Speeches (Lines) for Gremio
in "Taming of the Shrew"

Total: 58

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,351

To cart her rather. She's too rough for me.
There, there, Hortensio, will you any wife?

2

I,1,363

And me, too, good Lord!

3

I,1,384

Why will you mew her up,
Signior Baptista, for this fiend of hell,
And make her bear the penance of her tongue?

4

I,1,402

You may go to the devil's dam; your gifts are so good
here's none will hold you. There! Love is not so great,
Hortensio, but we may blow our nails together, and fast it fairly
out; our cake's dough on both sides. Farewell; yet, for the love
I bear my sweet Bianca, if I can by any means light on a fit man
to teach her that wherein she delights, I will wish him to her
father.

5

I,1,414

What's that, I pray?

6

I,1,416

A husband? a devil.

7

I,1,418

I say a devil. Think'st thou, Hortensio, though her father
be very rich, any man is so very a fool to be married to hell?

8

I,1,424

I cannot tell; but I had as lief take her dowry with this
condition: to be whipp'd at the high cross every morning.

9

I,1,433

I am agreed; and would I had given him the best horse in
Padua to begin his wooing that would thoroughly woo her, wed her,
and bed her, and rid the house of her! Come on.

10

I,2,692

O, very well; I have perus'd the note.
Hark you, sir; I'll have them very fairly bound-
All books of love, see that at any hand;
And see you read no other lectures to her.
You understand me- over and beside
Signior Baptista's liberality,
I'll mend it with a largess. Take your paper too,
And let me have them very well perfum'd;
For she is sweeter than perfume itself
To whom they go to. What will you read to her?

11

I,2,707

O this learning, what a thing it is!

12

I,2,712

And you are well met, Signior Hortensio.
Trow you whither I am going? To Baptista Minola.
I promis'd to enquire carefully
About a schoolmaster for the fair Bianca;
And by good fortune I have lighted well
On this young man; for learning and behaviour
Fit for her turn, well read in poetry
And other books- good ones, I warrant ye.

13

I,2,725

Beloved of me- and that my deeds shall prove.

14

I,2,734

So said, so done, is well.
Hortensio, have you told him all her faults?

15

I,2,738

No, say'st me so, friend? What countryman?

16

I,2,742

O Sir, such a life with such a wife were strange!
But if you have a stomach, to't a God's name;
You shall have me assisting you in all.
But will you woo this wild-cat?

17

I,2,762

Hortensio, hark:
This gentleman is happily arriv'd,
My mind presumes, for his own good and ours.

18

I,2,767

And so we will- provided that he win her.

19

I,2,775

Hark you, sir, you mean not her to-

20

I,2,783

No; if without more words you will get you hence.

21

I,2,786

But so is not she.

22

I,2,788

For this reason, if you'll know,
That she's the choice love of Signior Gremio.

23

I,2,801

What, this gentleman will out-talk us all!

24

I,2,810

Yea, leave that labour to great Hercules,
And let it be more than Alcides' twelve.

25

II,1,880

Good morrow, neighbour Baptista.

26

II,1,886

You are too blunt; go to it orderly.

27

II,1,913

Saving your tale, Petruchio, I pray,
Let us that are poor petitioners speak too.
Bacare! you are marvellous forward.

28

II,1,917

I doubt it not, sir; but you will curse your wooing.
Neighbour, this is a gift very grateful, I am sure of it. To
express the like kindness, myself, that have been more kindly
beholding to you than any, freely give unto you this young
scholar [Presenting LUCENTIO] that hath been long studying at
Rheims; as cunning in Greek, Latin, and other languages, as the
other in music and mathematics. His name is Cambio. Pray accept
his service.

29

II,1,1151

Hark, Petruchio; she says she'll see thee hang'd first.

30

II,1,1171

[with TRANIO:] Amen, say we; we will be witnesses.

31

II,1,1177

Was ever match clapp'd up so suddenly?

32

II,1,1183

No doubt but he hath got a quiet catch.
But now, Baptista, to your younger daughter:
Now is the day we long have looked for;
I am your neighbour, and was suitor first.

33

II,1,1189

Youngling, thou canst not love so dear as I.

34

II,1,1191

But thine doth fry.
Skipper, stand back; 'tis age that nourisheth.

35

II,1,1199

First, as you know, my house within the city
Is richly furnished with plate and gold,
Basins and ewers to lave her dainty hands;
My hangings all of Tyrian tapestry;
In ivory coffers I have stuff'd my crowns;
In cypress chests my arras counterpoints,
Costly apparel, tents, and canopies,
Fine linen, Turkey cushions boss'd with pearl,
Valance of Venice gold in needle-work;
Pewter and brass, and all things that belongs
To house or housekeeping. Then at my farm
I have a hundred milch-kine to the pail,
Six score fat oxen standing in my stalls,
And all things answerable to this portion.
Myself am struck in years, I must confess;
And if I die to-morrow this is hers,
If whilst I live she will be only mine.

36

II,1,1225

Two thousand ducats by the year of land!
[Aside] My land amounts not to so much in all.-
That she shall have, besides an argosy
That now is lying in Marseilles road.
What, have I chok'd you with an argosy?

37

II,1,1234

Nay, I have off'red all; I have no more;
And she can have no more than all I have;
If you like me, she shall have me and mine.

38

II,1,1244

And may not young men die as well as old?

39

II,1,1252

Adieu, good neighbour. Exit BAPTISTA
Now, I fear thee not.
Sirrah young gamester, your father were a fool
To give thee all, and in his waning age
Set foot under thy table. Tut, a toy!
An old Italian fox is not so kind, my boy. Exit

40

III,2,1512

As willingly as e'er I came from school.

41

III,2,1514

A bridegroom, say you? 'Tis a groom indeed,
A grumbling groom, and that the girl shall find.

42

III,2,1517

Why, he's a devil, a devil, a very fiend.

43

III,2,1519

Tut, she's a lamb, a dove, a fool, to him!
I'll tell you, Sir Lucentio: when the priest
Should ask if Katherine should be his wife,
'Ay, by gogs-wouns' quoth he, and swore so loud
That, all amaz'd, the priest let fall the book;
And as he stoop'd again to take it up,
This mad-brain'd bridegroom took him such a cuff
That down fell priest and book, and book and priest.
'Now take them up,' quoth he 'if any list.'

44

III,2,1529

Trembled and shook, for why he stamp'd and swore
As if the vicar meant to cozen him.
But after many ceremonies done
He calls for wine: 'A health!' quoth he, as if
He had been abroad, carousing to his mates
After a storm; quaff'd off the muscadel,
And threw the sops all in the sexton's face,
Having no other reason
But that his beard grew thin and hungerly
And seem'd to ask him sops as he was drinking.
This done, he took the bride about the neck,
And kiss'd her lips with such a clamorous smack
That at the parting all the church did echo.
And I, seeing this, came thence for very shame;
And after me, I know, the rout is coming.
Such a mad marriage never was before.
Hark, hark! I hear the minstrels play. [Music plays]
Enter PETRUCHIO, KATHERINA, BIANCA, BAPTISTA, HORTENSIO, GRUMIO, and train

45

III,2,1563

Let me entreat you.

46

III,2,1584

Ay, marry, sir, now it begins to work.

47

III,2,1608

Went they not quickly, I should die with laughing.

48

III,2,1612

I warrant him, Petruchio is Kated.

49

V,1,2356

I marvel Cambio comes not all this while.

50

V,1,2364

They're busy within; you were best knock louder.

51

V,1,2432

Stay, Officer; he shall not go to prison.

52

V,1,2434

Take heed, Signior Baptista, lest you be cony-catch'd in
this business; I dare swear this is the right Vincentio.

53

V,1,2437

Nay, I dare not swear it.

54

V,1,2439

Yes, I know thee to be Signior Lucentio.

55

V,1,2456

Here's packing, with a witness, to deceive us all!

56

V,1,2477

My cake is dough, but I'll in among the rest;
Out of hope of all but my share of the feast. Exit

57

V,2,2530

Believe me, sir, they butt together well.

58

V,2,2582

Ay, and a kind one too.
Pray God, sir, your wife send you not a worse.

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