Speeches (Lines) for Host
in "Merry Wives of Windsor"

Total: 46

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,307

What says my bully-rook? speak scholarly and wisely.

2

I,3,310

Discard, bully Hercules; cashier: let them wag; trot, trot.

3

I,3,312

Thou'rt an emperor, Caesar, Keisar, and Pheezar. I
will entertain Bardolph; he shall draw, he shall
tap: said I well, bully Hector?

4

I,3,316

I have spoke; let him follow.
[To BARDOLPH]
Let me see thee froth and lime: I am at a word; follow.

5

II,1,750

How now, bully-rook! thou'rt a gentleman.
Cavaleiro-justice, I say!

6

II,1,756

Tell him, cavaleiro-justice; tell him, bully-rook.

7

II,1,761

What sayest thou, my bully-rook?

8

II,1,768

Hast thou no suit against my knight, my
guest-cavaleire?

9

II,1,773

My hand, bully; thou shalt have egress and regress;
—said I well?—and thy name shall be Brook. It is
a merry knight. Will you go, An-heires?

10

II,1,784

Here, boys, here, here! shall we wag?

11

II,3,1117

Bless thee, bully doctor!

12

II,3,1122

To see thee fight, to see thee foin, to see thee
traverse; to see thee here, to see thee there; to
see thee pass thy punto, thy stock, thy reverse, thy
distance, thy montant. Is he dead, my Ethiopian? is
he dead, my Francisco? ha, bully! What says my
AEsculapius? my Galen? my heart of elder? ha! is
he dead, bully stale? is he dead?

13

II,3,1131

Thou art a Castalion-King-Urinal. Hector of Greece, my boy!

14

II,3,1151

Pardon, guest-justice. A word, Mounseur Mockwater.

15

II,3,1153

Mock-water, in our English tongue, is valour, bully.

16

II,3,1157

He will clapper-claw thee tightly, bully.

17

II,3,1159

That is, he will make thee amends.

18

II,3,1162

And I will provoke him to't, or let him wag.

19

II,3,1164

And, moreover, bully,—but first, master guest, and
Master Page, and eke Cavaleiro Slender, go you
through the town to Frogmore.

20

II,3,1169

He is there: see what humour he is in; and I will
bring the doctor about by the fields. Will it do well?

21

II,3,1176

Let him die: sheathe thy impatience, throw cold
water on thy choler: go about the fields with me
through Frogmore: I will bring thee where Mistress
Anne Page is, at a farm-house a-feasting; and thou
shalt woo her. Cried I aim? said I well?

22

II,3,1184

For the which I will be thy adversary toward Anne
Page. Said I well?

23

II,3,1187

Let us wag, then.

24

III,1,1265

Disarm them, and let them question: let them keep
their limbs whole and hack our English.

25

III,1,1284

Peace, I say, Gallia and Gaul, French and Welsh,
soul-curer and body-curer!

26

III,1,1287

Peace, I say! hear mine host of the Garter. Am I
politic? am I subtle? am I a Machiavel? Shall I
lose my doctor? no; he gives me the potions and the
motions. Shall I lose my parson, my priest, my Sir
Hugh? no; he gives me the proverbs and the
no-verbs. Give me thy hand, terrestrial; so. Give me
thy hand, celestial; so. Boys of art, I have
deceived you both; I have directed you to wrong
places: your hearts are mighty, your skins are
whole, and let burnt sack be the issue. Come, lay
their swords to pawn. Follow me, lads of peace;
follow, follow, follow.

27

III,2,1375

What say you to young Master Fenton? he capers, he
dances, he has eyes of youth, he writes verses, he
speaks holiday, he smells April and May: he will
carry't, he will carry't; 'tis in his buttons; he
will carry't.

28

III,2,1396

Farewell, my hearts: I will to my honest knight
Falstaff, and drink canary with him.

29

IV,3,2185

What duke should that be comes so secretly? I hear
not of him in the court. Let me speak with the
gentlemen: they speak English?

30

IV,3,2189

They shall have my horses; but I'll make them pay;
I'll sauce them: they have had my house a week at
command; I have turned away my other guests: they
must come off; I'll sauce them. Come.

31

IV,5,2295

What wouldst thou have, boor? what: thick-skin?
speak, breathe, discuss; brief, short, quick, snap.

32

IV,5,2299

There's his chamber, his house, his castle, his
standing-bed and truckle-bed; 'tis painted about
with the story of the Prodigal, fresh and new. Go
knock and call; hell speak like an Anthropophaginian
unto thee: knock, I say.

33

IV,5,2307

Ha! a fat woman! the knight may be robbed: I'll
call. Bully knight! bully Sir John! speak from
thy lungs military: art thou there? it is thine
host, thine Ephesian, calls.

34

IV,5,2312

Here's a Bohemian-Tartar tarries the coming down of
thy fat woman. Let her descend, bully, let her
descend; my chambers are honourable: fie! privacy?
fie!

35

IV,5,2335

Ay, come; quick.

36

IV,5,2337

Conceal them, or thou diest.

37

IV,5,2349

Thou art clerkly, thou art clerkly, Sir John. Was
there a wise woman with thee?

38

IV,5,2357

Where be my horses? speak well of them, varletto.

39

IV,5,2362

They are gone but to meet the duke, villain: do not
say they be fled; Germans are honest men.

40

IV,5,2366

What is the matter, sir?

41

IV,5,2377

Here, master doctor, in perplexity and doubtful dilemma.

42

IV,5,2383

Hue and cry, villain, go! Assist me, knight. I am
undone! Fly, run, hue and cry, villain! I am undone!

43

IV,6,2423

Master Fenton, talk not to me; my mind is heavy: I
will give over all.

44

IV,6,2428

I will hear you, Master Fenton; and I will at the
least keep your counsel.

45

IV,6,2467

Which means she to deceive, father or mother?

46

IV,6,2473

Well, husband your device; I'll to the vicar:
Bring you the maid, you shall not lack a priest.

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