Speeches (Lines) for Falstaff
in "Henry IV, Part I"

Total: 151

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,112

Now, Hal, what time of day is it, lad?

2

I,2,124

Indeed, you come near me now, Hal; for we that take
purses go by the moon and the seven stars, and not...

3

I,2,131

No, by my troth, not so much as will serve to
prologue to an egg and butter.

4

I,2,134

Marry, then, sweet wag, when thou art king, let not
us that are squires of the night's body be called...

5

I,2,150

By the Lord, thou sayest true, lad. And is not my
hostess of the tavern a most sweet wench?

6

I,2,154

How now, how now, mad wag! what, in thy quips and
thy quiddities? what a plague have I to do with a...

7

I,2,158

Well, thou hast called her to a reckoning many a
time and oft.

8

I,2,161

No; I'll give thee thy due, thou hast paid all there.

9

I,2,164

Yea, and so used it that were it not here apparent
that thou art heir apparent—But, I prithee, sweet...

10

I,2,171

Shall I? O rare! By the Lord, I'll be a brave judge.

11

I,2,174

Well, Hal, well; and in some sort it jumps with my
humour as well as waiting in the court, I can tell...

12

I,2,178

Yea, for obtaining of suits, whereof the hangman
hath no lean wardrobe. 'Sblood, I am as melancholy...

13

I,2,182

Yea, or the drone of a Lincolnshire bagpipe.

14

I,2,185

Thou hast the most unsavoury similes and art indeed
the most comparative, rascalliest, sweet young...

15

I,2,196

O, thou hast damnable iteration and art indeed able
to corrupt a saint. Thou hast done much harm upon...

16

I,2,206

'Zounds, where thou wilt, lad; I'll make one; an I
do not, call me villain and baffle me.

17

I,2,210

Why, Hal, 'tis my vocation, Hal; 'tis no sin for a
man to labour in his vocation....

18

I,2,239

Hear ye, Yedward; if I tarry at home and go not,
I'll hang you for going.

19

I,2,242

Hal, wilt thou make one?

20

I,2,244

There's neither honesty, manhood, nor good
fellowship in thee, nor thou camest not of the blood...

21

I,2,248

Why, that's well said.

22

I,2,250

By the Lord, I'll be a traitor then, when thou art king.

23

I,2,255

Well, God give thee the spirit of persuasion and him
the ears of profiting, that what thou speakest may...

24

II,2,745

Poins! Poins, and be hanged! Poins!

25

II,2,748

Where's Poins, Hal?

26

II,2,750

I am accursed to rob in that thief's company: the
rascal hath removed my horse, and tied him I know...

27

II,2,775

Have you any levers to lift me up again, being down?
'Sblood, I'll not bear mine own flesh so far afoot...

28

II,2,780

I prithee, good Prince Hal, help me to my horse,
good king's son.

29

II,2,783

Go, hang thyself in thine own heir-apparent
garters! If I be ta'en, I'll peach for this. An I...

30

II,2,790

So I do, against my will.

31

II,2,796

You lie, ye rogue; 'tis going to the king's tavern.

32

II,2,798

To be hanged.

33

II,2,804

'Zounds, will they not rob us?

34

II,2,806

Indeed, I am not John of Gaunt, your grandfather;
but yet no coward, Hal.

35

II,2,812

Now cannot I strike him, if I should be hanged.

36

II,2,816

Now, my masters, happy man be his dole, say I:
every man to his business.

37

II,2,823

Strike; down with them; cut the villains' throats:
ah! whoreson caterpillars! bacon-fed knaves! they...

38

II,2,827

Hang ye, gorbellied knaves, are ye undone? No, ye
fat chuffs: I would your store were here! On,...

39

II,2,839

Come, my masters, let us share, and then to horse
before day. An the Prince and Poins be not two...

40

II,4,1105

A plague of all cowards, I say, and a vengeance too!
marry, and amen! Give me a cup of sack, boy. Ere I...

41

II,4,1114

You rogue, here's lime in this sack too: there is
nothing but roguery to be found in villanous man:...

42

II,4,1126

A king's son! If I do not beat thee out of thy
kingdom with a dagger of lath, and drive all thy...

43

II,4,1131

Are not you a coward? answer me to that: and Poins there?

44

II,4,1134

I call thee coward! I'll see thee damned ere I call
thee coward: but I would give a thousand pound I...

45

II,4,1144

All's one for that.
[He drinks]...

46

II,4,1148

What's the matter! there be four of us here have
ta'en a thousand pound this day morning.

47

II,4,1151

Where is it! taken from us it is: a hundred upon
poor four of us.

48

II,4,1154

I am a rogue, if I were not at half-sword with a
dozen of them two hours together. I have 'scaped by...

49

II,4,1165

Sixteen at least, my lord.

50

II,4,1168

You rogue, they were bound, every man of them; or I
am a Jew else, an Ebrew Jew.

51

II,4,1171

And unbound the rest, and then come in the other.

52

II,4,1173

All! I know not what you call all; but if I fought
not with fifty of them, I am a bunch of radish: if...

53

II,4,1178

Nay, that's past praying for: I have peppered two
of them; two I am sure I have paid, two rogues...

54

II,4,1185

Four, Hal; I told thee four.

55

II,4,1187

These four came all a-front, and mainly thrust at
me. I made me no more ado but took all their seven...

56

II,4,1191

In buckram?

57

II,4,1193

Seven, by these hilts, or I am a villain else.

58

II,4,1195

Dost thou hear me, Hal?

59

II,4,1197

Do so, for it is worth the listening to. These nine
in buckram that I told thee of—

60

II,4,1200

Their points being broken,—

61

II,4,1202

Began to give me ground: but I followed me close,
came in foot and hand; and with a thought seven of...

62

II,4,1206

But, as the devil would have it, three misbegotten
knaves in Kendal green came at my back and let drive...

63

II,4,1214

What, art thou mad? art thou mad? is not the truth
the truth?

64

II,4,1220

What, upon compulsion? 'Zounds, an I were at the
strappado, or all the racks in the world, I would...

65

II,4,1229

'Sblood, you starveling, you elf-skin, you dried
neat's tongue, you bull's pizzle, you stock-fish! O...

66

II,4,1252

By the Lord, I knew ye as well as he that made ye.
Why, hear you, my masters: was it for me to kill the...

67

II,4,1267

Ah, no more of that, Hal, an thou lovest me!

68

II,4,1277

What manner of man is he?

69

II,4,1279

What doth gravity out of his bed at midnight? Shall
I give him his answer?

70

II,4,1282

'Faith, and I'll send him packing.

71

II,4,1315

My own knee! when I was about thy years, Hal, I was
not an eagle's talon in the waist; I could have...

72

II,4,1327

Owen, Owen, the same; and his son-in-law Mortimer,
and old Northumberland, and that sprightly Scot of...

73

II,4,1333

You have hit it.

74

II,4,1335

Well, that rascal hath good mettle in him; he will not run.

75

II,4,1338

O' horseback, ye cuckoo; but afoot he will not budge a foot.

76

II,4,1340

I grant ye, upon instinct. Well, he is there too,
and one Mordake, and a thousand blue-caps more:...

77

II,4,1348

By the mass, lad, thou sayest true; it is like we
shall have good trading that way. But tell me, Hal,...

78

II,4,1357

Well, thou wert be horribly chid tomorrow when thou
comest to thy father: if thou love me, practise an answer.

79

II,4,1361

Shall I? content: this chair shall be my state,
this dagger my sceptre, and this cushion my crown.

80

II,4,1366

Well, an the fire of grace be not quite out of thee,
now shalt thou be moved. Give me a cup of sack to...

81

II,4,1372

And here is my speech. Stand aside, nobility.

82

II,4,1374

Weep not, sweet queen; for trickling tears are vain.

83

II,4,1376

For God's sake, lords, convey my tristful queen;
For tears do stop the flood-gates of her eyes.

84

II,4,1380

Peace, good pint-pot; peace, good tickle-brain.
Harry, I do not only marvel where thou spendest thy...

85

II,4,1404

A goodly portly man, i' faith, and a corpulent; of a
cheerful look, a pleasing eye and a most noble...

86

II,4,1418

Depose me? if thou dost it half so gravely, so
majestically, both in word and matter, hang me up by...

87

II,4,1422

And here I stand: judge, my masters.

88

II,4,1424

My noble lord, from Eastcheap.

89

II,4,1426

'Sblood, my lord, they are false: nay, I'll tickle
ye for a young prince, i' faith.

90

II,4,1443

I would your grace would take me with you: whom
means your grace?

91

II,4,1447

My lord, the man I know.

92

II,4,1449

But to say I know more harm in him than in myself,
were to say more than I know. That he is old, the...

93

II,4,1470

Out, ye rogue! Play out the play: I have much to
say in the behalf of that Falstaff.

94

II,4,1478

Dost thou hear, Hal? never call a true piece of
gold a counterfeit: thou art essentially mad,...

95

II,4,1482

I deny your major: if you will deny the sheriff,
so; if not, let him enter: if I become not a cart...

96

II,4,1489

Both which I have had: but their date is out, and
therefore I'll hide me.

97

III,3,2008

Bardolph, am I not fallen away vilely since this last
action? do I not bate? do I not dwindle? Why my...

98

III,3,2020

Why, there is it: come sing me a bawdy song; make
me merry. I was as virtuously given as a gentleman...

99

III,3,2031

Do thou amend thy face, and I'll amend my life:
thou art our admiral, thou bearest the lantern in...

100

III,3,2036

No, I'll be sworn; I make as good use of it as many
a man doth of a Death's-head or a memento mori: I...

101

III,3,2059

God-a-mercy! so should I be sure to be heart-burned.
[Enter Hostess]...

102

III,3,2068

Ye lie, hostess: Bardolph was shaved and lost many
a hair; and I'll be sworn my pocket was picked. Go...

103

III,3,2073

Go to, I know you well enough.

104

III,3,2078

Dowlas, filthy dowlas: I have given them away to
bakers' wives, and they have made bolters of them.

105

III,3,2084

He had his part of it; let him pay.

106

III,3,2086

How! poor? look upon his face; what call you rich?
let them coin his nose, let them coin his cheeks:...

107

III,3,2094

How! the prince is a Jack, a sneak-cup: 'sblood, an
he were here, I would cudgel him like a dog, if he...

108

III,3,2106

Prithee, let her alone, and list to me.

109

III,3,2108

The other night I fell asleep here behind the arras
and had my pocket picked: this house is turned...

110

III,3,2112

Wilt thou believe me, Hal? three or four bonds of
forty pound apiece, and a seal-ring of my...

111

III,3,2122

There's no more faith in thee than in a stewed
prune; nor no more truth in thee than in a drawn...

112

III,3,2128

What thing! why, a thing to thank God on.

113

III,3,2133

Setting thy womanhood aside, thou art a beast to say
otherwise.

114

III,3,2136

What beast! why, an otter.

115

III,3,2138

Why, she's neither fish nor flesh; a man knows not
where to have her.

116

III,3,2146

A thousand pound, Ha! a million: thy love is worth
a million: thou owest me thy love.

117

III,3,2150

Did I, Bardolph?

118

III,3,2152

Yea, if he said my ring was copper.

119

III,3,2154

Why, Hal, thou knowest, as thou art but man, I dare:
but as thou art prince, I fear thee as I fear the...

120

III,3,2158

The king is to be feared as the lion: dost thou
think I'll fear thee as I fear thy father? nay, an...

121

III,3,2173

Dost thou hear, Hal? thou knowest in the state of
innocency Adam fell; and what should poor Jack...

122

III,3,2179

Hostess, I forgive thee: go, make ready breakfast;
love thy husband, look to thy servants, cherish thy...

123

III,3,2189

O, I do not like that paying back; 'tis a double labour.

124

III,3,2191

Rob me the exchequer the first thing thou doest, and
do it with unwashed hands too.

125

III,3,2195

I would it had been of horse. Where shall I find
one that can steal well? O for a fine thief, of the...

126

III,3,2216

Rare words! brave world! Hostess, my breakfast, come!
O, I could wish this tavern were my drum!

127

IV,2,2367

Bardolph, get thee before to Coventry; fill me a
bottle of sack: our soldiers shall march through;...

128

IV,2,2371

Lay out, lay out.

129

IV,2,2373

An if it do, take it for thy labour; and if it make
twenty, take them all; I'll answer the coinage. Bid...

130

IV,2,2378

If I be not ashamed of my soldiers, I am a soused
gurnet. I have misused the king's press damnably....

131

IV,2,2419

What, Hal! how now, mad wag! what a devil dost thou
in Warwickshire? My good Lord of Westmoreland, I...

132

IV,2,2427

Tut, never fear me: I am as vigilant as a cat to
steal cream.

133

IV,2,2432

Mine, Hal, mine.

134

IV,2,2434

Tut, tut; good enough to toss; food for powder, food
for powder; they'll fill a pit as well as better:...

135

IV,2,2439

'Faith, for their poverty, I know not where they had
that; and for their bareness, I am sure they never...

136

IV,2,2445

What, is the king encamped?

137

IV,2,2447

Well,
To the latter end of a fray and the beginning of a feast...

138

V,1,2651

Rebellion lay in his way, and he found it.

139

V,1,2746

Hal, if thou see me down in the battle and bestride
me, so; 'tis a point of friendship.

140

V,1,2750

I would 'twere bed-time, Hal, and all well.

141

V,1,2753

'Tis not due yet; I would be loath to pay him before
his day. What need I be so forward with him that...

142

V,3,2914

Though I could 'scape shot-free at London, I fear
the shot here; here's no scoring but upon the pate....

143

V,3,2930

O Hal, I prithee, give me leave to breathe awhile.
Turk Gregory never did such deeds in arms as I have...

144

V,3,2935

Nay, before God, Hal, if Percy be alive, thou get'st
not my sword; but take my pistol, if thou wilt.

145

V,3,2938

Ay, Hal; 'tis hot, 'tis hot; there's that will sack a city.

146

V,3,2942

Well, if Percy be alive, I'll pierce him. If he do
come in my way, so: if he do not, if I come in his...

147

V,4,3035

Well said, Hal! to it Hal! Nay, you shall find no
boy's play here, I can tell you....

148

V,4,3077

[Rising up] Embowelled! if thou embowel me to-day,
I'll give you leave to powder me and eat me too...

149

V,4,3110

No, that's certain; I am not a double man: but if I
be not Jack Falstaff, then am I a Jack. There is Percy:...

150

V,4,3117

Didst thou? Lord, Lord, how this world is given to
lying! I grant you I was down and out of breath;...

151

V,4,3136

I'll follow, as they say, for reward. He that
rewards me, God reward him! If I do grow great,...

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