Speeches (Lines) for Falstaff
in "Henry IV, Part II"

Total: 184

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,275

Sirrah, you giant, what says the doctor to my water?

2

I,2,281

Men of all sorts take a pride to gird at me. The
this foolish-compounded clay, man, is not able to invent...

3

I,2,323

Let him be damn'd, like the Glutton; pray God his
be hotter! A whoreson Achitophel! A rascal-yea-forsooth...

4

I,2,346

I bought him in Paul's, and he'll buy me a horse in
Smithfield. An I could get me but a wife in the stews, I were...

5

I,2,352

Wait close; I will not see him.

6

I,2,362

Boy, tell him I am deaf.

7

I,2,368

What! a young knave, and begging! Is there not wars?
there not employment? Doth not the King lack subjects? Do not...

8

I,2,378

Why, sir, did I say you were an honest man? Setting
knighthood and my soldiership aside, I had lied in my throat...

9

I,2,386

I give thee leave to tell me so! I lay aside that
grows to me! If thou get'st any leave of me, hang me; if thou...

10

I,2,393

My good lord! God give your lordship good time of
am glad to see your lordship abroad. I heard say your...

11

I,2,407

An't please your lordship, I hear his Majesty is
with some discomfort from Wales.

12

I,2,413

And I hear, moreover, his Highness is fall'n into
same whoreson apoplexy.

13

I,2,418

This apoplexy, as I take it, is a kind of lethargy,
please your lordship, a kind of sleeping in the blood, a...

14

I,2,424

It hath it original from much grief, from study, and
perturbation of the brain. I have read the cause of his...

15

I,2,430

Very well, my lord, very well. Rather an't please
is the disease of not listening, the malady of not marking,...

16

I,2,438

I am as poor as Job, my lord, but not so patient.
lordship may minister the potion of imprisonment to me in...

17

I,2,448

As I was then advis'd by my learned counsel in the
of this land-service, I did not come.

18

I,2,453

He that buckles himself in my belt cannot live in

19

I,2,457

I would it were otherwise; I would my means were
and my waist slenderer.

20

I,2,461

The young Prince hath misled me. I am the fellow with
great belly, and he my dog.

21

I,2,470

My lord—

22

I,2,473

To wake a wolf is as bad as smell a fox.

23

I,2,476

A wassail candle, my lord—all tallow; if I did say
wax, my growth would approve the truth.

24

I,2,482

His effect of gravy, gravy,

25

I,2,486

Not so, my lord. Your ill angel is light; but hope
that looks upon me will take me without weighing. And yet in...

26

I,2,516

My lord, I was born about three of the clock in the
afternoon, with a white head and something a round belly. For...

27

I,2,535

God send the companion a better prince! I cannot rid
hands of him.

28

I,2,542

Yea; I thank your pretty sweet wit for it. But look
pray, all you that kiss my Lady Peace at home, that our...

29

I,2,567

Will your lordship lend me a thousand pound to
forth?

30

I,2,575

If I do, fillip me with a three-man beetle. A man can
more separate age and covetousness than 'a can part young...

31

I,2,583

What money is in my purse?

32

I,2,585

I can get no remedy against this consumption of the
purse; borrowing only lingers and lingers it out, but the...

33

II,1,765

How now! whose mare's dead? What's the matter?

34

II,1,767

Away, varlets! Draw, Bardolph. Cut me off the
head. Throw the quean in the channel.

35

II,1,778

Keep them off, Bardolph.

36

II,1,804

I think I am as like to ride the mare, if I have any
vantage of ground to get up.

37

II,1,811

What is the gross sum that I owe thee?

38

II,1,839

My lord, this is a poor mad soul, and she says up and
down the town that her eldest son is like you. She hath been...

39

II,1,862

My lord, I will not undergo this sneap without reply.
call honourable boldness impudent sauciness; if a man will...

40

II,1,874

Come hither, hostess.

41

II,1,879

As I am a gentleman!

42

II,1,881

As I am a gentleman! Come, no more words of it.

43

II,1,885

Glasses, glasses, is the only drinking; and for thy
walls, a pretty slight drollery, or the story of the...

44

II,1,900

Let it alone; I'll make other shift. You'll be a fool
still.

45

II,1,904

Will I live? [To BARDOLPH] Go, with her, with her;
on, hook on.

46

II,1,908

No more words; let's have her.

47

II,1,911

What's the news, my lord?

48

II,1,914

I hope, my lord, all's well. What is the news, my

49

II,1,920

Comes the King back from Wales, my noble lord?

50

II,1,923

My lord!

51

II,1,925

Master Gower, shall I entreat you with me to dinner?

52

II,1,932

Will you sup with me, Master Gower?

53

II,1,936

Master Gower, if they become me not, he was a fool
taught them me. This is the right fencing grace, my lord; tap...

54

II,4,1271

[Singing] 'When Arthur first in court'—Empty the
Jordan. [Exit FRANCIS][Singing] 'And was a worthy king'—...

55

II,4,1276

So is all her sect; and they be once in a calm, they
sick.

56

II,4,1282

You make fat rascals, Mistress Doll.

57

II,4,1285

If the cook help to make the gluttony, you help to
the diseases, Doll. We catch of you, Doll, we catch of you;...

58

II,4,1291

'Your brooches, pearls, and ouches.' For to serve
is to come halting off; you know, to come off the breach with...

59

II,4,1329

Dost thou hear, hostess?

60

II,4,1332

Dost thou hear? It is mine ancient.

61

II,4,1352

He's no swagg'rer, hostess; a tame cheater, i' faith;
may stroke him as gently as a puppy greyhound. He'll not...

62

II,4,1372

Welcome, Ancient Pistol. Here, Pistol, I charge you
a cup of sack; do you discharge upon mine hostess.

63

II,4,1376

She is pistol-proof, sir; you shall not hardly offend
her.

64

II,4,1395

No more, Pistol; I would not have you go off here.
Discharge yourself of our company, Pistol.

65

II,4,1412

Hark thee hither, Mistress Doll.

66

II,4,1450

Pistol, I would be quiet.

67

II,4,1458

Quoit him down, Bardolph, like a shove-groat
Nay, an 'a do nothing but speak nothing, 'a shall be nothing...

68

II,4,1469

Give me my rapier, boy.

69

II,4,1471

Get you down stairs.

70

II,4,1486

Have you turn'd him out a doors?

71

II,4,1490

A rascal! to brave me!

72

II,4,1497

A rascally slave! I will toss the rogue in a blanket.

73

II,4,1503

Let them play. Play, sirs. Sit on my knee, Don. A
bragging slave! The rogue fled from me like quick-silver.

74

II,4,1513

Peace, good Doll! Do not speak like a death's-head;
not bid me remember mine end.

75

II,4,1517

A good shallow young fellow. 'A would have made a
pantler; 'a would ha' chipp'd bread well.

76

II,4,1521

He a good wit! hang him, baboon! His wit's as thick
Tewksbury mustard; there's no more conceit in him than is in...

77

II,4,1527

Because their legs are both of a bigness, and 'a
quoits well, and eats conger and fennel, and drinks off...

78

II,4,1552

Kiss me, Doll.

79

II,4,1560

Thou dost give me flattering busses.

80

II,4,1562

I am old, I am old.

81

II,4,1565

What stuff wilt have a kirtle of? I shall receive
Thursday. Shalt have a cap to-morrow. A merry song, come. 'A...

82

II,4,1573

Some sack, Francis.

83

II,4,1575

Ha! a bastard son of the King's? And art thou not
his brother?

84

II,4,1581

A better than thou. I am a gentleman: thou art a

85

II,4,1587

Thou whoreson mad compound of majesty, by this light
flesh and corrupt blood, thou art welcome.

86

II,4,1600

Didst thou hear me?

87

II,4,1605

No, no, no; not so; I did not think thou wast within
hearing.

88

II,4,1609

No abuse, Hal, o' mine honour; no abuse.

89

II,4,1612

No abuse, Hal.

90

II,4,1614

No abuse, Ned, i' th' world; honest Ned, none. I
disprais'd him before the wicked—that the wicked might not...

91

II,4,1633

The fiend hath prick'd down Bardolph irrecoverable;
his face is Lucifer's privy-kitchen, where he doth nothing...

92

II,4,1641

For one of them—she's in hell already, and burns
souls. For th' other—I owe her money; and whether she be...

93

II,4,1647

No, I think thou art not; I think thou art quit for
Marry, there is another indictment upon thee for suffering...

94

II,4,1659

His Grace says that which his flesh rebels against.

95

II,4,1678

Now comes in the sweetest morsel of the night, and we
must hence, and leave it unpick'd. [Knocking within] More...

96

II,4,1685

[To the PAGE]. Pay the musicians, sirrah.—Farewell,
hostess; farewell, Doll. You see, my good wenches, how men of...

97

II,4,1693

Farewell, farewell.

98

III,2,1930

I am glad to see you well, good Master Robert
Master Surecard, as I think?

99

III,2,1934

Good Master Silence, it well befits you should be of
peace.

100

III,2,1938

Fie! this is hot weather. Gentlemen, have you
here half a dozen sufficient men?

101

III,2,1942

Let me see them, I beseech you.

102

III,2,1952

Is thy name Mouldy?

103

III,2,1954

'Tis the more time thou wert us'd.

104

III,2,1958

Prick him.

105

III,2,1965

Go to; peace, Mouldy; you shall go. Mouldy, it is
you were spent.

106

III,2,1972

Yea, marry, let me have him to sit under. He's like
a cold soldier.

107

III,2,1977

Shadow, whose son art thou?

108

III,2,1979

Thy mother's son! Like enough; and thy father's
So the son of the female is the shadow of the male. It is...

109

III,2,1985

Shadow will serve for summer. Prick him; for we have
number of shadows fill up the muster-book.

110

III,2,1989

Where's he?

111

III,2,1991

Is thy name Wart?

112

III,2,1993

Thou art a very ragged wart.

113

III,2,1995

It were superfluous; for his apparel is built upon
back, and the whole frame stands upon pins. Prick him no

114

III,2,2003

What trade art thou, Feeble?

115

III,2,2006

You may; but if he had been a man's tailor, he'd ha'
prick'd you. Wilt thou make as many holes in an enemy's...

116

III,2,2011

Well said, good woman's tailor! well said, courageous
Feeble! Thou wilt be as valiant as the wrathful dove or most...

117

III,2,2016

I would thou wert a man's tailor, that thou mightst
him and make him fit to go. I cannot put him to a private...

118

III,2,2022

I am bound to thee, reverend Feeble. Who is next?

119

III,2,2024

Yea, marry, let's see Bullcalf.

120

III,2,2026

Fore God, a likely fellow! Come, prick me Bullcalf
he roar again.

121

III,2,2030

What, dost thou roar before thou art prick'd?

122

III,2,2032

What disease hast thou?

123

III,2,2036

Come, thou shalt go to the wars in a gown. We will
away thy cold; and I will take such order that thy friends...

124

III,2,2045

Come, I will go drink with you, but I cannot tarry
dinner. I am glad to see you, by my troth, Master Shallow.

125

III,2,2050

No more of that, Master Shallow, no more of that.

126

III,2,2052

She lives, Master Shallow.

127

III,2,2054

Never, never; she would always say she could not
Master Shallow.

128

III,2,2060

Old, old, Master Shallow.

129

III,2,2068

We have heard the chimes at midnight, Master Shallow.

130

III,2,2104

Come, sir, which men shall I have?

131

III,2,2109

Go to; well.

132

III,2,2111

Do you choose for me.

133

III,2,2113

Mouldy and Bullcalf: for you, Mouldy, stay at home
you are past service; and for your part, Bullcalf, grow you...

134

III,2,2121

Will you tell me, Master Shallow, how to choose a
Care I for the limb, the thews, the stature, bulk, and big...

135

III,2,2141

Come, manage me your caliver. So—very well. Go to;
good; exceeding good. O, give me always a little, lean, old,...

136

III,2,2158

These fellows will do well. Master Shallow, God keep
Master Silence, I will not use many words with you: Fare you...

137

III,2,2170

Fore God, would you would.

138

III,2,2172

Fare you well, gentle gentlemen. [Exeunt JUSTICES] On,
Bardolph; lead the men away. [Exeunt all but FALSTAFF] As I...

139

IV,3,2579

What's your name, sir? Of what condition are you, and
what place, I pray?

140

IV,3,2584

Well then, Colville is your name, a knight is your
degree, and your place the Dale. Colville shall still be your...

141

IV,3,2590

As good a man as he, sir, whoe'er I am. Do you yield,
sir, or shall I sweat for you? If I do sweat, they are the...

142

IV,3,2599

I have a whole school of tongues in this belly of
and not a tongue of them all speaks any other word but my...

143

IV,3,2615

I would be sorry, my lord, but it should be thus: I
knew yet but rebuke and check was the reward of valour. Do...

144

IV,3,2633

I know not. Here he is, and here I yield him; and I
beseech your Grace, let it be book'd with the rest of this...

145

IV,3,2649

Let it shine, then.

146

IV,3,2651

Let it do something, my good lord, that may do me
and call it what you will.

147

IV,3,2657

And a famous true subject took him.

148

IV,3,2661

I know not how they sold themselves; but thou, like a
kind fellow, gavest thyself away gratis; and I thank thee for...

149

IV,3,2676

My lord, I beseech you, give me leave to go through
Gloucestershire; and, when you come to court, stand my good...

150

IV,3,2683

I would you had but the wit; 'twere better than your
dukedom. Good faith, this same young sober-blooded boy doth...

151

IV,3,2739

Let them go. I'll through Gloucestershire, and there
I visit Master Robert Shallow, Esquire. I have him already...

152

V,1,3142

You must excuse me, Master Robert Shallow.

153

V,1,3205

I'll follow you, good Master Robert Shallow.
[Exit SHALLOW] Bardolph, look to our horses. [Exeunt...

154

V,1,3242

I come, Master Shallow; I come, Master Shallow.

155

V,3,3400

Fore God, you have here a goodly dwelling and rich.

156

V,3,3405

This Davy serves you for good uses; he is your
serving-man and your husband.

157

V,3,3418

There's a merry heart! Good Master Silence, I'll give
a health for that anon.

158

V,3,3437

I did not think Master Silence had been a man of this
mettle.

159

V,3,3449

Well said, Master Silence.

160

V,3,3452

Health and long life to you, Master Silence!

161

V,3,3477

[To SILENCE, who has drunk a bumper] Why, now you
done me right.

162

V,3,3485

'Tis so.

163

V,3,3491

From the court? Let him come in.
[Enter PISTOL]...

164

V,3,3495

What wind blew you hither, Pistol?

165

V,3,3506

I pray thee now, deliver them like a man of this

166

V,3,3510

O base Assyrian knight, what is thy news?
Let King Cophetua know the truth thereof.

167

V,3,3532

What, is the old king dead?

168

V,3,3534

Away, Bardolph! saddle my horse. Master Robert
choose what office thou wilt in the land, 'tis thine. Pistol,...

169

V,3,3542

Carry Master Silence to bed. Master Shallow, my Lord
Shallow, be what thou wilt—I am Fortune's steward. Get on...

170

V,5,3593

Stand here by me, Master Robert Shallow; I will make the
King do you grace. I will leer upon him, as 'a comes by; and do...

171

V,5,3597

Come here, Pistol; stand behind me. [To SHALLOW] O, if
I had had to have made new liveries, I would have bestowed the...

172

V,5,3602

It shows my earnestness of affection-

173

V,5,3604

My devotion—

174

V,5,3606

As it were, to ride day and night; and not to
not to remember, not to have patience to shift me—

175

V,5,3610

But to stand stained with travel, and sweating with
desire to see him; thinking of nothing else, putting all...

176

V,5,3628

I will deliver her.

177

V,5,3632

God save thy Grace, King Hal; my royal Hal!

178

V,5,3635

God save thee, my sweet boy!

179

V,5,3639

My king! my Jove! I speak to thee, my heart!

180

V,5,3666

Master Shallow, I owe you a thousand pounds.

181

V,5,3670

That can hardly be, Master Shallow. Do not you grieve
this; I shall be sent for in private to him. Look you, he...

182

V,5,3682

Sir, I will be as good as my word. This that you
was but a colour.

183

V,5,3686

Fear no colours; go with me to dinner. Come,
Pistol; come, Bardolph. I shall be sent for soon at night.

184

V,5,3692

My lord, my lord—

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