Speeches (Lines) for Goneril
in "King Lear"

Total: 53

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,55

Sir, I love you more than words can wield the matter;
Dearer than eyesight, space, and liberty;...

2

I,1,300

Prescribe not us our duties.

3

I,1,310

Sister, it is not little I have to say of what most nearly
appertains to us both. I think our father will hence to-night.

4

I,1,313

You see how full of changes his age is. The observation we
have made of it hath not been little. He always lov'd our...

5

I,1,319

The best and soundest of his time hath been but rash; then
must we look to receive from his age, not alone the...

6

I,1,326

There is further compliment of leave-taking between France and
him. Pray you let's hit together. If our father carry authority...

7

I,1,331

We must do something, and i' th' heat.

8

I,3,505

Did my father strike my gentleman for chiding of his fool?

9

I,3,507

By day and night, he wrongs me! Every hour
He flashes into one gross crime or other...

10

I,3,517

Put on what weary negligence you please,
You and your fellows. I'd have it come to question....

11

I,3,528

And let his knights have colder looks among you.
What grows of it, no matter. Advise your fellows so....

12

I,4,722

Not only, sir, this your all-licens'd fool,
But other of your insolent retinue...

13

I,4,741

Come, sir,
I would you would make use of that good wisdom...

14

I,4,759

This admiration, sir, is much o' th' savour
Of other your new pranks. I do beseech you...

15

I,4,779

You strike my people, and your disorder'd rabble
Make servants of their betters.

16

I,4,818

Never afflict yourself to know the cause;
But let his disposition have that scope...

17

I,4,841

Do you mark that, my lord?

18

I,4,844

Pray you, content.- What, Oswald, ho!
[To the Fool] You, sir, more knave than fool, after your master!

19

I,4,852

This man hath had good counsel! A hundred knights?
'Tis politic and safe to let him keep...

20

I,4,859

Safer than trust too far.
Let me still take away the harms I fear,...

21

I,4,868

Take you some company, and away to horse!
Inform her full of my particular fear,...

22

I,4,879

Nay then-

23

II,4,1488

Why not by th' hand, sir? How have I offended?
All's not offence that indiscretion finds...

24

II,4,1513

At your choice, sir.

25

II,4,1541

Why might not you, my lord, receive attendance
From those that she calls servants, or from mine?

26

II,4,1560

Hear, me, my lord.
What need you five-and-twenty, ten, or five,...

27

II,4,1592

'Tis his own blame; hath put himself from rest
And must needs taste his folly.

28

II,4,1596

So am I purpos'd.
Where is my Lord of Gloucester?

29

II,4,1605

My lord, entreat him by no means to stay.

30

III,7,2126

Pluck out his eyes.

31

III,7,2141

Farewell, sweet lord, and sister.

32

IV,2,2338

Welcome, my lord. I marvel our mild husband
Not met us on the way. [Enter Oswald the Steward.]...

33

IV,2,2350

[to Edmund] Then shall you go no further.
It is the cowish terror of his spirit,...

34

IV,2,2366

My most dear Gloucester!
O, the difference of man and man!...

35

IV,2,2372

I have been worth the whistle.

36

IV,2,2381

No more! The text is foolish.

37

IV,2,2395

Milk-liver'd man!
That bear'st a cheek for blows, a head for wrongs;...

38

IV,2,2408

O vain fool!

39

IV,2,2415

Marry, your manhood mew!

40

IV,2,2435

[aside] One way I like this well;
But being widow, and my Gloucester with her,...

41

V,1,3045

[aside] I had rather lose the battle than that sister
Should loosen him and me.

42

V,1,3057

Combine together 'gainst the enemy;
For these domestic and particular broils...

43

V,1,3064

No.

44

V,1,3066

[aside] O, ho, I know the riddle.- I will go.
[As they are going out,] enter Edgar [disguised].

45

V,3,3197

Not so hot!
In his own grace he doth exalt himself...

46

V,3,3202

That were the most if he should husband you.

47

V,3,3204

Holla, holla!
That eye that told you so look'd but asquint.

48

V,3,3212

Mean you to enjoy him?

49

V,3,3226

An interlude!

50

V,3,3235

[aside] If not, I'll ne'er trust medicine.

51

V,3,3302

This is mere practice, Gloucester.
By th' law of arms thou wast not bound to answer...

52

V,3,3311

Say if I do- the laws are mine, not thine.
Who can arraign me for't?

53

V,3,3315

Ask me not what I know. Exit.

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