Speeches (Lines) for Earl of Kent
in "King Lear"

Total: 127

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,2

I thought the King had more affected the Duke of Albany than
Cornwall.

2

I,1,8

Is not this your son, my lord?

3

I,1,11

I cannot conceive you.

4

I,1,15

I cannot wish the fault undone, the issue of it being so
proper.

5

I,1,27

I must love you, and sue to know you better.

6

I,1,125

Good my liege-

7

I,1,145

Royal Lear,
Whom I have ever honour'd as my king,
Lov'd as my father, as my master follow'd,
As my great patron thought on in my prayers-

8

I,1,150

Let it fall rather, though the fork invade
The region of my heart! Be Kent unmannerly
When Lear is mad. What wouldst thou do, old man?
Think'st thou that duty shall have dread to speak
When power to flattery bows? To plainness honour's bound
When majesty falls to folly. Reverse thy doom;
And in thy best consideration check
This hideous rashness. Answer my life my judgment,
Thy youngest daughter does not love thee least,
Nor are those empty-hearted whose low sound
Reverbs no hollowness.

9

I,1,162

My life I never held but as a pawn
To wage against thine enemies; nor fear to lose it,
Thy safety being the motive.

10

I,1,166

See better, Lear, and let me still remain
The true blank of thine eye.

11

I,1,169

Now by Apollo, King,
Thou swear'st thy gods in vain.

12

I,1,173

Do!
Kill thy physician, and the fee bestow
Upon the foul disease. Revoke thy gift,
Or, whilst I can vent clamour from my throat,
I'll tell thee thou dost evil.

13

I,1,192

Fare thee well, King. Since thus thou wilt appear,
Freedom lives hence, and banishment is here.
[To Cordelia] The gods to their dear shelter take thee, maid,
That justly think'st and hast most rightly said!
[To Regan and Goneril] And your large speeches may your deeds
approve,
That good effects may spring from words of love.
Thus Kent, O princes, bids you all adieu;
He'll shape his old course in a country new. Exit.

14

I,4,535

If but as well I other accents borrow,
That can my speech defuse, my good intent
May carry through itself to that full issue
For which I raz'd my likeness. Now, banish'd Kent,
If thou canst serve where thou dost stand condemn'd,
So may it come, thy master, whom thou lov'st,
Shall find thee full of labours.
Horns within. Enter Lear, [Knights,] and Attendants.

15

I,4,545

A man, sir.

16

I,4,547

I do profess to be no less than I seem, to serve him truly
that will put me in trust, to love him that is honest, to
converse with him that is wise and says little, to fear
judgment, to fight when I cannot choose, and to eat no fish.

17

I,4,552

A very honest-hearted fellow, and as poor as the King.

18

I,4,555

Service.

19

I,4,557

You.

20

I,4,559

No, sir; but you have that in your countenance which I would
fain call master.

21

I,4,562

Authority.

22

I,4,564

I can keep honest counsel, ride, run, mar a curious tale in
telling it and deliver a plain message bluntly. That which
ordinary men are fit for, I am qualified in, and the best of me
is diligence.

23

I,4,569

Not so young, sir, to love a woman for singing, nor so old to
dote on her for anything. I have years on my back forty-eight.

24

I,4,615

Nor tripp'd neither, you base football player?

25

I,4,618

Come, sir, arise, away! I'll teach you differences. Away,
away! If you will measure your lubber's length again, tarry; but
away! Go to! Have you wisdom? So.

26

I,4,629

Why, fool?

27

I,4,656

This is nothing, fool.

28

I,4,677

This is not altogether fool, my lord.

29

I,5,885

I will not sleep, my lord, till I have delivered your letter. Exit.

30

II,2,1076

Ay.

31

II,2,1078

I' th' mire.

32

II,2,1080

I love thee not.

33

II,2,1082

If I had thee in Lipsbury Pinfold, I would make thee care for
me.

34

II,2,1085

Fellow, I know thee.

35

II,2,1087

A knave; a rascal; an eater of broken meats; a base, proud,
shallow, beggarly, three-suited, hundred-pound, filthy,
worsted-stocking knave; a lily-liver'd, action-taking, whoreson,
glass-gazing, superserviceable, finical rogue;
one-trunk-inheriting slave; one that wouldst be a bawd in way of
good service, and art nothing but the composition of a knave,
beggar, coward, pander, and the son and heir of a mongrel bitch;
one whom I will beat into clamorous whining, if thou deny the
least syllable of thy addition.

36

II,2,1098

What a brazen-fac'd varlet art thou, to deny thou knowest me!
Is it two days ago since I beat thee and tripp'd up thy heels
before the King? [Draws his sword.] Draw, you rogue! for, though
it be night, yet the moon shines. I'll make a sop o' th'
moonshine o' you. Draw, you whoreson cullionly barbermonger!
draw!

37

II,2,1105

Draw, you rascal! You come with letters against the King, and
take Vanity the puppet's part against the royalty of her father.
Draw, you rogue, or I'll so carbonado your shanks! Draw, you
rascal! Come your ways!

38

II,2,1110

Strike, you slave! Stand, rogue! Stand, you neat slave!
Strike! [Beats him.]

39

II,2,1115

With you, goodman boy, an you please! Come, I'll flesh ye!
Come on, young master!

40

II,2,1123

No marvel, you have so bestirr'd your valour. You cowardly
rascal, nature disclaims in thee; a tailor made thee.

41

II,2,1126

Ay, a tailor, sir. A stonecutter or a painter could not have
made him so ill, though he had been but two hours at the trade.

42

II,2,1131

Thou whoreson zed! thou unnecessary letter! My lord, if
you'll give me leave, I will tread this unbolted villain into
mortar and daub the walls of a jakes with him. 'Spare my grey
beard,' you wagtail?

43

II,2,1137

Yes, sir, but anger hath a privilege.

44

II,2,1139

That such a slave as this should wear a sword,
Who wears no honesty. Such smiling rogues as these,
Like rats, oft bite the holy cords atwain
Which are too intrinse t' unloose; smooth every passion
That in the natures of their lords rebel,
Bring oil to fire, snow to their colder moods;
Renege, affirm, and turn their halcyon beaks
With every gale and vary of their masters,
Knowing naught (like dogs) but following.
A plague upon your epileptic visage!
Smile you my speeches, as I were a fool?
Goose, an I had you upon Sarum Plain,
I'ld drive ye cackling home to Camelot.

45

II,2,1154

No contraries hold more antipathy
Than I and such a knave.

46

II,2,1157

His countenance likes me not.

47

II,2,1159

Sir, 'tis my occupation to be plain.
I have seen better faces in my time
Than stands on any shoulder that I see
Before me at this instant.

48

II,2,1173

Sir, in good faith, in sincere verity,
Under th' allowance of your great aspect,
Whose influence, like the wreath of radiant fire
On flickering Phoebus' front-

49

II,2,1178

To go out of my dialect, which you discommend so much. I
know, sir, I am no flatterer. He that beguil'd you in a plain
accent was a plain knave, which, for my part, I will not be,
though I should win your displeasure to entreat me to't.

50

II,2,1193

None of these rogues and cowards
But Ajax is their fool.

51

II,2,1198

Sir, I am too old to learn.
Call not your stocks for me. I serve the King;
On whose employment I was sent to you.
You shall do small respect, show too bold malice
Against the grace and person of my master,
Stocking his messenger.

52

II,2,1207

Why, madam, if I were your father's dog,
You should not use me so.

53

II,2,1231

Pray do not, sir. I have watch'd and travell'd hard.
Some time I shall sleep out, the rest I'll whistle.
A good man's fortune may grow out at heels.
Give you good morrow!

54

II,2,1236

Good King, that must approve the common saw,
Thou out of heaven's benediction com'st
To the warm sun!
Approach, thou beacon to this under globe,
That by thy comfortable beams I may
Peruse this letter. Nothing almost sees miracles
But misery. I know 'tis from Cordelia,
Who hath most fortunately been inform'd
Of my obscured course- and [reads] 'shall find time
From this enormous state, seeking to give
Losses their remedies'- All weary and o'erwatch'd,
Take vantage, heavy eyes, not to behold
This shameful lodging.
Fortune, good night; smile once more, turn thy wheel.

55

II,4,1279

Hail to thee, noble master!

56

II,4,1282

No, my lord.

57

II,4,1289

It is both he and she-
Your son and daughter.

58

II,4,1292

Yes.

59

II,4,1294

I say yea.

60

II,4,1296

Yes, they have.

61

II,4,1298

By Juno, I swear ay!

62

II,4,1305

My lord, when at their home
I did commend your Highness' letters to them,
Ere I was risen from the place that show'd
My duty kneeling, came there a reeking post,
Stew'd in his haste, half breathless, panting forth
From Goneril his mistress salutations;
Deliver'd letters, spite of intermission,
Which presently they read; on whose contents,
They summon'd up their meiny, straight took horse,
Commanded me to follow and attend
The leisure of their answer, gave me cold looks,
And meeting here the other messenger,
Whose welcome I perceiv'd had poison'd mine-
Being the very fellow which of late
Display'd so saucily against your Highness-
Having more man than wit about me, drew.
He rais'd the house with loud and coward cries.
Your son and daughter found this trespass worth
The shame which here it suffers.

63

II,4,1336

With the Earl, sir, here within.

64

II,4,1340

None.
How chance the King comes with so small a number?

65

II,4,1344

Why, fool?

66

II,4,1361

Where learn'd you this, fool?

67

III,1,1618

Who's there, besides foul weather?

68

III,1,1620

I know you. Where's the King?

69

III,1,1633

But who is with him?

70

III,1,1636

Sir, I do know you,
And dare upon the warrant of my note
Commend a dear thing to you. There is division
(Although as yet the face of it be cover'd
With mutual cunning) 'twixt Albany and Cornwall;
Who have (as who have not, that their great stars
Thron'd and set high?) servants, who seem no less,
Which are to France the spies and speculations
Intelligent of our state. What hath been seen,
Either in snuffs and packings of the Dukes,
Or the hard rein which both of them have borne
Against the old kind King, or something deeper,
Whereof, perchance, these are but furnishings-
But, true it is, from France there comes a power
Into this scattered kingdom, who already,
Wise in our negligence, have secret feet
In some of our best ports and are at point
To show their open banner. Now to you:
If on my credit you dare build so far
To make your speed to Dover, you shall find
Some that will thank you, making just report
Of how unnatural and bemadding sorrow
The King hath cause to plain.
I am a gentleman of blood and breeding,
And from some knowledge and assurance offer
This office to you.

71

III,1,1663

No, do not.
For confirmation that I am much more
Than my out-wall, open this purse and take
What it contains. If you shall see Cordelia
(As fear not but you shall), show her this ring,
And she will tell you who your fellow is
That yet you do not know. Fie on this storm!
I will go seek the King.

72

III,1,1672

Few words, but, to effect, more than all yet:
That, when we have found the King (in which your pain
That way, I'll this), he that first lights on him
Holla the other.

73

III,2,1715

Who's there?

74

III,2,1718

Alas, sir, are you here? Things that love night
Love not such nights as these. The wrathful skies
Gallow the very wanderers of the dark
And make them keep their caves. Since I was man,
Such sheets of fire, such bursts of horrid thunder,
Such groans of roaring wind and rain, I never
Remember to have heard. Man's nature cannot carry
Th' affliction nor the fear.

75

III,2,1738

Alack, bareheaded?
Gracious my lord, hard by here is a hovel;
Some friendship will it lend you 'gainst the tempest.
Repose you there, whilst I to this hard house
(More harder than the stones whereof 'tis rais'd,
Which even but now, demanding after you,
Denied me to come in) return, and force
Their scanted courtesy.

76

III,4,1801

Here is the place, my lord. Good my lord, enter.
The tyranny of the open night 's too rough
For nature to endure.

77

III,4,1805

Good my lord, enter here.

78

III,4,1807

I had rather break mine own. Good my lord, enter.

79

III,4,1825

Good my lord, enter here.

80

III,4,1843

Give me thy hand. Who's there?

81

III,4,1845

What art thou that dost grumble there i' th' straw?
Come forth.

82

III,4,1868

He hath no daughters, sir.

83

III,4,1919

How fares your Grace?

84

III,4,1921

Who's there? What is't you seek?

85

III,4,1948

Good my lord, take his offer; go into th' house.

86

III,4,1953

Importune him once more to go, my lord.
His wits begin t' unsettle.

87

III,4,1970

This way, my lord.

88

III,4,1973

Good my lord, soothe him; let him take the fellow.

89

III,4,1975

Sirrah, come on; go along with us.

90

III,6,2010

All the power of his wits have given way to his impatience.
The gods reward your kindness!

91

III,6,2037

How do you, sir? Stand you not so amaz'd.
Will you lie down and rest upon the cushions?

92

III,6,2060

O pity! Sir, where is the patience now
That you so oft have boasted to retain?

93

III,6,2082

Now, good my lord, lie here and rest awhile.

94

III,6,2088

Here, sir; but trouble him not; his wits are gone.

95

III,6,2099

Oppressed nature sleeps.
This rest might yet have balm'd thy broken senses,
Which, if convenience will not allow,
Stand in hard cure. [To the Fool] Come, help to bear thy master.
Thou must not stay behind.

96

IV,3,2454

Why the King of France is so suddenly gone back know you the
reason?

97

IV,3,2460

Who hath he left behind him general?

98

IV,3,2462

Did your letters pierce the Queen to any demonstration of
grief?

99

IV,3,2469

O, then it mov'd her?

100

IV,3,2479

Made she no verbal question?

101

IV,3,2488

It is the stars,
The stars above us, govern our conditions;
Else one self mate and mate could not beget
Such different issues. You spoke not with her since?

102

IV,3,2493

Was this before the King return'd?

103

IV,3,2495

Well, sir, the poor distressed Lear's i' th' town;
Who sometime, in his better tune, remembers
What we are come about, and by no means
Will yield to see his daughter.

104

IV,3,2500

A sovereign shame so elbows him; his own unkindness,
That stripp'd her from his benediction, turn'd her
To foreign casualties, gave her dear rights
To his dog-hearted daughters- these things sting
His mind so venomously that burning shame
Detains him from Cordelia.

105

IV,3,2507

Of Albany's and Cornwall's powers you heard not?

106

IV,3,2509

Well, sir, I'll bring you to our master Lear
And leave you to attend him. Some dear cause
Will in concealment wrap me up awhile.
When I am known aright, you shall not grieve
Lending me this acquaintance. I pray you go
Along with me. Exeunt.

107

IV,7,2913

To be acknowledg'd, madam, is o'erpaid.
All my reports go with the modest truth;
Nor more nor clipp'd, but so.

108

IV,7,2919

Pardon, dear madam.
Yet to be known shortens my made intent.
My boon I make it that you know me not
Till time and I think meet.

109

IV,7,2945

Kind and dear princess!

110

IV,7,2998

In your own kingdom, sir.

111

IV,7,3010

Most certain, sir.

112

IV,7,3012

As 'tis said, the bastard son of Gloucester.

113

IV,7,3015

Report is changeable. 'Tis time to look about; the powers of
the kingdom approach apace.

114

IV,7,3019

My point and period will be throughly wrought,
Or well or ill, as this day's battle's fought. Exit.

115

V,3,3404

I am come
To bid my king and master aye good night.
Is he not here?

116

V,3,3411

Alack, why thus?

117

V,3,3441

Is this the promis'd end?

118

V,3,3447

O my good master!

119

V,3,3462

If fortune brag of two she lov'd and hated,
One of them we behold.

120

V,3,3465

The same-
Your servant Kent. Where is your servant Caius?

121

V,3,3469

No, my good lord; I am the very man-

122

V,3,3471

That from your first of difference and decay
Have followed your sad steps.

123

V,3,3474

Nor no man else! All's cheerless, dark, and deadly.
Your eldest daughters have fordone themselves,
And desperately are dead.

124

V,3,3502

Break, heart; I prithee break!

125

V,3,3504

Vex not his ghost. O, let him pass! He hates him
That would upon the rack of this tough world
Stretch him out longer.

126

V,3,3508

The wonder is, he hath endur'd so long.
He but usurp'd his life.

127

V,3,3514

I have a journey, sir, shortly to go.
My master calls me; I must not say no.

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