Speeches (Lines) for Glendower
in "Henry IV, Part I"

Total: 23

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

III,1,1549

No, here it is.
Sit, cousin Percy; sit, good cousin Hotspur,
For by that name as oft as Lancaster
Doth speak of you, his cheek looks pale and with
A rising sigh he wisheth you in heaven.

2

III,1,1555

I cannot blame him: at my nativity
The front of heaven was full of fiery shapes,
Of burning cressets; and at my birth
The frame and huge foundation of the earth
Shaked like a coward.

3

III,1,1563

I say the earth did shake when I was born.

4

III,1,1566

The heavens were all on fire, the earth did tremble.

5

III,1,1578

Cousin, of many men
I do not bear these crossings. Give me leave
To tell you once again that at my birth
The front of heaven was full of fiery shapes,
The goats ran from the mountains, and the herds
Were strangely clamorous to the frighted fields.
These signs have mark'd me extraordinary;
And all the courses of my life do show
I am not in the roll of common men.
Where is he living, clipp'd in with the sea
That chides the banks of England, Scotland, Wales,
Which calls me pupil, or hath read to me?
And bring him out that is but woman's son
Can trace me in the tedious ways of art
And hold me pace in deep experiments.

6

III,1,1596

I can call spirits from the vasty deep.

7

III,1,1599

Why, I can teach you, cousin, to command
The devil.

8

III,1,1607

Three times hath Henry Bolingbroke made head
Against my power; thrice from the banks of Wye
And sandy-bottom'd Severn have I sent him
Bootless home and weather-beaten back.

9

III,1,1613

Come, here's the map: shall we divide our right
According to our threefold order ta'en?

10

III,1,1634

A shorter time shall send me to you, lords:
And in my conduct shall your ladies come;
From whom you now must steal and take no leave,
For there will be a world of water shed
Upon the parting of your wives and you.

11

III,1,1649

Not wind? it shall, it must; you see it doth.

12

III,1,1659

I'll not have it alter'd.

13

III,1,1661

No, nor you shall not.

14

III,1,1663

Why, that will I.

15

III,1,1665

I can speak English, lord, as well as you;
For I was train'd up in the English court;
Where, being but young, I framed to the harp
Many an English ditty lovely well
And gave the tongue a helpful ornament,
A virtue that was never seen in you.

16

III,1,1680

Come, you shall have Trent turn'd.

17

III,1,1686

The moon shines fair; you may away by night:
I'll haste the writer and withal
Break with your wives of your departure hence:
I am afraid my daughter will run mad,
So much she doteth on her Mortimer.

18

III,1,1740

My daughter weeps: she will not part with you;
She'll be a soldier too, she'll to the wars.

19

III,1,1745

She is desperate here; a peevish self-wind harlotry,
one that no persuasion can do good upon.

20

III,1,1760

Nay, if you melt, then will she run mad.

21

III,1,1763

She bids you on the wanton rushes lay you down
And rest your gentle head upon her lap,
And she will sing the song that pleaseth you
And on your eyelids crown the god of sleep.
Charming your blood with pleasing heaviness,
Making such difference 'twixt wake and sleep
As is the difference betwixt day and night
The hour before the heavenly-harness'd team
Begins his golden progress in the east.

22

III,1,1774

Do so;
And those musicians that shall play to you
Hang in the air a thousand leagues from hence,
And straight they shall be here: sit, and attend.

23

III,1,1816

Come, come, Lord Mortimer; you are as slow
As hot Lord Percy is on fire to go.
By this our book is drawn; we'll but seal,
And then to horse immediately.

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