Speeches (Lines) for Earl of Gloucester
in "King Lear"

Total: 118

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,4

It did always seem so to us; but now, in the division of the
kingdom, it appears not which of the Dukes he values most, for...

2

I,1,9

His breeding, sir, hath been at my charge. I have so often
blush'd to acknowledge him that now I am braz'd to't.

3

I,1,12

Sir, this young fellow's mother could; whereupon she grew
round-womb'd, and had indeed, sir, a son for her cradle ere she...

4

I,1,17

But I have, sir, a son by order of law, some year elder than
this, who yet is no dearer in my account. Though this knave came...

5

I,1,24

My Lord of Kent. Remember him hereafter as my honourable
friend.

6

I,1,29

He hath been out nine years, and away he shall again.
[Sound a sennet.]...

7

I,1,34

I shall, my liege.

8

I,1,202

Here's France and Burgundy, my noble lord.

9

I,2,357

Kent banish'd thus? and France in choler parted?
And the King gone to-night? subscrib'd his pow'r?...

10

I,2,363

Why so earnestly seek you to put up that letter?

11

I,2,365

What paper were you reading?

12

I,2,367

No? What needed then that terrible dispatch of it into your
pocket? The quality of nothing hath not such need to hide...

13

I,2,374

Give me the letter, sir.

14

I,2,377

Let's see, let's see!

15

I,2,380

[reads] 'This policy and reverence of age makes the world
bitter to the best of our times; keeps our fortunes from us...

16

I,2,394

You know the character to be your brother's?

17

I,2,397

It is his.

18

I,2,400

Hath he never before sounded you in this business?

19

I,2,404

O villain, villain! His very opinion in the letter! Abhorred
villain! Unnatural, detested, brutish villain! worse than...

20

I,2,416

Think you so?

21

I,2,421

He cannot be such a monster.

22

I,2,423

To his father, that so tenderly and entirely loves him.
Heaven and earth! Edmund, seek him out; wind me into him, I pray...

23

I,2,429

These late eclipses in the sun and moon portend no good to
us. Though the wisdom of nature can reason it thus and thus, yet...

24

II,1,967

Now, Edmund, where's the villain?

25

II,1,971

But where is he?

26

II,1,973

Where is the villain, Edmund?

27

II,1,975

Pursue him, ho! Go after. [Exeunt some Servants].
By no means what?

28

II,1,990

Let him fly far.
Not in this land shall he remain uncaught;...

29

II,1,1012

Strong and fast'ned villain!
Would he deny his letter? I never got him....

30

II,1,1027

O madam, my old heart is crack'd, it's crack'd!

31

II,1,1030

O lady, lady, shame would have it hid!

32

II,1,1033

I know not, madam. 'Tis too bad, too bad!

33

II,1,1046

He did bewray his practice, and receiv'd
This hurt you see, striving to apprehend him.

34

II,1,1049

Ay, my good lord.

35

II,1,1059

For him I thank your Grace.

36

II,1,1071

I serve you, madam.
Your Graces are right welcome.

37

II,2,1117

Weapons? arms? What's the matter here?

38

II,2,1153

How fell you out? Say that.

39

II,2,1213

Let me beseech your Grace not to do so.
His fault is much, and the good King his master...

40

II,2,1228

I am sorry for thee, friend. 'Tis the Duke's pleasure,
Whose disposition, all the world well knows,...

41

II,2,1235

The Duke 's to blame in this; 'twill be ill taken. Exit.

42

II,4,1368

My dear lord,
You know the fiery quality of the Duke,...

43

II,4,1375

Well, my good lord, I have inform'd them so.

44

II,4,1377

Ay, my good lord.

45

II,4,1397

I would have all well betwixt you. Exit.

46

II,4,1601

The King is in high rage.

47

II,4,1603

He calls to horse, but will I know not whither.

48

II,4,1606

Alack, the night comes on, and the bleak winds
Do sorely ruffle. For many miles about...

49

III,3,1778

Alack, alack, Edmund, I like not this unnatural dealing! When
I desir'd their leave that I might pity him, they took from me...

50

III,3,1784

Go to; say you nothing. There is division betwixt the Dukes,
and a worse matter than that. I have received a letter this...

51

III,4,1922

What are you there? Your names?

52

III,4,1934

What, hath your Grace no better company?

53

III,4,1937

Our flesh and blood is grown so vile, my lord,
That it doth hate what gets it.

54

III,4,1940

Go in with me. My duty cannot suffer
T' obey in all your daughters' hard commands....

55

III,4,1955

Canst thou blame him? [Storm still.]
His daughters seek his death. Ah, that good Kent!...

56

III,4,1968

In, fellow, there, into th' hovel; keep thee warm.

57

III,4,1974

Take him you on.

58

III,4,1977

No words, no words! hush.

59

III,6,2007

Here is better than the open air; take it thankfully. I will
piece out the comfort with what addition I can. I will not be...

60

III,6,2087

Come hither, friend. Where is the King my master?

61

III,6,2089

Good friend, I prithee take him in thy arms.
I have o'erheard a plot of death upon him....

62

III,6,2104

Come, come, away!

63

III,7,2152

What mean, your Graces? Good my friends, consider
You are my guests. Do me no foul play, friends.

64

III,7,2157

Unmerciful lady as you are, I am none.

65

III,7,2160

By the kind gods, 'tis most ignobly done
To pluck me by the beard.

66

III,7,2163

Naughty lady,
These hairs which thou dost ravish from my chin...

67

III,7,2174

I have a letter guessingly set down,
Which came from one that's of a neutral heart,...

68

III,7,2180

To Dover.

69

III,7,2183

I am tied to th' stake, and I must stand the course.

70

III,7,2185

Because I would not see thy cruel nails
Pluck out his poor old eyes; nor thy fierce sister...

71

III,7,2198

He that will think to live till he be old,
Give me some help!- O cruel! O ye gods!

72

III,7,2218

All dark and comfortless! Where's my son Edmund?
Edmund, enkindle all the sparks of nature...

73

III,7,2225

O my follies! Then Edgar was abus'd.
Kind gods, forgive me that, and prosper him!

74

IV,1,2264

Away, get thee away! Good friend, be gone.
Thy comforts can do me no good at all;...

75

IV,1,2268

I have no way, and therefore want no eyes;
I stumbled when I saw. Full oft 'tis seen...

76

IV,1,2282

Is it a beggarman?

77

IV,1,2284

He has some reason, else he could not beg.
I' th' last night's storm I such a fellow saw,...

78

IV,1,2294

Is that the naked fellow?

79

IV,1,2296

Then prithee get thee gone. If for my sake
Thou wilt o'ertake us hence a mile or twain...

80

IV,1,2302

'Tis the time's plague when madmen lead the blind.
Do as I bid thee, or rather do thy pleasure....

81

IV,1,2307

Sirrah naked fellow-

82

IV,1,2309

Come hither, fellow.

83

IV,1,2311

Know'st thou the way to Dover?

84

IV,1,2319

Here, take this purse, thou whom the heavens' plagues
Have humbled to all strokes. That I am wretched...

85

IV,1,2328

There is a cliff, whose high and bending head
Looks fearfully in the confined deep....

86

IV,6,2597

When shall I come to th' top of that same hill?

87

IV,6,2599

Methinks the ground is even.

88

IV,6,2602

No, truly.

89

IV,6,2605

So may it be indeed.
Methinks thy voice is alter'd, and thou speak'st...

90

IV,6,2610

Methinks y'are better spoken.

91

IV,6,2625

Set me where you stand.

92

IV,6,2629

Let go my hand.
Here, friend, is another purse; in it a jewel...

93

IV,6,2635

With all my heart.

94

IV,6,2638

O you mighty gods! He kneels.
This world I do renounce, and, in your sights,...

95

IV,6,2655

Away, and let me die.

96

IV,6,2663

But have I fall'n, or no?

97

IV,6,2667

Alack, I have no eyes!
Is wretchedness depriv'd that benefit...

98

IV,6,2674

Too well, too well.

99

IV,6,2678

A poor unfortunate beggar.

100

IV,6,2684

I do remember now. Henceforth I'll bear
Affliction till it do cry out itself...

101

IV,6,2705

I know that voice.

102

IV,6,2714

The trick of that voice I do well remember.
Is't not the King?

103

IV,6,2741

O, let me kiss that hand!

104

IV,6,2743

O ruin'd piece of nature! This great world
Shall so wear out to naught. Dost thou know me?

105

IV,6,2748

Were all the letters suns, I could not see one.

106

IV,6,2752

What, with the case of eyes?

107

IV,6,2756

I see it feelingly.

108

IV,6,2762

Ay, sir.

109

IV,6,2786

Alack, alack the day!

110

IV,6,2831

You ever-gentle gods, take my breath from me;
Let not my worser spirit tempt me again...

111

IV,6,2835

Now, good sir, what are you?

112

IV,6,2840

Hearty thanks.
The bounty and the benison of heaven...

113

IV,6,2849

Now let thy friendly hand
Put strength enough to't.

114

IV,6,2876

What, is he dead?

115

IV,6,2899

The King is mad. How stiff is my vile sense,
That I stand up, and have ingenious feeling...

116

V,2,3111

Grace go with you, sir!

117

V,2,3117

No further, sir. A man may rot even here.

118

V,2,3121

And that's true too. Exeunt.

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