to the rude ribs of that ancient castle;...

41

III,3,1829

What says his majesty?

42

III,3,1834

Stand all apart,
And show fair duty to his majesty....

43

III,3,1844

My gracious lord, I come but for mine own.

44

III,3,1846

So far be mine, my most redoubted lord,
As my true service shall deserve your love.

45

III,3,1857

Yea, my good lord.

46

IV,1,1982

Call forth Bagot.
Now, Bagot, freely speak thy mind;...

47

IV,1,1988

Cousin, stand forth, and look upon that man.

48

IV,1,2012

Bagot, forbear; thou shalt not take it up.

49

IV,1,2069

These differences shall all rest under gage
Till Norfolk be repeal'd: repeal'd he shall be,...

50

IV,1,2084

Why, bishop, is Norfolk dead?

51

IV,1,2086

Sweet peace conduct his sweet soul to the bosom
Of good old Abraham! Lords appellants,...

52

IV,1,2097

In God's name, I'll ascend the regal throne.

53

IV,1,2139

Fetch hither Richard, that in common view
He may surrender; so we shall proceed...

54

IV,1,2144

Lords, you that here are under our arrest,
Procure your sureties for your days of answer....

55

IV,1,2178

I thought you had been willing to resign.

56

IV,1,2182

Part of your cares you give me with your crown.

57

IV,1,2188

Are you contented to resign the crown?

58

IV,1,2257

Go some of you and fetch a looking-glass.

59

IV,1,2261

Urge it no more, my Lord Northumberland.

60

IV,1,2284

The shadow of your sorrow hath destroy'd
The shadow or your face.

61

IV,1,2298

Name it, fair cousin.

62

IV,1,2304

Yet ask.

63

IV,1,2306

You shall.

64

IV,1,2308

Whither?

65

IV,1,2310

Go, some of you convey him to the Tower.

66

IV,1,2314

On Wednesday next we solemnly set down
Our coronation: lords, prepare yourselves....

67

V,3,2575

Can no man tell me of my unthrifty son?
'Tis full three months since I did see him last;...

68

V,3,2589

And what said the gallant?

69

V,3,2594

As dissolute as desperate; yet through both
I see some sparks of better hope, which elder years...

70

V,3,2599

What means our cousin, that he stares and looks
So wildly?

71

V,3,2603

Withdraw yourselves, and leave us here alone.
[Exeunt HENRY PERCY and Lords]...

72

V,3,2609

Intended or committed was this fault?
If on the first, how heinous e'er it be,...

73

V,3,2614

Have thy desire.

74

V,3,2617

Villain, I'll make thee safe.

75

V,3,2624

What is the matter, uncle? speak;
Recover breath; tell us how near is danger,...

76

V,3,2637

O heinous, strong and bold conspiracy!
O loyal father of a treacherous son!...

77

V,3,2654

What shrill-voiced suppliant makes this eager cry?

78

V,3,2658

Our scene is alter'd from a serious thing,
And now changed to 'The Beggar and the King.'...

79

V,3,2673

Rise up, good aunt.

80

V,3,2693

Good aunt, stand up.

81

V,3,2712

Good aunt, stand up.

82

V,3,2715

I pardon him, as God shall pardon me.

83

V,3,2720

With all my heart
I pardon him.

84

V,3,2723

But for our trusty brother-in-law and the abbot,
With all the rest of that consorted crew,...

85

V,6,2880

Kind uncle York, the latest news we hear
Is that the rebels have consumed with fire...

86

V,6,2891

We thank thee, gentle Percy, for thy pains;
And to thy worth will add right worthy gains.

87

V,6,2898

Thy pains, Fitzwater, shall not be forgot;
Right noble is thy merit, well I wot.

88

V,6,2906

Carlisle, this is your doom:
Choose out some secret place, some reverend room,...

89

V,6,2917

Exton, I thank thee not; for thou hast wrought
A deed of slander with thy fatal hand...

90

V,6,2921

They love not poison that do poison need,
Nor do I thee: though I did wish him dead,...

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