Speeches (Lines) for Coriolanus
in "Coriolanus"

Total: 189

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,164

Thanks. What's the matter, you dissentious rogues,
That, rubbing the poor itch of your opinion,...

2

I,1,168

He that will give good words to thee will flatter
Beneath abhorring. What would you have, you curs,...

3

I,1,193

Hang 'em! They say!
They'll sit by the fire, and presume to know...

4

I,1,210

They are dissolved: hang 'em!
They said they were an-hungry; sigh'd forth proverbs,...

5

I,1,222

Five tribunes to defend their vulgar wisdoms,
Of their own choice: one's Junius Brutus,...

6

I,1,230

Go, get you home, you fragments!

7

I,1,233

Here: what's the matter?

8

I,1,235

I am glad on 't: then we shall ha' means to vent
Our musty superfluity. See, our best elders....

9

I,1,241

They have a leader,
Tullus Aufidius, that will put you to 't....

10

I,1,247

Were half to half the world by the ears and he.
Upon my party, I'ld revolt to make...

11

I,1,254

Sir, it is;
And I am constant. Titus TITUS, thou...

12

I,1,269

Nay, let them follow:
The Volsces have much corn; take these rats thither...

13

I,4,479

Yonder comes news. A wager they have met.

14

I,4,481

'Tis done.

15

I,4,483

Say, has our general met the enemy?

16

I,4,486

I'll buy him of you.

17

I,4,489

How far off lie these armies?

18

I,4,491

Then shall we hear their 'larum, and they ours.
Now, Mars, I prithee, make us quick in work,...

19

I,4,510

O, they are at it!

20

I,4,513

They fear us not, but issue forth their city.
Now put your shields before your hearts, and fight...

21

I,4,523

All the contagion of the south light on you,
You shames of Rome! you herd of—Boils and plagues...

22

I,5,576

See here these movers that do prize their hours
At a crack'd drachm! Cushions, leaden spoons,...

23

I,5,590

Sir, praise me not;
My work hath yet not warm'd me: fare you well:...

24

I,5,599

Thy friend no less
Than those she placeth highest! So, farewell.

25

I,6,641

[Within] Come I too late?

26

I,6,646

Come I too late?

27

I,6,649

O, let me clip ye
In arms as sound as when I woo'd, in heart...

28

I,6,655

As with a man busied about decrees:
Condemning some to death, and some to exile;...

29

I,6,664

Let him alone;
He did inform the truth: but for our gentlemen,...

30

I,6,670

Will the time serve to tell? I do not think.
Where is the enemy? are you lords o' the field?...

31

I,6,676

How lies their battle? know you on which side
They have placed their men of trust?

32

I,6,682

I do beseech you,
By all the battles wherein we have fought,...

33

I,6,695

Those are they
That most are willing. If any such be here—...

34

I,8,737

I'll fight with none but thee; for I do hate thee
Worse than a promise-breaker.

35

I,8,742

Let the first budger die the other's slave,
And the gods doom him after!

36

I,8,746

Within these three hours, Tullus,
Alone I fought in your Corioli walls,...

37

I,9,780

Pray now, no more: my mother,
Who has a charter to extol her blood,...

38

I,9,796

I have some wounds upon me, and they smart
To hear themselves remember'd.

39

I,9,806

I thank you, general;
But cannot make my heart consent to take...

40

I,9,814

May these same instruments, which you profane,
Never sound more! when drums and trumpets shall...

41

I,9,843

I will go wash;
And when my face is fair, you shall perceive...

42

I,9,856

The gods begin to mock me. I, that now
Refused most princely gifts, am bound to beg...

43

I,9,860

I sometime lay here in Corioli
At a poor man's house; he used me kindly:...

44

I,9,870

By Jupiter! forgot.
I am weary; yea, my memory is tired....

45

II,1,1091

No more of this; it does offend my heart:
Pray now, no more.

46

II,1,1094

O,
You have, I know, petition'd all the gods...

47

II,1,1103

My gracious silence, hail!
Wouldst thou have laugh'd had I come coffin'd home,...

48

II,1,1109

And live you yet?
[To VALERIA]...

49

II,1,1125

Menenius ever, ever.

50

II,1,1127

[To VOLUMNIA and VIRGILIA] Your hand, and yours:
Ere in our own house I do shade my head,...

51

II,1,1137

Know, good mother,
I had rather be their servant in my way,...

52

II,2,1309

Your horror's pardon:
I had rather have my wounds to heal again...

53

II,2,1314

No, sir: yet oft,
When blows have made me stay, I fled from words....

54

II,2,1320

I had rather have one scratch my head i' the sun
When the alarum were struck than idly sit...

55

II,2,1386

I do owe them still
My life and services.

56

II,2,1390

I do beseech you,
Let me o'erleap that custom, for I cannot...

57

II,2,1402

It is apart
That I shall blush in acting, and might well...

58

II,2,1406

To brag unto them, thus I did, and thus;
Show them the unaching scars which I should hide,...

59

II,3,1475

What must I say?
'I Pray, sir'—Plague upon't! I cannot bring...

60

II,3,1484

Think upon me! hang 'em!
I would they would forget me, like the virtues...

61

II,3,1491

Bid them wash their faces
And keep their teeth clean....

62

II,3,1498

Mine own desert.

63

II,3,1500

Ay, but not mine own desire.

64

II,3,1502

No, sir,'twas never my desire yet to trouble the
poor with begging.

65

II,3,1506

Well then, I pray, your price o' the consulship?

66

II,3,1508

Kindly! Sir, I pray, let me ha't: I have wounds to
show you, which shall be yours in private. Your...

67

II,3,1512

A match, sir. There's in all two worthy voices
begged. I have your alms: adieu.

68

II,3,1518

Pray you now, if it may stand with the tune of your
voices that I may be consul, I have here the...

69

II,3,1523

Your enigma?

70

II,3,1527

You should account me the more virtuous that I have
not been common in my love. I will, sir, flatter my...

71

II,3,1541

I will not seal your knowledge with showing them. I
will make much of your voices, and so trouble you no further.

72

II,3,1545

Most sweet voices!
Better it is to die, better to starve,...

73

II,3,1572

Worthy voices!

74

II,3,1578

Is this done?

75

II,3,1582

Where? at the senate-house?

76

II,3,1584

May I change these garments?

77

II,3,1586

That I'll straight do; and, knowing myself again,
Repair to the senate-house.

78

III,1,1726

Tullus Aufidius then had made new head?

79

III,1,1729

So then the Volsces stand but as at first,
Ready, when time shall prompt them, to make road....

80

III,1,1735

Saw you Aufidius?

81

III,1,1739

Spoke he of me?

82

III,1,1741

How? what?

83

III,1,1747

At Antium lives he?

84

III,1,1749

I wish I had a cause to seek him there,
To oppose his hatred fully. Welcome home....

85

III,1,1757

Ha! what is that?

86

III,1,1759

What makes this change?

87

III,1,1763

Have I had children's voices?

88

III,1,1768

Are these your herd?
Must these have voices, that can yield them now...

89

III,1,1775

It is a purposed thing, and grows by plot,
To curb the will of the nobility:...

90

III,1,1784

Why, this was known before.

91

III,1,1786

Have you inform'd them sithence?

92

III,1,1788

You are like to do such business.

93

III,1,1791

Why then should I be consul? By yond clouds,
Let me deserve so ill as you, and make me...

94

III,1,1805

Tell me of corn!
This was my speech, and I will speak't again—

95

III,1,1809

Now, as I live, I will. My nobler friends,
I crave their pardons:...

96

III,1,1823

How! no more!
As for my country I have shed my blood,...

97

III,1,1835

Choler!
Were I as patient as the midnight sleep,...

98

III,1,1841

Shall remain!
Hear you this Triton of the minnows? mark you...

99

III,1,1845

'Shall'!
O good but most unwise patricians! why,...

100

III,1,1869

Whoever gave that counsel, to give forth
The corn o' the storehouse gratis, as 'twas used...

101

III,1,1873

Though there the people had more absolute power,
I say, they nourish'd disobedience, fed...

102

III,1,1878

I'll give my reasons,
More worthier than their voices. They know the corn...

103

III,1,1901

No, take more:
What may be sworn by, both divine and human,...

104

III,1,1927

Thou wretch, despite o'erwhelm thee!
What should the people do with these bald tribunes?...

105

III,1,1946

Hence, old goat!

106

III,1,1949

Hence, rotten thing! or I shall shake thy bones
Out of thy garments.

107

III,1,2008

No, I'll die here.
[Drawing his sword]...

108

III,1,2031

I would they were barbarians—as they are,
Though in Rome litter'd—not Romans—as they are not,...

109

III,1,2037

On fair ground
I could beat forty of them.

110

III,2,2163

Let them puff all about mine ears, present me
Death on the wheel or at wild horses' heels,...

111

III,2,2170

I muse my mother
Does not approve me further, who was wont...

112

III,2,2185

Let go.

113

III,2,2191

Let them hang.

114

III,2,2209

What must I do?

115

III,2,2211

Well, what then? what then?

116

III,2,2213

For them! I cannot do it to the gods;
Must I then do't to them?

117

III,2,2222

Tush, tush!

118

III,2,2230

Why force you this?

119

III,2,2285

Must I go show them my unbarbed sconce?
Must I with base tongue give my noble heart...

120

III,2,2298

Well, I must do't:
Away, my disposition, and possess me...

121

III,2,2320

Pray, be content:
Mother, I am going to the market-place;...

122

III,2,2334

The word is 'mildly.' Pray you, let us go:
Let them accuse me by invention, I...

123

III,2,2338

Well, mildly be it then. Mildly!

124

III,3,2385

Ay, as an ostler, that for the poorest piece
Will bear the knave by the volume. The honour'd gods...

125

III,3,2396

First, hear me speak.

126

III,3,2398

Shall I be charged no further than this present?
Must all determine here?

127

III,3,2405

I am content.

128

III,3,2410

Scratches with briers,
Scars to move laughter only.

129

III,3,2419

What is the matter
That being pass'd for consul with full voice,...

130

III,3,2424

Say, then: 'tis true, I ought so.

131

III,3,2429

How! traitor!

132

III,3,2431

The fires i' the lowest hell fold-in the people!
Call me their traitor! Thou injurious tribune!...

133

III,3,2450

What do you prate of service?

134

III,3,2452

You?

135

III,3,2455

I know no further:
Let them pronounce the steep Tarpeian death,...

136

III,3,2492

You common cry of curs! whose breath I hate
As reek o' the rotten fens, whose loves I prize...

137

IV,3,2522

Come, leave your tears: a brief farewell: the beast
With many heads butts me away. Nay, mother,...

138

IV,3,2534

Nay! prithee, woman,—

139

IV,3,2537

What, what, what!
I shall be loved when I am lack'd. Nay, mother....

140

IV,3,2562

O the gods!

141

IV,3,2570

Fare ye well:
Thou hast years upon thee; and thou art too full...

142

IV,3,2585

Give me thy hand: Come.

143

IV,4,2716

A goodly city is this Antium. City,
'Tis I that made thy widows: many an heir...

144

IV,4,2725

Direct me, if it be your will,
Where great Aufidius lies: is he in Antium?

145

IV,4,2729

Which is his house, beseech you?

146

IV,4,2731

Thank you, sir: farewell.
[Exit Citizen]...

147

IV,5,2758

A goodly house: the feast smells well; but I
Appear not like a guest.

148

IV,5,2764

I have deserved no better entertainment,
In being Coriolanus.

149

IV,5,2770

Away!

150

IV,5,2772

Now thou'rt troublesome.

151

IV,5,2781

Let me but stand; I will not hurt your hearth.

152

IV,5,2783

A gentleman.

153

IV,5,2785

True, so I am.

154

IV,5,2788

Follow your function, go, and batten on cold bits.

155

IV,5,2795

Under the canopy.

156

IV,5,2797

Ay.

157

IV,5,2799

I' the city of kites and crows.

158

IV,5,2802

No, I serve not thy master.

159

IV,5,2804

Ay; 'tis an honester service than to meddle with thy
mistress. Thou pratest, and pratest; serve with thy...

160

IV,5,2815

If, Tullus,
[Unmuffling]...

161

IV,5,2821

A name unmusical to the Volscians' ears,
And harsh in sound to thine.

162

IV,5,2827

Prepare thy brow to frown: know'st
thou me yet?

163

IV,5,2830

My name is Caius CORIOLANUS, who hath done
To thee particularly and to all the Volsces...

164

IV,5,2903

You bless me, gods!

165

V,2,3432

What's the matter?

166

V,2,3454

Away!

167

V,2,3456

Wife, mother, child, I know not. My affairs
Are servanted to others: though I owe...

168

V,3,3490

We will before the walls of Rome tomorrow
Set down our host. My partner in this action,...

169

V,3,3499

This last old man,
Whom with a crack'd heart I have sent to Rome,...

170

V,3,3533

These eyes are not the same I wore in Rome.

171

V,3,3536

Like a dull actor now,
I have forgot my part, and I am out,...

172

V,3,3556

What is this?
Your knees to me? to your corrected son?...

173

V,3,3565

The noble sister of Publicola,
The moon of Rome, chaste as the icicle...

174

V,3,3572

The god of soldiers,
With the consent of supreme Jove, inform...

175

V,3,3579

That's my brave boy!

176

V,3,3582

I beseech you, peace:
Or, if you'ld ask, remember this before:...

177

V,3,3597

Aufidius, and you Volsces, mark; for we'll
Hear nought from Rome in private. Your request?

178

V,3,3638

Not of a woman's tenderness to be,
Requires nor child nor woman's face to see....

179

V,3,3695

O mother, mother!
What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope,...

180

V,3,3708

I dare be sworn you were:
And, sir, it is no little thing to make...

181

V,3,3719

Ay, by and by;
[To VOLUMNIA, VIRGILIA, &c]...

182

V,6,3907

Hail, lords! I am return'd your soldier,
No more infected with my country's love...

183

V,6,3924

Traitor! how now!

184

V,6,3926

CORIOLANUS!

185

V,6,3940

Hear'st thou, Mars?

186

V,6,3942

Ha!

187

V,6,3944

Measureless liar, thou hast made my heart
Too great for what contains it. Boy! O slave!...

188

V,6,3953

Cut me to pieces, Volsces; men and lads,
Stain all your edges on me. Boy! false hound!...

189

V,6,3972

O that I had him,
With six Aufidiuses, or more, his tribe,...

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