Speeches (Lines) for Edgar
in "King Lear"

Total: 98

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,460

How now, brother Edmund? What serious contemplation are you
in?

2

I,2,464

Do you busy yourself with that?

3

I,2,471

How long have you been a sectary astronomical?

4

I,2,473

The night gone by.

5

I,2,475

Ay, two hours together.

6

I,2,478

None at all.

7

I,2,484

Some villain hath done me wrong.

8

I,2,490

Arm'd, brother?

9

I,2,495

Shall I hear from you anon?

10

II,1,954

I am sure on't, not a word.

11

II,3,1252

I heard myself proclaim'd,
And by the happy hollow of a tree...

12

III,4,1840

[within] Fathom and half, fathom and half! Poor Tom!

13

III,4,1848

Away! the foul fiend follows me! Through the sharp hawthorn
blows the cold wind. Humh! go to thy cold bed, and warm thee.

14

III,4,1852

Who gives anything to poor Tom? whom the foul fiend hath led
through fire and through flame, through ford and whirlpool, o'er...

15

III,4,1875

Pillicock sat on Pillicock's Hill. 'Allow, 'allow, loo, loo!

16

III,4,1877

Take heed o' th' foul fiend; obey thy parents: keep thy word
justly; swear not; commit not with man's sworn spouse; set not...

17

III,4,1881

A servingman, proud in heart and mind; that curl'd my hair,
wore gloves in my cap; serv'd the lust of my mistress' heart and...

18

III,4,1910

This is the foul fiend Flibbertigibbet. He begins at curfew,
and walks till the first cock. He gives the web and the pin,...

19

III,4,1923

Poor Tom, that eats the swimming frog, the toad, the todpole,
the wall-newt and the water; that in the fury of his heart, when...

20

III,4,1935

The prince of darkness is a gentleman!
Modo he's call'd, and Mahu.

21

III,4,1939

Poor Tom 's acold.

22

III,4,1951

How to prevent the fiend and to kill vermin.

23

III,4,1967

Tom's acold.

24

III,4,1978

Child Rowland to the dark tower came;
His word was still...

25

III,6,2013

Frateretto calls me, and tells me Nero is an angler in the
lake of darkness. Pray, innocent, and beware the foul fiend.

26

III,6,2022

The foul fiend bites my back.

27

III,6,2028

Look, where he stands and glares! Want'st thou eyes at trial,
madam?...

28

III,6,2034

The foul fiend haunts poor Tom in the voice of a nightingale.
Hoppedance cries in Tom's belly for two white herring. Croak...

29

III,6,2044

Let us deal justly.
Sleepest or wakest thou, jolly shepherd?...

30

III,6,2059

Bless thy five wits!

31

III,6,2062

[aside] My tears begin to take his part so much
They'll mar my counterfeiting.

32

III,6,2066

Tom will throw his head at them. Avaunt, you curs!
Be thy mouth or black or white,...

33

III,6,2106

When we our betters see bearing our woes,
We scarcely think our miseries our foes....

34

IV,1,2247

Yet better thus, and known to be contemn'd,
Than still contemn'd and flatter'd. To be worst,...

35

IV,1,2276

[aside] O gods! Who is't can say 'I am at the worst'?
I am worse than e'er I was.

36

IV,1,2279

[aside] And worse I may be yet. The worst is not
So long as we can say 'This is the worst.'

37

IV,1,2291

[aside] How should this be?
Bad is the trade that must play fool to sorrow,...

38

IV,1,2308

Poor Tom's acold. [Aside] I cannot daub it further.

39

IV,1,2310

[aside] And yet I must.- Bless thy sweet eyes, they bleed.

40

IV,1,2312

Both stile and gate, horseway and footpath. Poor Tom hath been
scar'd out of his good wits. Bless thee, good man's son, from...

41

IV,1,2327

Ay, master.

42

IV,1,2334

Give me thy arm.
Poor Tom shall lead thee.

43

IV,6,2598

You do climb up it now. Look how we labour.

44

IV,6,2600

Horrible steep.
Hark, do you hear the sea?

45

IV,6,2603

Why, then, your other senses grow imperfect
By your eyes' anguish.

46

IV,6,2608

Y'are much deceiv'd. In nothing am I chang'd
But in my garments.

47

IV,6,2611

Come on, sir; here's the place. Stand still. How fearful
And dizzy 'tis to cast one's eyes so low!...

48

IV,6,2626

Give me your hand. You are now within a foot
Of th' extreme verge. For all beneath the moon...

49

IV,6,2634

Now fare ye well, good sir.

50

IV,6,2636

[aside]. Why I do trifle thus with his despair
Is done to cure it.

51

IV,6,2647

Gone, sir, farewell.-
And yet I know not how conceit may rob...

52

IV,6,2656

Hadst thou been aught but gossamer, feathers, air,
So many fadom down precipitating,...

53

IV,6,2664

From the dread summit of this chalky bourn.
Look up a-height. The shrill-gorg'd lark so far...

54

IV,6,2672

Give me your arm.
Up- so. How is't? Feel you your legs? You stand.

55

IV,6,2675

This is above all strangeness.
Upon the crown o' th' cliff what thing was that...

56

IV,6,2679

As I stood here below, methought his eyes
Were two full moons; he had a thousand noses,Horns whelk'd and wav'd like the enridged sea....

57

IV,6,2689

Bear free and patient thoughts.
Enter Lear, mad, [fantastically dressed with weeds]....

58

IV,6,2696

O thou side-piercing sight!

59

IV,6,2703

Sweet marjoram.

60

IV,6,2749

[aside] I would not take this from report. It is,
And my heart breaks at it.

61

IV,6,2779

O, matter and impertinency mix'd!
Reason, in madness!

62

IV,6,2817

Hail, gentle sir.

63

IV,6,2819

Do you hear aught, sir, of a battle toward?

64

IV,6,2822

But, by your favour,
How near's the other army?

65

IV,6,2826

I thank you sir. That's all.

66

IV,6,2829

I thank you, sir

67

IV,6,2834

Well pray you, father.

68

IV,6,2836

A most poor man, made tame to fortune's blows,
Who, by the art of known and feeling sorrows,...

69

IV,6,2856

Chill not let go, zir, without vurther 'cagion.

70

IV,6,2858

Good gentleman, go your gait, and let poor voke pass. An chud
ha' bin zwagger'd out of my life, 'twould not ha' bin zo long as...

71

IV,6,2865

Chill pick your teeth, zir. Come! No matter vor your foins.

72

IV,6,2873

I know thee well. A serviceable villain,
As duteous to the vices of thy mistress...

73

IV,6,2877

Sit you down, father; rest you.
Let's see his pockets; these letters that he speaks of...

74

IV,6,2906

Give me your hand.
Far off methinks I hear the beaten drum....

75

V,1,3068

If e'er your Grace had speech with man so poor,
Hear me one word.

76

V,1,3072

Before you fight the battle, ope this letter.
If you have victory, let the trumpet sound...

77

V,1,3080

I was forbid it.
When time shall serve, let but the herald cry,...

78

V,2,3107

Here, father, take the shadow of this tree
For your good host. Pray that the right may thrive....

79

V,2,3114

Away, old man! give me thy hand! away!
King Lear hath lost, he and his daughter ta'en....

80

V,2,3118

What, in ill thoughts again? Men must endure
Their going hence, even as their coming hither;...

81

V,3,3267

Know my name is lost;
By treason's tooth bare-gnawn and canker-bit....

82

V,3,3272

What's he that speaks for Edmund Earl of Gloucester?

83

V,3,3274

Draw thy sword,
That, if my speech offend a noble heart,...

84

V,3,3323

Let's exchange charity.
I am no less in blood than thou art, Edmund;...

85

V,3,3337

Worthy prince, I know't.

86

V,3,3340

By nursing them, my lord. List a brief tale;
And when 'tis told, O that my heart would burst!...

87

V,3,3365

This would have seem'd a period
To such as love not sorrow; but another,...

88

V,3,3381

Kent, sir, the banish'd Kent; who in disguise
Followed his enemy king and did him service...

89

V,3,3386

What kind of help?

90

V,3,3388

What means that bloody knife?

91

V,3,3397

Here comes Kent.

92

V,3,3422

To who, my lord? Who has the office? Send
Thy token of reprieve.

93

V,3,3442

Or image of that horror?

94

V,3,3449

'Tis noble Kent, your friend.

95

V,3,3480

Very bootless.

96

V,3,3501

He faints! My lord, my lord!

97

V,3,3503

Look up, my lord.

98

V,3,3507

He is gone indeed.

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