Speeches (Lines) for Duke of Cornwall
in "King Lear"

Total: 53

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,1023

How now, my noble friend? Since I came hither
(Which I can call but now) I have heard strange news.

2

II,1,1042

Nor I, assure thee, Regan.
Edmund, I hear that you have shown your father...

3

II,1,1048

Is he pursued?

4

II,1,1050

If he be taken, he shall never more
Be fear'd of doing harm. Make your own purpose,...

5

II,1,1060

You know not why we came to visit you-

6

II,2,1118

Keep peace, upon your lives!
He dies that strikes again. What is the matter?

7

II,2,1121

What is your difference? Speak.

8

II,2,1125

Thou art a strange fellow. A tailor make a man?

9

II,2,1128

Speak yet, how grew your quarrel?

10

II,2,1135

Peace, sirrah!
You beastly knave, know you no reverence?

11

II,2,1138

Why art thou angry?

12

II,2,1152

What, art thou mad, old fellow?

13

II,2,1156

Why dost thou call him knave? What is his fault?

14

II,2,1158

No more perchance does mine, or his, or hers.

15

II,2,1163

This is some fellow
Who, having been prais'd for bluntness, doth affect...

16

II,2,1177

What mean'st by this?

17

II,2,1182

What was th' offence you gave him?

18

II,2,1195

Fetch forth the stocks!
You stubborn ancient knave, you reverent braggart,...

19

II,2,1204

Fetch forth the stocks! As I have life and honour,
There shall he sit till noon.

20

II,2,1210

This is a fellow of the selfsame colour
Our sister speaks of. Come, bring away the stocks!

21

II,2,1221

I'll answer that.

22

II,4,1405

Hail to your Grace!

23

II,4,1449

Fie, sir, fie!

24

II,4,1471

What trumpet's that?

25

II,4,1479

What means your Grace?

26

II,4,1493

I set him there, sir; but his own disorders
Deserv'd much less advancement.

27

II,4,1589

Let us withdraw; 'twill be a storm.

28

II,4,1598

Followed the old man forth.
[Enter Gloucester.]...

29

II,4,1602

Whither is he going?

30

II,4,1604

'Tis best to give him way; he leads himself.

31

II,4,1615

Shut up your doors, my lord: 'tis a wild night.
My Regan counsels well. Come out o' th' storm. [Exeunt.]

32

III,5,1984

I will have my revenge ere I depart his house.

33

III,5,1987

I now perceive it was not altogether your brother's evil
disposition made him seek his death; but a provoking merit, set...

34

III,5,1994

Go with me to the Duchess.

35

III,5,1997

True or false, it hath made thee Earl of Gloucester.
Seek out where thy father is, that he may be ready for our...

36

III,5,2003

I will lay trust upon thee, and thou shalt find a dearer
father in my love.

37

III,7,2121

[to Goneril] Post speedily to my lord your husband, show him
this letter. The army of France is landed.- Seek out the traitor...

38

III,7,2127

Leave him to my displeasure. Edmund, keep you our sister
company. The revenges we are bound to take upon your traitorous...

39

III,7,2140

Get horses for your mistress.

40

III,7,2142

Edmund, farewell. [Exeunt Goneril, Edmund, and Oswald.]
Go seek the traitor Gloucester,...

41

III,7,2151

Bind fast his corky arms.

42

III,7,2154

Bind him, I say.

43

III,7,2158

To this chair bind him. Villain, thou shalt find-

44

III,7,2168

Come, sir, what letters had you late from France?

45

III,7,2170

And what confederacy have you with the traitors
Late footed in the kingdom?

46

III,7,2177

Cunning.

47

III,7,2179

Where hast thou sent the King?

48

III,7,2182

Wherefore to Dover? Let him first answer that.

49

III,7,2196

See't shalt thou never. Fellows, hold the chair.
Upon these eyes of thine I'll set my foot.

50

III,7,2201

If you see vengeance-

51

III,7,2210

My villain! Draw and fight.

52

III,7,2216

Lest it see more, prevent it. Out, vile jelly!
Where is thy lustre now?

53

III,7,2230

I have receiv'd a hurt. Follow me, lady.
Turn out that eyeless villain. Throw this slave...

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