Speeches (Lines) for Cymbeline
in "Cymbeline"

Total: 81

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,157

Thou basest thing, avoid! hence, from my sight!
If after this command thou fraught the court
With thy unworthiness, thou diest: away!
Thou'rt poison to my blood.

2

I,1,166

O disloyal thing,
That shouldst repair my youth, thou heap'st
A year's age on me.

3

I,1,173

Past grace? obedience?

4

I,1,175

That mightst have had the sole son of my queen!

5

I,1,178

Thou took'st a beggar; wouldst have made my throne
A seat for baseness.

6

I,1,182

O thou vile one!

7

I,1,188

What, art thou mad?

8

I,1,192

Thou foolish thing!
[Re-enter QUEEN]
They were again together: you have done
Not after our command. Away with her,
And pen her up.

9

I,1,201

Nay, let her languish
A drop of blood a day; and, being aged,
Die of this folly!

10

II,3,1018

Attend you here the door of our stern daughter?
Will she not forth?

11

II,3,1021

The exile of her minion is too new;
She hath not yet forgot him: some more time
Must wear the print of his remembrance out,
And then she's yours.

12

II,3,1039

A worthy fellow,
Albeit he comes on angry purpose now;
But that's no fault of his: we must receive him
According to the honour of his sender;
And towards himself, his goodness forespent on us,
We must extend our notice. Our dear son,
When you have given good morning to your mistress,
Attend the queen and us; we shall have need
To employ you towards this Roman. Come, our queen.

13

III,1,1411

Now say, what would Augustus Caesar with us?

14

III,1,1451

Son, let your mother end.

15

III,1,1458

You must know,
Till the injurious Romans did extort
This tribute from us, we were free:
Caesar's ambition,
Which swell'd so much that it did almost stretch
The sides o' the world, against all colour here
Did put the yoke upon 's; which to shake off
Becomes a warlike people, whom we reckon
Ourselves to be.

16

III,1,1468

Say, then, to Caesar,
Our ancestor was that Mulmutius which
Ordain'd our laws, whose use the sword of Caesar
Hath too much mangled; whose repair and franchise
Shall, by the power we hold, be our good deed,
Though Rome be therefore angry: Mulmutius made our laws,
Who was the first of Britain which did put
His brows within a golden crown and call'd
Himself a king.

17

III,1,1485

Thou art welcome, Caius.
Thy Caesar knighted me; my youth I spent
Much under him; of him I gather'd honour;
Which he to seek of me again, perforce,
Behoves me keep at utterance. I am perfect
That the Pannonians and Dalmatians for
Their liberties are now in arms; a precedent
Which not to read would show the Britons cold:
So Caesar shall not find them.

18

III,1,1503

I know your master's pleasure and he mine:
All the remain is 'Welcome!'

19

III,5,1944

Thus far; and so farewell.

20

III,5,1949

Our subjects, sir,
Will not endure his yoke; and for ourself
To show less sovereignty than they, must needs
Appear unkinglike.

21

III,5,1957

My lords, you are appointed for that office;
The due of honour in no point omit.
So farewell, noble Lucius.

22

III,5,1965

Leave not the worthy Lucius, good my lords,
Till he have cross'd the Severn. Happiness!

23

III,5,1972

Lucius hath wrote already to the emperor
How it goes here. It fits us therefore ripely
Our chariots and our horsemen be in readiness:
The powers that he already hath in Gallia
Will soon be drawn to head, from whence he moves
His war for Britain.

24

III,5,1980

Our expectation that it would be thus
Hath made us forward. But, my gentle queen,
Where is our daughter? She hath not appear'd
Before the Roman, nor to us hath tender'd
The duty of the day: she looks us like
A thing more made of malice than of duty:
We have noted it. Call her before us; for
We have been too slight in sufferance.

25

III,5,1997

Where is she, sir? How
Can her contempt be answer'd?

26

III,5,2009

Her doors lock'd?
Not seen of late? Grant, heavens, that which I fear
Prove false!

27

IV,3,2825

Again; and bring me word how 'tis with her.
[Exit an Attendant]
A fever with the absence of her son,
A madness, of which her life's in danger. Heavens,
How deeply you at once do touch me! Imogen,
The great part of my comfort, gone; my queen
Upon a desperate bed, and in a time
When fearful wars point at me; her son gone,
So needful for this present: it strikes me, past
The hope of comfort. But for thee, fellow,
Who needs must know of her departure and
Dost seem so ignorant, we'll enforce it from thee
By a sharp torture.

28

IV,3,2849

The time is troublesome.
[To PISANIO]
We'll slip you for a season; but our jealousy
Does yet depend.

29

IV,3,2857

Now for the counsel of my son and queen!
I am amazed with matter.

30

IV,3,2865

I thank you. Let's withdraw;
And meet the time as it seeks us. We fear not
What can from Italy annoy us; but
We grieve at chances here. Away!

31

V,5,3365

Stand by my side, you whom the gods have made
Preservers of my throne. Woe is my heart
That the poor soldier that so richly fought,
Whose rags shamed gilded arms, whose naked breast
Stepp'd before larges of proof, cannot be found:
He shall be happy that can find him, if
Our grace can make him so.

32

V,5,3376

No tidings of him?

33

V,5,3379

To my grief, I am
The heir of his reward;
[To BELARIUS, GUIDERIUS, and ARVIRAGUS]
which I will add
To you, the liver, heart and brain of Britain,
By whom I grant she lives. 'Tis now the time
To ask of whence you are. Report it.

34

V,5,3390

Bow your knees.
Arise my knights o' the battle: I create you
Companions to our person and will fit you
With dignities becoming your estates.
[Enter CORNELIUS and Ladies]
There's business in these faces. Why so sadly
Greet you our victory? you look like Romans,
And not o' the court of Britain.

35

V,5,3401

Who worse than a physician
Would this report become? But I consider,
By medicine life may be prolong'd, yet death
Will seize the doctor too. How ended she?

36

V,5,3411

Prithee, say.

37

V,5,3416

She alone knew this;
And, but she spoke it dying, I would not
Believe her lips in opening it. Proceed.

38

V,5,3424

O most delicate fiend!
Who is 't can read a woman? Is there more?

39

V,5,3439

Heard you all this, her women?

40

V,5,3441

Mine eyes
Were not in fault, for she was beautiful;
Mine ears, that heard her flattery; nor my heart,
That thought her like her seeming; it had
been vicious
To have mistrusted her: yet, O my daughter!
That it was folly in me, thou mayst say,
And prove it in thy feeling. Heaven mend all!
[Enter LUCIUS, IACHIMO, the Soothsayer, and other]
Roman Prisoners, guarded; POSTHUMUS LEONATUS
behind, and IMOGEN]
Thou comest not, Caius, now for tribute that
The Britons have razed out, though with the loss
Of many a bold one; whose kinsmen have made suit
That their good souls may be appeased with slaughter
Of you their captives, which ourself have granted:
So think of your estate.

41

V,5,3477

I have surely seen him:
His favour is familiar to me. Boy,
Thou hast look'd thyself into my grace,
And art mine own. I know not why, wherefore,
To say 'live, boy:' ne'er thank thy master; live:
And ask of Cymbeline what boon thou wilt,
Fitting my bounty and thy state, I'll give it;
Yea, though thou do demand a prisoner,
The noblest ta'en.

42

V,5,3497

What wouldst thou, boy?
I love thee more and more: think more and more
What's best to ask. Know'st him thou look'st on? speak,
Wilt have him live? Is he thy kin? thy friend?

43

V,5,3504

Wherefore eyest him so?

44

V,5,3507

Ay, with all my heart,
And lend my best attention. What's thy name?

45

V,5,3510

Thou'rt my good youth, my page;
I'll be thy master: walk with me; speak freely.

46

V,5,3527

Come, stand thou by our side;
Make thy demand aloud.
[To IACHIMO]
Sir, step you forth;
Give answer to this boy, and do it freely;
Or, by our greatness and the grace of it,
Which is our honour, bitter torture shall
Winnow the truth from falsehood. On, speak to him.

47

V,5,3538

That diamond upon your finger, say
How came it yours?

48

V,5,3542

How! me?

49

V,5,3550

All that belongs to this.

50

V,5,3554

My daughter! what of her? Renew thy strength:
I had rather thou shouldst live while nature will
Than die ere I hear more: strive, man, and speak.

51

V,5,3573

I stand on fire:
Come to the matter.

52

V,5,3586

Nay, nay, to the purpose.

53

V,5,3645

Does the world go round?

54

V,5,3648

If this be so, the gods do mean to strike me
To death with mortal joy.

55

V,5,3654

The tune of Imogen!

56

V,5,3659

New matter still?

57

V,5,3667

What's this, Comelius?

58

V,5,3688

How now, my flesh, my child!
What, makest thou me a dullard in this act?
Wilt thou not speak to me?

59

V,5,3695

My tears that fall
Prove holy water on thee! Imogen,
Thy mother's dead.

60

V,5,3699

O, she was nought; and long of her it was
That we meet here so strangely: but her son
Is gone, we know not how nor where.

61

V,5,3718

Marry, the gods forfend!
I would not thy good deeds should from my lips
Pluck a bard sentence: prithee, valiant youth,
Deny't again.

62

V,5,3723

He was a prince.

63

V,5,3730

I am sorry for thee:
By thine own tongue thou art condemn'd, and must
Endure our law: thou'rt dead.

64

V,5,3735

Bind the offender,
And take him from our presence.

65

V,5,3745

Why, old soldier,
Wilt thou undo the worth thou art unpaid for,
By tasting of our wrath? How of descent
As good as we?

66

V,5,3750

And thou shalt die for't.

67

V,5,3761

What of him? he is
A banish'd traitor.

68

V,5,3766

Take him hence:
The whole world shall not save him.

69

V,5,3772

Nursing of my sons!

70

V,5,3780

How! my issue!

71

V,5,3802

Thou weep'st, and speak'st.
The service that you three have done is more
Unlike than this thou tell'st. I lost my children:
If these be they, I know not how to wish
A pair of worthier sons.

72

V,5,3815

Guiderius had
Upon his neck a mole, a sanguine star;
It was a mark of wonder.

73

V,5,3822

O, what, am I
A mother to the birth of three? Ne'er mother
Rejoiced deliverance more. Blest pray you be,
That, after this strange starting from your orbs,
may reign in them now! O Imogen,
Thou hast lost by this a kingdom.

74

V,5,3834

Did you e'er meet?

75

V,5,3839

O rare instinct!
When shall I hear all through? This fierce
abridgement
Hath to it circumstantial branches, which
Distinction should be rich in. Where? how lived You?
And when came you to serve our Roman captive?
How parted with your brothers? how first met them?
Why fled you from the court? and whither? These,
And your three motives to the battle, with
I know not how much more, should be demanded;
And all the other by-dependencies,
From chance to chance: but nor the time nor place
Will serve our long inter'gatories. See,
Posthumus anchors upon Imogen,
And she, like harmless lightning, throws her eye
On him, her brother, me, her master, hitting
Each object with a joy: the counterchange
Is severally in all. Let's quit this ground,
And smoke the temple with our sacrifices.
[To BELARIUS]
Thou art my brother; so we'll hold thee ever.

76

V,5,3862

All o'erjoy'd,
Save these in bonds: let them be joyful too,
For they shall taste our comfort.

77

V,5,3868

The forlorn soldier, that so nobly fought,
He would have well becomed this place, and graced
The thankings of a king.

78

V,5,3887

Nobly doom'd!
We'll learn our freeness of a son-in-law;
Pardon's the word to all.

79

V,5,3924

This hath some seeming.

80

V,5,3931

Well
My peace we will begin. And, Caius Lucius,
Although the victor, we submit to Caesar,
And to the Roman empire; promising
To pay our wonted tribute, from the which
We were dissuaded by our wicked queen;
Whom heavens, in justice, both on her and hers,
Have laid most heavy hand.

81

V,5,3950

Laud we the gods;
And let our crooked smokes climb to their nostrils
From our blest altars. Publish we this peace
To all our subjects. Set we forward: let
A Roman and a British ensign wave
Friendly together: so through Lud's-town march:
And in the temple of great Jupiter
Our peace we'll ratify; seal it with feasts.
Set on there! Never was a war did cease,
Ere bloody hands were wash'd, with such a peace.

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