Speeches (Lines) for Don Pedro
in "Much Ado about Nothing"

Total: 135

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,85

Good Signior Leonato, you are come to meet your
trouble: the fashion of the world is to avoid
cost, and you encounter it.

2

I,1,92

You embrace your charge too willingly. I think this
is your daughter.

3

I,1,97

You have it full, Benedick: we may guess by this
what you are, being a man. Truly, the lady fathers
herself. Be happy, lady; for you are like an
honourable father.

4

I,1,131

That is the sum of all, Leonato. Signior Claudio
and Signior Benedick, my dear friend Leonato hath
invited you all. I tell him we shall stay here at
the least a month; and he heartily prays some
occasion may detain us longer. I dare swear he is no
hypocrite, but prays from his heart.

5

I,1,144

Your hand, Leonato; we will go together.

6

I,1,184

What secret hath held you here, that you followed
not to Leonato's?

7

I,1,187

I charge thee on thy allegiance.

8

I,1,200

Amen, if you love her; for the lady is very well worthy.

9

I,1,202

By my troth, I speak my thought.

10

I,1,206

That she is worthy, I know.

11

I,1,210

Thou wast ever an obstinate heretic in the despite
of beauty.

12

I,1,222

I shall see thee, ere I die, look pale with love.

13

I,1,229

Well, if ever thou dost fall from this faith, thou
wilt prove a notable argument.

14

I,1,234

Well, as time shall try: 'In time the savage bull
doth bear the yoke.'

15

I,1,243

Nay, if Cupid have not spent all his quiver in
Venice, thou wilt quake for this shortly.

16

I,1,246

Well, you temporize with the hours. In the
meantime, good Signior Benedick, repair to
Leonato's: commend me to him and tell him I will
not fail him at supper; for indeed he hath made
great preparation.

17

I,1,254

The sixth of July: Your loving friend, Benedick.

18

I,1,262

My love is thine to teach: teach it but how,
And thou shalt see how apt it is to learn
Any hard lesson that may do thee good.

19

I,1,266

No child but Hero; she's his only heir.
Dost thou affect her, Claudio?

20

I,1,278

Thou wilt be like a lover presently
And tire the hearer with a book of words.
If thou dost love fair Hero, cherish it,
And I will break with her and with her father,
And thou shalt have her. Was't not to this end
That thou began'st to twist so fine a story?

21

I,1,288

What need the bridge much broader than the flood?
The fairest grant is the necessity.
Look, what will serve is fit: 'tis once, thou lovest,
And I will fit thee with the remedy.
I know we shall have revelling to-night:
I will assume thy part in some disguise
And tell fair Hero I am Claudio,
And in her bosom I'll unclasp my heart
And take her hearing prisoner with the force
And strong encounter of my amorous tale:
Then after to her father will I break;
And the conclusion is, she shall be thine.
In practise let us put it presently.

22

II,1,475

Lady, will you walk about with your friend?

23

II,1,478

With me in your company?

24

II,1,480

And when please you to say so?

25

II,1,483

My visor is Philemon's roof; within the house is Jove.

26

II,1,485

Speak low, if you speak love.

27

II,1,595

Now, signior, where's the count? did you see him?

28

II,1,603

To be whipped! What's his fault?

29

II,1,607

Wilt thou make a trust a transgression? The
transgression is in the stealer.

30

II,1,613

I will but teach them to sing, and restore them to
the owner.

31

II,1,617

The Lady Beatrice hath a quarrel to you: the
gentleman that danced with her told her she is much
wronged by you.

32

II,1,642

Look, here she comes.

33

II,1,653

None, but to desire your good company.

34

II,1,657

Come, lady, come; you have lost the heart of
Signior Benedick.

35

II,1,663

You have put him down, lady, you have put him down.

36

II,1,667

Why, how now, count! wherefore are you sad?

37

II,1,669

How then? sick?

38

II,1,674

I' faith, lady, I think your blazon to be true;
though, I'll be sworn, if he be so, his conceit is
false. Here, Claudio, I have wooed in thy name, and
fair Hero is won: I have broke with her father,
and his good will obtained: name the day of
marriage, and God give thee joy!

39

II,1,690

In faith, lady, you have a merry heart.

40

II,1,698

Lady Beatrice, I will get you one.

41

II,1,702

Will you have me, lady?

42

II,1,707

Your silence most offends me, and to be merry best
becomes you; for, out of question, you were born in
a merry hour.

43

II,1,716

By my troth, a pleasant-spirited lady.

44

II,1,722

She cannot endure to hear tell of a husband.

45

II,1,724

She were an excellent wife for Benedict.

46

II,1,727

County Claudio, when mean you to go to church?

47

II,1,733

Come, you shake the head at so long a breathing:
but, I warrant thee, Claudio, the time shall not go
dully by us. I will in the interim undertake one of
Hercules' labours; which is, to bring Signior
Benedick and the Lady Beatrice into a mountain of
affection the one with the other. I would fain have
it a match, and I doubt not but to fashion it, if
you three will but minister such assistance as I
shall give you direction.

48

II,1,745

And you too, gentle Hero?

49

II,1,748

And Benedick is not the unhopefullest husband that
I know. Thus far can I praise him; he is of a noble
strain, of approved valour and confirmed honesty. I
will teach you how to humour your cousin, that she
shall fall in love with Benedick; and I, with your
two helps, will so practise on Benedick that, in
despite of his quick wit and his queasy stomach, he
shall fall in love with Beatrice. If we can do this,
Cupid is no longer an archer: his glory shall be
ours, for we are the only love-gods. Go in with me,
and I will tell you my drift.

50

II,3,852

Come, shall we hear this music?

51

II,3,855

See you where Benedick hath hid himself?

52

II,3,859

Come, Balthasar, we'll hear that song again.

53

II,3,862

It is the witness still of excellency
To put a strange face on his own perfection.
I pray thee, sing, and let me woo no more.

54

II,3,869

Now, pray thee, come;
Or, if thou wilt hold longer argument,
Do it in notes.

55

II,3,874

Why, these are very crotchets that he speaks;
Note, notes, forsooth, and nothing.

56

II,3,895

By my troth, a good song.

57

II,3,897

Ha, no, no, faith; thou singest well enough for a shift.

58

II,3,903

Yea, marry, dost thou hear, Balthasar? I pray thee,
get us some excellent music; for to-morrow night we
would have it at the Lady Hero's chamber-window.

59

II,3,907

Do so: farewell.
[Exit BALTHASAR]
Come hither, Leonato. What was it you told me of
to-day, that your niece Beatrice was in love with
Signior Benedick?

60

II,3,921

May be she doth but counterfeit.

61

II,3,926

Why, what effects of passion shows she?

62

II,3,931

How, how, pray you? You amaze me: I would have I
thought her spirit had been invincible against all
assaults of affection.

63

II,3,940

Hath she made her affection known to Benedick?

64

II,3,967

It were good that Benedick knew of it by some
other, if she will not discover it.

65

II,3,971

An he should, it were an alms to hang him. She's an
excellent sweet lady; and, out of all suspicion,
she is virtuous.

66

II,3,975

In every thing but in loving Benedick.

67

II,3,980

I would she had bestowed this dotage on me: I would
have daffed all other respects and made her half
myself. I pray you, tell Benedick of it, and hear
what a' will say.

68

II,3,990

She doth well: if she should make tender of her
love, 'tis very possible he'll scorn it; for the
man, as you know all, hath a contemptible spirit.

69

II,3,994

He hath indeed a good outward happiness.

70

II,3,996

He doth indeed show some sparks that are like wit.

71

II,3,998

As Hector, I assure you: and in the managing of
quarrels you may say he is wise; for either he
avoids them with great discretion, or undertakes
them with a most Christian-like fear.

72

II,3,1005

And so will he do; for the man doth fear God,
howsoever it seems not in him by some large jests
he will make. Well I am sorry for your niece. Shall
we go seek Benedick, and tell him of her love?

73

II,3,1012

Well, we will hear further of it by your daughter:
let it cool the while. I love Benedick well; and I
could wish he would modestly examine himself, to see
how much he is unworthy so good a lady.

74

II,3,1019

Let there be the same net spread for her; and that
must your daughter and her gentlewomen carry. The
sport will be, when they hold one an opinion of
another's dotage, and no such matter: that's the
scene that I would see, which will be merely a
dumb-show. Let us send her to call him in to dinner.

75

III,2,1199

I do but stay till your marriage be consummate, and
then go I toward Arragon.

76

III,2,1203

Nay, that would be as great a soil in the new gloss
of your marriage as to show a child his new coat
and forbid him to wear it. I will only be bold
with Benedick for his company; for, from the crown
of his head to the sole of his foot, he is all
mirth: he hath twice or thrice cut Cupid's
bow-string and the little hangman dare not shoot at
him; he hath a heart as sound as a bell and his
tongue is the clapper, for what his heart thinks his
tongue speaks.

77

III,2,1216

Hang him, truant! there's no true drop of blood in
him, to be truly touched with love: if he be sad,
he wants money.

78

III,2,1220

Draw it.

79

III,2,1223

What! sigh for the toothache?

80

III,2,1228

There is no appearance of fancy in him, unless it be
a fancy that he hath to strange disguises; as, to be
a Dutchman today, a Frenchman to-morrow, or in the
shape of two countries at once, as, a German from
the waist downward, all slops, and a Spaniard from
the hip upward, no doublet. Unless he have a fancy
to this foolery, as it appears he hath, he is no
fool for fancy, as you would have it appear he is.

81

III,2,1239

Hath any man seen him at the barber's?

82

III,2,1244

Nay, a' rubs himself with civet: can you smell him
out by that?

83

III,2,1247

The greatest note of it is his melancholy.

84

III,2,1249

Yea, or to paint himself? for the which, I hear
what they say of him.

85

III,2,1253

Indeed, that tells a heavy tale for him: conclude,
conclude he is in love.

86

III,2,1256

That would I know too: I warrant, one that knows him not.

87

III,2,1259

She shall be buried with her face upwards.

88

III,2,1265

For my life, to break with him about Beatrice.

89

III,2,1271

Good den, brother.

90

III,2,1273

In private?

91

III,2,1276

What's the matter?

92

III,2,1279

You know he does.

93

III,2,1288

Why, what's the matter?

94

III,2,1293

Even she; Leonato's Hero, your Hero, every man's Hero:

95

III,2,1304

I will not think it.

96

III,2,1312

And, as I wooed for thee to obtain her, I will join
with thee to disgrace her.

97

III,2,1317

O day untowardly turned!

98

IV,1,1669

Nothing, unless you render her again.

99

IV,1,1705

What should I speak?
I stand dishonour'd, that have gone about
To link my dear friend to a common stale.

100

IV,1,1731

Why, then are you no maiden. Leonato,
I am sorry you must hear: upon mine honour,
Myself, my brother and this grieved count
Did see her, hear her, at that hour last night
Talk with a ruffian at her chamber-window
Who hath indeed, most like a liberal villain,
Confess'd the vile encounters they have had
A thousand times in secret.

101

V,1,2115

Good den, good den.

102

V,1,2118

We have some haste, Leonato.

103

V,1,2121

Nay, do not quarrel with us, good old man.

104

V,1,2147

You say not right, old man.

105

V,1,2179

Gentlemen both, we will not wake your patience.
My heart is sorry for your daughter's death:
But, on my honour, she was charged with nothing
But what was true and very full of proof.

106

V,1,2184

I will not hear you.

107

V,1,2188

See, see; here comes the man we went to seek.

108

V,1,2192

Welcome, signior: you are almost come to part
almost a fray.

109

V,1,2196

Leonato and his brother. What thinkest thou? Had
we fought, I doubt we should have been too young for them.

110

V,1,2204

Dost thou wear thy wit by thy side?

111

V,1,2208

As I am an honest man, he looks pale. Art thou
sick, or angry?

112

V,1,2216

By this light, he changes more and more: I think
he be angry indeed.

113

V,1,2228

What, a feast, a feast?

114

V,1,2234

I'll tell thee how Beatrice praised thy wit the
other day. I said, thou hadst a fine wit: 'True,'
said she, 'a fine little one.' 'No,' said I, 'a
great wit:' 'Right,' says she, 'a great gross one.'
'Nay,' said I, 'a good wit:' 'Just,' said she, 'it
hurts nobody.' 'Nay,' said I, 'the gentleman
is wise:' 'Certain,' said she, 'a wise gentleman.'
'Nay,' said I, 'he hath the tongues:' 'That I
believe,' said she, 'for he swore a thing to me on
Monday night, which he forswore on Tuesday morning;
there's a double tongue; there's two tongues.' Thus
did she, an hour together, transshape thy particular
virtues: yet at last she concluded with a sigh, thou
wast the properest man in Italy.

115

V,1,2250

Yea, that she did: but yet, for all that, an if she
did not hate him deadly, she would love him dearly:
the old man's daughter told us all.

116

V,1,2255

But when shall we set the savage bull's horns on
the sensible Benedick's head?

117

V,1,2269

He is in earnest.

118

V,1,2272

And hath challenged thee.

119

V,1,2274

What a pretty thing man is when he goes in his
doublet and hose and leaves off his wit!

120

V,1,2278

But, soft you, let me be: pluck up, my heart, and
be sad. Did he not say, my brother was fled?

121

V,1,2284

How now? two of my brother's men bound! Borachio
one!

122

V,1,2287

Officers, what offence have these men done?

123

V,1,2293

First, I ask thee what they have done; thirdly, I
ask thee what's their offence; sixth and lastly, why
they are committed; and, to conclude, what you lay
to their charge.

124

V,1,2299

Who have you offended, masters, that you are thus
bound to your answer? this learned constable is
too cunning to be understood: what's your offence?

125

V,1,2316

Runs not this speech like iron through your blood?

126

V,1,2318

But did my brother set thee on to this?

127

V,1,2320

He is composed and framed of treachery:
And fled he is upon this villany.

128

V,1,2349

By my soul, nor I:
And yet, to satisfy this good old man,
I would bend under any heavy weight
That he'll enjoin me to.

129

V,1,2404

We will not fail.

130

V,3,2532

Good morrow, masters; put your torches out:
The wolves have prey'd; and look, the gentle day,
Before the wheels of Phoebus, round about
Dapples the drowsy east with spots of grey.
Thanks to you all, and leave us: fare you well.

131

V,3,2538

Come, let us hence, and put on other weeds;
And then to Leonato's we will go.

132

V,4,2581

Good morrow to this fair assembly.

133

V,4,2588

Good morrow, Benedick. Why, what's the matter,
That you have such a February face,
So full of frost, of storm and cloudiness?

134

V,4,2616

The former Hero! Hero that is dead!

135

V,4,2653

How dost thou, Benedick, the married man?

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