Speeches (Lines) for Prince Escalus
in "Romeo and Juliet"

Total: 16

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,101

Rebellious subjects, enemies to peace,
Profaners of this neighbour-stained steel,—
Will they not hear? What, ho! you men, you beasts,
That quench the fire of your pernicious rage
With purple fountains issuing from your veins,
On pain of torture, from those bloody hands
Throw your mistemper'd weapons to the ground,
And hear the sentence of your moved prince.
Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word,
By thee, old Capulet, and Montague,
Have thrice disturb'd the quiet of our streets,
And made Verona's ancient citizens
Cast by their grave beseeming ornaments,
To wield old partisans, in hands as old,
Canker'd with peace, to part your canker'd hate:
If ever you disturb our streets again,
Your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace.
For this time, all the rest depart away:
You Capulet; shall go along with me:
And, Montague, come you this afternoon,
To know our further pleasure in this case,
To old Free-town, our common judgment-place.
Once more, on pain of death, all men depart.

2

III,1,1658

Where are the vile beginners of this fray?

3

III,1,1668

Benvolio, who began this bloody fray?

4

III,1,1700

Romeo slew him, he slew Mercutio;
Who now the price of his dear blood doth owe?

5

III,1,1705

And for that offence
Immediately we do exile him hence:
I have an interest in your hate's proceeding,
My blood for your rude brawls doth lie a-bleeding;
But I'll amerce you with so strong a fine
That you shall all repent the loss of mine:
I will be deaf to pleading and excuses;
Nor tears nor prayers shall purchase out abuses:
Therefore use none: let Romeo hence in haste,
Else, when he's found, that hour is his last.
Bear hence this body and attend our will:
Mercy but murders, pardoning those that kill.

6

V,3,3160

What misadventure is so early up,
That calls our person from our morning's rest?

7

V,3,3167

What fear is this which startles in our ears?

8

V,3,3171

Search, seek, and know how this foul murder comes.

9

V,3,3182

Come, Montague; for thou art early up,
To see thy son and heir more early down.

10

V,3,3187

Look, and thou shalt see.

11

V,3,3190

Seal up the mouth of outrage for a while,
Till we can clear these ambiguities,
And know their spring, their head, their
true descent;
And then will I be general of your woes,
And lead you even to death: meantime forbear,
And let mischance be slave to patience.
Bring forth the parties of suspicion.

12

V,3,3203

Then say at once what thou dost know in this.

13

V,3,3245

We still have known thee for a holy man.
Where's Romeo's man? what can he say in this?

14

V,3,3253

Give me the letter; I will look on it.
Where is the county's page, that raised the watch?
Sirrah, what made your master in this place?

15

V,3,3261

This letter doth make good the friar's words,
Their course of love, the tidings of her death:
And here he writes that he did buy a poison
Of a poor 'pothecary, and therewithal
Came to this vault to die, and lie with Juliet.
Where be these enemies? Capulet! Montague!
See, what a scourge is laid upon your hate,
That heaven finds means to kill your joys with love.
And I for winking at your discords too
Have lost a brace of kinsmen: all are punish'd.

16

V,3,3281

A glooming peace this morning with it brings;
The sun, for sorrow, will not show his head:
Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things;
Some shall be pardon'd, and some punished:
For never was a story of more woe
Than this of Juliet and her Romeo.

Return to the "Romeo and Juliet" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS