Speeches (Lines) for Duke
in "As You Like It"

Total: 32

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,548

Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile,
Hath not old custom made this life more sweet
Than that of painted pomp? Are not these woods
More free from peril than the envious court?
Here feel we not the penalty of Adam,
The seasons' difference; as the icy fang
And churlish chiding of the winter's wind,
Which when it bites and blows upon my body,
Even till I shrink with cold, I smile and say
'This is no flattery; these are counsellors
That feelingly persuade me what I am.'
Sweet are the uses of adversity,
Which, like the toad, ugly and venomous,
Wears yet a precious jewel in his head;
And this our life, exempt from public haunt,
Finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks,
Sermons in stones, and good in everything.
I would not change it.

2

II,1,569

Come, shall we go and kill us venison?
And yet it irks me the poor dappled fools,
Being native burghers of this desert city,
Should, in their own confines, with forked heads
Have their round haunches gor'd.

3

II,1,593

But what said Jaques?
Did he not moralize this spectacle?

4

II,1,614

And did you leave him in this contemplation?

5

II,1,617

Show me the place;
I love to cope him in these sullen fits,
For then he's full of matter.

6

II,7,894

I think he be transform'd into a beast;
For I can nowhere find him like a man.

7

II,7,898

If he, compact of jars, grow musical,
We shall have shortly discord in the spheres.
Go seek him; tell him I would speak with him.

8

II,7,903

Why, how now, monsieur! what a life is this,
That your poor friends must woo your company?
What, you look merrily!

9

II,7,929

What fool is this?

10

II,7,938

Thou shalt have one.

11

II,7,957

Fie on thee! I can tell what thou wouldst do.

12

II,7,959

Most mischievous foul sin, in chiding sin;
For thou thyself hast been a libertine,
As sensual as the brutish sting itself;
And all th' embossed sores and headed evils
That thou with license of free foot hast caught
Wouldst thou disgorge into the general world.

13

II,7,988

Art thou thus bolden'd, man, by thy distress?
Or else a rude despiser of good manners,
That in civility thou seem'st so empty?

14

II,7,998

What would you have? Your gentleness shall force
More than your force move us to gentleness.

15

II,7,1001

Sit down and feed, and welcome to our table.

16

II,7,1016

True is it that we have seen better days,
And have with holy bell been knoll'd to church,
And sat at good men's feasts, and wip'd our eyes
Of drops that sacred pity hath engend'red;
And therefore sit you down in gentleness,
And take upon command what help we have
That to your wanting may be minist'red.

17

II,7,1030

Go find him out.
And we will nothing waste till you return.

18

II,7,1033

Thou seest we are not all alone unhappy:
This wide and universal theatre
Presents more woeful pageants than the scene
Wherein we play in.

19

II,7,1066

Welcome. Set down your venerable burden,
And let him feed.

20

II,7,1071

Welcome; fall to. I will not trouble you
As yet to question you about your fortunes.
Give us some music; and, good cousin, sing.
SONG
Blow, blow, thou winter wind,
Thou art not so unkind
As man's ingratitude;
Thy tooth is not so keen,
Because thou art not seen,
Although thy breath be rude.
Heigh-ho! sing heigh-ho! unto the green holly.
Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly.
Then, heigh-ho, the holly!
This life is most jolly.
Freeze, freeze, thou bitter sky,
That dost not bite so nigh
As benefits forgot;
Though thou the waters warp,
Thy sting is not so sharp
As friend rememb'red not.
Heigh-ho! sing, &c.

21

II,7,1092

If that you were the good Sir Rowland's son,
As you have whisper'd faithfully you were,
And as mine eye doth his effigies witness
Most truly limn'd and living in your face,
Be truly welcome hither. I am the Duke
That lov'd your father. The residue of your fortune,
Go to my cave and tell me. Good old man,
Thou art right welcome as thy master is.
Support him by the arm. Give me your hand,
And let me all your fortunes understand. Exeunt

22

V,4,2402

Dost thou believe, Orlando, that the boy
Can do all this that he hath promised?

23

V,4,2410

That would I, had I kingdoms to give with her.

24

V,4,2429

I do remember in this shepherd boy
Some lively touches of my daughter's favour.

25

V,4,2455

I like him very well.

26

V,4,2463

By my faith, he is very swift and sententious.

27

V,4,2498

He uses his folly like a stalking-horse, and under the
presentation of that he shoots his wit.
[Enter HYMEN, ROSALIND, and CELIA. Still MUSIC]
HYMEN. Then is there mirth in heaven,
When earthly things made even
Atone together.
Good Duke, receive thy daughter;
Hymen from heaven brought her,
Yea, brought her hither,
That thou mightst join her hand with his,
Whose heart within his bosom is.

28

V,4,2511

If there be truth in sight, you are my daughter.

29

V,4,2541

O my dear niece, welcome thou art to me!
Even daughter, welcome in no less degree.

30

V,4,2562

Welcome, young man.
Thou offer'st fairly to thy brothers' wedding:
To one, his lands withheld; and to the other,
A land itself at large, a potent dukedom.
First, in this forest let us do those ends
That here were well begun and well begot;
And after, every of this happy number,
That have endur'd shrewd days and nights with us,
Shall share the good of our returned fortune,
According to the measure of their states.
Meantime, forget this new-fall'n dignity,
And fall into our rustic revelry.
Play, music; and you brides and bridegrooms all,
With measure heap'd in joy, to th' measures fall.

31

V,4,2590

Stay, Jaques, stay.

32

V,4,2593

Proceed, proceed. We will begin these rites,
As we do trust they'll end, in true delights. [A dance] Exeunt EPILOGUE

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