Speeches (Lines) for Earl of Northumberland
in "Richard II"

Total: 38

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,833

My liege, old Gaunt commends him to your majesty.

2

II,1,835

Nay, nothing; all is said
His tongue is now a stringless instrument;...

3

II,1,915

Well, lords, the Duke of Lancaster is dead.

4

II,1,918

Richly in both, if justice had her right.

5

II,1,921

Nay, speak thy mind; and let him ne'er speak more
That speaks thy words again to do thee harm!

6

II,1,929

Now, afore God, 'tis shame such wrongs are borne
In him, a royal prince, and many moe...

7

II,1,943

Wars have not wasted it, for warr'd he hath not,
But basely yielded upon compromise...

8

II,1,949

Reproach and dissolution hangeth over him.

9

II,1,953

His noble kinsman: most degenerate king!
But, lords, we hear this fearful tempest sing,...

10

II,1,961

Not so; even through the hollow eyes of death
I spy life peering; but I dare not say...

11

II,1,968

Then thus: I have from Port le Blanc, a bay
In Brittany, received intelligence...

12

II,3,1154

Believe me, noble lord,
I am a stranger here in Gloucestershire:...

13

II,3,1174

It is my son, young Harry Percy,
Sent from my brother Worcester, whencesoever....

14

II,3,1178

Why, is he not with the queen?

15

II,3,1182

What was his reason?
He was not so resolved when last we spake together.

16

II,3,1190

Have you forgot the Duke of Hereford, boy?

17

II,3,1194

Then learn to know him now; this is the duke.

18

II,3,1205

How far is it to Berkeley? and what stir
Keeps good old York there with his men of war?

19

II,3,1212

Here come the Lords of Ross and Willoughby,
Bloody with spurring, fiery-red with haste.

20

II,3,1224

It is my Lord of Berkeley, as I guess.

21

II,3,1295

The noble duke hath been too much abused.

22

II,3,1306

The noble duke hath sworn his coming is
But for his own; and for the right of that...

23

III,3,1639

The news is very fair and good, my lord:
Richard not far from hence hath hid his head.

24

III,3,1644

Your grace mistakes; only to be brief
Left I his title out.

25

III,3,1667

O, belike it is the Bishop of Carlisle.

26

III,3,1742

The king of heaven forbid our lord the king
Should so with civil and uncivil arms...

27

III,3,1818

My lord, in the base court he doth attend
To speak with you; may it please you to come down.

28

III,3,1830

Sorrow and grief of heart
Makes him speak fondly, like a frantic man...

29

IV,1,2134

Well have you argued, sir; and, for your pains,
Of capital treason we arrest you here....

30

IV,1,2211

No more, but that you read
These accusations and these grievous crimes...

31

IV,1,2232

My lord, dispatch; read o'er these articles.

32

IV,1,2242

My lord,—

33

IV,1,2259

Read o'er this paper while the glass doth come.

34

IV,1,2262

The commons will not then be satisfied.

35

V,1,2386

My lord, the mind of Bolingbroke is changed:
You must to Pomfret, not unto the Tower....

36

V,1,2404

My guilt be on my head, and there an end.
Take leave and part; for you must part forthwith.

37

V,1,2419

That were some love but little policy.

38

V,6,2886

First, to thy sacred state wish I all happiness.
The next news is, I have to London sent...

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