Speeches (Lines) for Ford
in "Merry Wives of Windsor"

Total: 99

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,670

Well, I hope it be not so.

2

II,1,673

Why, sir, my wife is not young.

3

II,1,677

Love my wife!

4

II,1,681

What name, sir?

5

II,1,688

[Aside] I will be patient; I will find out this.

6

II,1,701

I will seek out Falstaff.

7

II,1,703

If I do find it: well.

8

II,1,706

'Twas a good sensible fellow: well.

9

II,1,711

I melancholy! I am not melancholy. Get you home, go.

10

II,1,727

You heard what this knave told me, did you not?

11

II,1,729

Do you think there is truth in them?

12

II,1,734

Were they his men?

13

II,1,736

I like it never the better for that. Does he lie at
the Garter?

14

II,1,742

I do not misdoubt my wife; but I would be loath to
turn them together. A man may be too confident: I...

15

II,1,759

Good mine host o' the Garter, a word with you.

16

II,1,770

None, I protest: but I'll give you a pottle of
burnt sack to give me recourse to him and tell him...

17

II,1,787

Though Page be a secure fool, an stands so firmly
on his wife's frailty, yet I cannot put off my...

18

II,2,949

Bless you, sir!

19

II,2,951

I make bold to press with so little preparation upon
you.

20

II,2,955

Sir, I am a gentleman that have spent much; my name is Brook.

21

II,2,957

Good Sir John, I sue for yours: not to charge you;
for I must let you understand I think myself in...

22

II,2,964

Troth, and I have a bag of money here troubles me:
if you will help to bear it, Sir John, take all, or...

23

II,2,968

I will tell you, sir, if you will give me the hearing.

24

II,2,971

Sir, I hear you are a scholar,—I will be brief
with you,—and you have been a man long known to me,...

25

II,2,982

There is a gentlewoman in this town; her husband's
name is Ford.

26

II,2,985

I have long loved her, and, I protest to you,
bestowed much on her; followed her with a doting...

27

II,2,1001

Never.

28

II,2,1003

Never.

29

II,2,1005

Like a fair house built on another man's ground; so
that I have lost my edifice by mistaking the place...

30

II,2,1009

When I have told you that, I have told you all.
Some say, that though she appear honest to me, yet in...

31

II,2,1019

Believe it, for you know it. There is money; spend
it, spend it; spend more; spend all I have; only...

32

II,2,1029

O, understand my drift. She dwells so securely on
the excellency of her honour, that the folly of my...

33

II,2,1042

O good sir!

34

II,2,1044

Want no money, Sir John; you shall want none.

35

II,2,1053

I am blest in your acquaintance. Do you know Ford,
sir?

36

II,2,1061

I would you knew Ford, sir, that you might avoid him
if you saw him.

37

II,2,1073

What a damned Epicurean rascal is this! My heart is
ready to crack with impatience. Who says this is...

38

III,2,1320

Well met, Mistress Page. Whither go you?

39

III,2,1322

Ay; and as idle as she may hang together, for want
of company. I think, if your husbands were dead,...

40

III,2,1326

Where had you this pretty weather-cock?

41

III,2,1331

Sir John Falstaff!

42

III,2,1335

Indeed she is.

43

III,2,1338

Has Page any brains? hath he any eyes? hath he any
thinking? Sure, they sleep; he hath no use of them....

44

III,2,1362

Trust me, a good knot: I have good cheer at home;
and I pray you all go with me.

45

III,2,1387

I beseech you heartily, some of you go home with me
to dinner: besides your cheer, you shall have...

46

III,2,1399

[Aside] I think I shall drink in pipe wine first
with him; I'll make him dance. Will you go, gentles?

47

III,3,1542

Pray you, come near: if I suspect without cause,
why then make sport at me; then let me be your jest;...

48

III,3,1548

Buck! I would I could wash myself of the buck!
Buck, buck, buck! Ay, buck; I warrant you, buck;...

49

III,3,1559

True, Master Page. Up, gentlemen: you shall see
sport anon: follow me, gentlemen.

50

III,3,1589

I cannot find him: may be the knave bragged of that
he could not compass.

51

III,3,1593

Ay, I do so.

52

III,3,1595

Amen!

53

III,3,1597

Ay, ay; I must bear it.

54

III,3,1606

'Tis my fault, Master Page: I suffer for it.

55

III,3,1611

Well, I promised you a dinner. Come, come, walk in
the Park: I pray you, pardon me; I will hereafter...

56

III,3,1620

Any thing.

57

III,3,1623

Pray you, go, Master Page.

58

III,5,1802

Bless you, sir!

59

III,5,1805

That, indeed, Sir John, is my business.

60

III,5,1808

And sped you, sir?

61

III,5,1810

How so, sir? Did she change her determination?

62

III,5,1819

What, while you were there?

63

III,5,1821

And did he search for you, and could not find you?

64

III,5,1826

A buck-basket!

65

III,5,1831

And how long lay you there?

66

III,5,1860

In good sadness, I am sorry that for my sake you
have sufferd all this. My suit then is desperate;...

67

III,5,1868

'Tis past eight already, sir.

68

III,5,1876

Hum! ha! is this a vision? is this a dream? do I
sleep? Master Ford awake! awake, Master Ford!...

69

IV,2,2008

Which way should be go? how should I bestow him?
Shall I put him into the basket again?

70

IV,2,2075

Ay, but if it prove true, Master Page, have you any
way then to unfool me again? Set down the basket,...

71

IV,2,2086

So say I too, sir.
[Re-enter MISTRESS FORD]...

72

IV,2,2094

Well said, brazen-face! hold it out. Come forth, sirrah!

73

IV,2,2098

I shall find you anon.

74

IV,2,2101

Empty the basket, I say!

75

IV,2,2103

Master Page, as I am a man, there was one conveyed
out of my house yesterday in this basket: why may...

76

IV,2,2114

Well, he's not here I seek for.

77

IV,2,2116

Help to search my house this one time. If I find
not what I seek, show no colour for my extremity; let...

78

IV,2,2124

Old woman! what old woman's that?

79

IV,2,2126

A witch, a quean, an old cozening quean! Have I not
forbid her my house? She comes of errands, does...

80

IV,2,2138

I'll prat her.
[Beating him]...

81

IV,2,2147

Hang her, witch!

82

IV,2,2151

Will you follow, gentlemen? I beseech you, follow;
see but the issue of my jealousy: if I cry out thus...

83

IV,4,2200

Pardon me, wife. Henceforth do what thou wilt;
I rather will suspect the sun with cold...

84

IV,4,2212

There is no better way than that they spoke of.

85

IV,4,2263

The children must
Be practised well to this, or they'll ne'er do't.

86

IV,4,2268

That will be excellent. I'll go and buy them vizards.

87

IV,4,2276

Nay I'll to him again in name of Brook
He'll tell me all his purpose: sure, he'll come.

88

V,1,2492

Went you not to her yesterday, sir, as you told me
you had appointed?

89

V,5,2684

Now, sir, who's a cuckold now? Master Brook,
Falstaff's a knave, a cuckoldly knave; here are his...

90

V,5,2695

Ay, and an ox too: both the proofs are extant.

91

V,5,2706

Well said, fairy Hugh.

92

V,5,2708

I will never mistrust my wife again till thou art
able to woo her in good English.

93

V,5,2724

What, a hodge-pudding? a bag of flax?

94

V,5,2727

And one that is as slanderous as Satan?

95

V,5,2729

And as wicked as his wife?

96

V,5,2737

Marry, sir, we'll bring you to Windsor, to one
Master Brook, that you have cozened of money, to...

97

V,5,2780

This is strange. Who hath got the right Anne?

98

V,5,2798

Stand not amazed; here is no remedy:
In love the heavens themselves do guide the state;...

99

V,5,2811

Let it be so. Sir John,
To Master Brook you yet shall hold your word...

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