Speeches (Lines) for Duke of Burgundy
in "Henry VI, Part I"

Total: 17

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,684

Duke of Bedford. Coward of France! how much he wrongs his fame,
Despairing of his own arm's fortitude,
To join with witches and the help of hell!

Duke of Burgundy. Traitors have never other company.
But what's that Pucelle whom they term so pure?


2

II,1,688

Duke of Bedford. A maid! and be so martial!

Duke of Burgundy. Pray God she prove not masculine ere long,
If underneath the standard of the French
She carry armour as she hath begun.


3

II,1,700

Duke of Bedford. Agreed: I'll to yond corner.

Duke of Burgundy. And I to this.


4

II,2,786

Duke of Bedford. 'Tis thought, Lord Talbot, when the fight began,
Roused on the sudden from their drowsy beds,
They did amongst the troops of armed men
Leap o'er the walls for refuge in the field.

Duke of Burgundy. Myself, as far as I could well discern
For smoke and dusky vapours of the night,
Am sure I scared the Dauphin and his trull,
When arm in arm they both came swiftly running,
Like to a pair of loving turtle-doves
That could not live asunder day or night.
After that things are set in order here,
We'll follow them with all the power we have.


5

II,2,805

Messenger. The virtuous lady, Countess of Auvergne,
With modesty admiring thy renown,
By me entreats, great lord, thou wouldst vouchsafe
To visit her poor castle where she lies,
That she may boast she hath beheld the man
Whose glory fills the world with loud report.

Duke of Burgundy. Is it even so? Nay, then, I see our wars
Will turn unto a peaceful comic sport,
When ladies crave to be encounter'd with.
You may not, my lord, despise her gentle suit.


6

III,2,1498

Joan la Pucelle. Good morrow, gallants! want ye corn for bread?
I think the Duke of Burgundy will fast
Before he'll buy again at such a rate:
'Twas full of darnel; do you like the taste?

Duke of Burgundy. Scoff on, vile fiend and shameless courtezan!
I trust ere long to choke thee with thine own
And make thee curse the harvest of that corn.


7

III,2,1540

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. And there will we be too, ere it be long,
Or else reproach be Talbot's greatest fame!
Vow, Burgundy, by honour of thy house,
Prick'd on by public wrongs sustain'd in France,
Either to get the town again or die:
And I, as sure as English Henry lives
And as his father here was conqueror,
As sure as in this late-betrayed town
Great Coeur-de-lion's heart was buried,
So sure I swear to get the town or die.

Duke of Burgundy. My vows are equal partners with thy vows.


8

III,2,1548

Duke of Bedford. Lord Talbot, do not so dishonour me:
Here will I sit before the walls of Rouen
And will be partner of your weal or woe.

Duke of Burgundy. Courageous Bedford, let us now persuade you.


9

III,2,1583

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Lost, and recover'd in a day again!
This is a double honour, Burgundy:
Yet heavens have glory for this victory!

Duke of Burgundy. Warlike and martial Talbot, Burgundy
Enshrines thee in his heart and there erects
Thy noble deeds as valour's monuments.


10

III,2,1595

Lord Talbot/Earl of Shrewsbury. Thanks, gentle duke. But where is Pucelle now?
I think her old familiar is asleep:
Now where's the Bastard's braves, and Charles his gleeks?
What, all amort? Rouen hangs her head for grief
That such a valiant company are fled.
Now will we take some order in the town,
Placing therein some expert officers,
And then depart to Paris to the king,
For there young Henry with his nobles lie.

Duke of Burgundy. What wills Lord Talbot pleaseth Burgundy.


11

III,3,1647

Charles, King of France. A parley with the Duke of Burgundy!

Duke of Burgundy. Who craves a parley with the Burgundy?


12

III,3,1649

Joan la Pucelle. The princely Charles of France, thy countryman.

Duke of Burgundy. What say'st thou, Charles? for I am marching hence.


13

III,3,1653

Joan la Pucelle. Brave Burgundy, undoubted hope of France!
Stay, let thy humble handmaid speak to thee.

Duke of Burgundy. Speak on; but be not over-tedious.


14

III,3,1668

Joan la Pucelle. Look on thy country, look on fertile France,
And see the cities and the towns defaced
By wasting ruin of the cruel foe.
As looks the mother on her lowly babe
When death doth close his tender dying eyes,
See, see the pining malady of France;
Behold the wounds, the most unnatural wounds,
Which thou thyself hast given her woful breast.
O, turn thy edged sword another way;
Strike those that hurt, and hurt not those that help.
One drop of blood drawn from thy country's bosom
Should grieve thee more than streams of foreign gore:
Return thee therefore with a flood of tears,
And wash away thy country's stained spots.

Duke of Burgundy. Either she hath bewitch'd me with her words,
Or nature makes me suddenly relent.


15

III,3,1688

Joan la Pucelle. Besides, all French and France exclaims on thee,
Doubting thy birth and lawful progeny.
Who joint'st thou with but with a lordly nation
That will not trust thee but for profit's sake?
When Talbot hath set footing once in France
And fashion'd thee that instrument of ill,
Who then but English Henry will be lord
And thou be thrust out like a fugitive?
Call we to mind, and mark but this for proof,
Was not the Duke of Orleans thy foe?
And was he not in England prisoner?
But when they heard he was thine enemy,
They set him free without his ransom paid,
In spite of Burgundy and all his friends.
See, then, thou fight'st against thy countrymen
And joint'st with them will be thy slaughtermen.
Come, come, return; return, thou wandering lord:
Charles and the rest will take thee in their arms.

Duke of Burgundy. I am vanquished; these haughty words of hers
Have batter'd me like roaring cannon-shot,
And made me almost yield upon my knees.
Forgive me, country, and sweet countrymen,
And, lords, accept this hearty kind embrace:
My forces and my power of men are yours:
So farewell, Talbot; I'll no longer trust thee.


16

IV,7,2299

Joan la Pucelle. Once I encounter'd him, and thus I said:
'Thou maiden youth, be vanquish'd by a maid:'
But, with a proud majestical high scorn,
He answer'd thus: 'Young Talbot was not born
To be the pillage of a giglot wench:'
So, rushing in the bowels of the French,
He left me proudly, as unworthy fight.

Duke of Burgundy. Doubtless he would have made a noble knight;
See, where he lies inhearsed in the arms
Of the most bloody nurser of his harms!


17

V,2,2439

Charles, King of France. Somewhat too sudden, sirs, the warning is;
But we will presently provide for them.

Duke of Burgundy. I trust the ghost of Talbot is not there:
Now he is gone, my lord, you need not fear.


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