Speeches (Lines) for Don John
in "Much Ado about Nothing"

Total: 40

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,141

I thank you: I am not of many words, but I thank
you.

2

I,3,332

There is no measure in the occasion that breeds;
therefore the sadness is without limit.

3

I,3,335

And when I have heard it, what blessing brings it?

4

I,3,338

I wonder that thou, being, as thou sayest thou art,
born under Saturn, goest about to apply a moral
medicine to a mortifying mischief. I cannot hide
what I am: I must be sad when I have cause and smile
at no man's jests, eat when I have stomach and wait
for no man's leisure, sleep when I am drowsy and
tend on no man's business, laugh when I am merry and
claw no man in his humour.

5

I,3,353

I had rather be a canker in a hedge than a rose in
his grace, and it better fits my blood to be
disdained of all than to fashion a carriage to rob
love from any: in this, though I cannot be said to
be a flattering honest man, it must not be denied
but I am a plain-dealing villain. I am trusted with
a muzzle and enfranchised with a clog; therefore I
have decreed not to sing in my cage. If I had my
mouth, I would bite; if I had my liberty, I would do
my liking: in the meantime let me be that I am and
seek not to alter me.

6

I,3,365

I make all use of it, for I use it only.
Who comes here?
[Enter BORACHIO]
What news, Borachio?

7

I,3,372

Will it serve for any model to build mischief on?
What is he for a fool that betroths himself to
unquietness?

8

I,3,376

Who? the most exquisite Claudio?

9

I,3,378

A proper squire! And who, and who? which way looks
he?

10

I,3,381

A very forward March-chick! How came you to this?

11

I,3,388

Come, come, let us thither: this may prove food to
my displeasure. That young start-up hath all the
glory of my overthrow: if I can cross him any way, I
bless myself every way. You are both sure, and will assist me?

12

I,3,393

Let us to the great supper: their cheer is the
greater that I am subdued. Would the cook were of
my mind! Shall we go prove what's to be done?

13

II,1,541

Sure my brother is amorous on Hero and hath
withdrawn her father to break with him about it.
The ladies follow her and but one visor remains.

14

II,1,545

Are not you Signior Benedick?

15

II,1,547

Signior, you are very near my brother in his love:
he is enamoured on Hero; I pray you, dissuade him
from her: she is no equal for his birth: you may
do the part of an honest man in it.

16

II,1,552

I heard him swear his affection.

17

II,1,554

Come, let us to the banquet.

18

II,2,761

It is so; the Count Claudio shall marry the
daughter of Leonato.

19

II,2,764

Any bar, any cross, any impediment will be
medicinable to me: I am sick in displeasure to him,
and whatsoever comes athwart his affection ranges
evenly with mine. How canst thou cross this marriage?

20

II,2,770

Show me briefly how.

21

II,2,774

I remember.

22

II,2,777

What life is in that, to be the death of this marriage?

23

II,2,783

What proof shall I make of that?

24

II,2,787

Only to despite them, I will endeavour any thing.

25

II,2,805

Grow this to what adverse issue it can, I will put
it in practise. Be cunning in the working this, and
thy fee is a thousand ducats.

26

II,2,810

I will presently go learn their day of marriage.

27

III,2,1270

My lord and brother, God save you!

28

III,2,1272

If your leisure served, I would speak with you.

29

III,2,1274

If it please you: yet Count Claudio may hear; for
what I would speak of concerns him.

30

III,2,1277

[To CLAUDIO] Means your lordship to be married
to-morrow?

31

III,2,1280

I know not that, when he knows what I know.

32

III,2,1282

You may think I love you not: let that appear
hereafter, and aim better at me by that I now will
manifest. For my brother, I think he holds you
well, and in dearness of heart hath holp to effect
your ensuing marriage;—surely suit ill spent and
labour ill bestowed.

33

III,2,1289

I came hither to tell you; and, circumstances
shortened, for she has been too long a talking of,
the lady is disloyal.

34

III,2,1295

The word is too good to paint out her wickedness; I
could say she were worse: think you of a worse
title, and I will fit her to it. Wonder not till
further warrant: go but with me to-night, you shall
see her chamber-window entered, even the night
before her wedding-day: if you love her then,
to-morrow wed her; but it would better fit your honour
to change your mind.

35

III,2,1305

If you dare not trust that you see, confess not
that you know: if you will follow me, I will show
you enough; and when you have seen more and heard
more, proceed accordingly.

36

III,2,1314

I will disparage her no farther till you are my
witnesses: bear it coldly but till midnight, and
let the issue show itself.

37

III,2,1319

O plague right well prevented! so will you say when
you have seen the sequel.

38

IV,1,1709

Sir, they are spoken, and these things are true.

39

IV,1,1739

Fie, fie! they are not to be named, my lord,
Not to be spoke of;
There is not chastity enough in language
Without offence to utter them. Thus, pretty lady,
I am sorry for thy much misgovernment.

40

IV,1,1756

Come, let us go. These things, come thus to light,
Smother her spirits up.

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