Speeches (Lines) for Gertrude
in "Hamlet"

Total: 69

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,270

Good Hamlet, cast thy nighted colour off,
And let thine eye look like a friend on Denmark....

2

I,2,277

If it be,
Why seems it so particular with thee?

3

I,2,321

Let not thy mother lose her prayers, Hamlet.
I pray thee stay with us, go not to Wittenberg.

4

II,2,1102

Good gentlemen, he hath much talk'd of you,
And sure I am two men there are not living...

5

II,2,1119

Thanks, Guildenstern and gentle Rosencrantz.
And I beseech you instantly to visit...

6

II,2,1125

Ay, amen!

7

II,2,1145

I doubt it is no other but the main,
His father's death and our o'erhasty marriage.

8

II,2,1190

More matter, with less art.

9

II,2,1210

Came this from Hamlet to her?

10

II,2,1251

it may be, very like.

11

II,2,1263

So he does indeed.

12

II,2,1272

But look where sadly the poor wretch comes reading.

13

III,1,1693

Did he receive you well?

14

III,1,1698

Did you assay him
To any pastime?

15

III,1,1725

I shall obey you;
And for your part, Ophelia, I do wish...

16

III,2,1989

Come hither, my dear Hamlet, sit by me.

17

III,2,2125

The lady doth protest too much, methinks.

18

III,2,2154

How fares my lord?

19

III,4,2389

I'll warrant you; fear me not. Withdraw; I hear him coming.

20

III,4,2393

Hamlet, thou hast thy father much offended.

21

III,4,2395

Come, come, you answer with an idle tongue.

22

III,4,2397

Why, how now, Hamlet?

23

III,4,2399

Have you forgot me?

24

III,4,2403

Nay, then I'll set those to you that can speak.

25

III,4,2407

What wilt thou do? Thou wilt not murther me?
Help, help, ho!

26

III,4,2413

O me, what hast thou done?

27

III,4,2415

O, what a rash and bloody deed is this!

28

III,4,2418

As kill a king?

29

III,4,2429

What have I done that thou dar'st wag thy tongue
In noise so rude against me?

30

III,4,2443

Ah me, what act,
That roars so loud and thunders in the index?

31

III,4,2481

O Hamlet, speak no more!
Thou turn'st mine eyes into my very soul,...

32

III,4,2489

O, speak to me no more!
These words like daggers enter in mine ears....

33

III,4,2498

No more!

34

III,4,2503

Alas, he's mad!

35

III,4,2515

Alas, how is't with you,
That you do bend your eye on vacancy,...

36

III,4,2530

To whom do you speak this?

37

III,4,2532

Nothing at all; yet all that is I see.

38

III,4,2534

No, nothing but ourselves.

39

III,4,2539

This is the very coinage of your brain.
This bodiless creation ecstasy...

40

III,4,2559

O Hamlet, thou hast cleft my heart in twain.

41

III,4,2584

What shall I do?

42

III,4,2601

Be thou assur'd, if words be made of breath,
And breath of life, I have no life to breathe...

43

III,4,2605

Alack,
I had forgot! 'Tis so concluded on.

44

IV,1,2629

Bestow this place on us a little while.
[Exeunt Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.]...

45

IV,1,2633

Mad as the sea and wind when both contend
Which is the mightier. In his lawless fit...

46

IV,1,2651

To draw apart the body he hath kill'd;
O'er whom his very madness, like some ore...

47

IV,5,2857

I will not speak with her.

48

IV,5,2860

What would she have?

49

IV,5,2873

Let her come in.
[Exit Gentleman.]...

50

IV,5,2881

How now, Ophelia?

51

IV,5,2887

Alas, sweet lady, what imports this song?

52

IV,5,2894

Nay, but Ophelia-

53

IV,5,2898

Alas, look here, my lord!

54

IV,5,2958

Alack, what noise is this?

55

IV,5,2974

How cheerfully on the false trail they cry!
O, this is counter, you false Danish dogs!

56

IV,5,2985

Calmly, good Laertes.

57

IV,5,3000

But not by him!

58

IV,7,3312

One woe doth tread upon another's heel,
So fast they follow. Your sister's drown'd, Laertes.

59

IV,7,3315

There is a willow grows aslant a brook,
That shows his hoar leaves in the glassy stream....

60

IV,7,3334

Drown'd, drown'd.

61

V,1,3578

Sweets to the sweet! Farewell.
[Scatters flowers.]...

62

V,1,3606

Hamlet, Hamlet!

63

V,1,3612

O my son, what theme?

64

V,1,3617

For love of God, forbear him!

65

V,1,3629

This is mere madness;
And thus a while the fit will work on him....

66

V,2,3938

He's fat, and scant of breath.
Here, Hamlet, take my napkin, rub thy brows....

67

V,2,3943

I will, my lord; I pray you pardon me. Drinks.

68

V,2,3946

Come, let me wipe thy face.

69

V,2,3965

No, no! the drink, the drink! O my dear Hamlet!
The drink, the drink! I am poison'd. [Dies.]

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