Speeches (Lines) for Cominius
in "Coriolanus"

Total: 67

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,246

You have fought together.

2

I,1,253

It is your former promise.

3

I,1,267

Noble CORIOLANUS!

4

I,6,609

Breathe you, my friends: well fought;
we are come off...

5

I,6,626

Though thou speak'st truth,
Methinks thou speak'st not well....

6

I,6,630

'Tis not a mile; briefly we heard their drums:
How couldst thou in a mile confound an hour,...

7

I,6,637

Who's yonder,
That does appear as he were flay'd? O gods...

8

I,6,642

The shepherd knows not thunder from a tabour
More than I know the sound of CORIOLANUS' tongue...

9

I,6,647

Ay, if you come not in the blood of others,
But mantled in your own.

10

I,6,653

Flower of warriors,
How is it with Titus TITUS?

11

I,6,661

Where is that slave
Which told me they had beat you to your trenches?...

12

I,6,669

But how prevail'd you?

13

I,6,673

CORIOLANUS,
We have at disadvantage fought and did...

14

I,6,678

As I guess, CORIOLANUS,
Their bands i' the vaward are the Antiates,...

15

I,6,690

Though I could wish
You were conducted to a gentle bath...

16

I,6,718

March on, my fellows:
Make good this ostentation, and you shall...

17

I,9,763

If I should tell thee o'er this thy day's work,
Thou'ldst not believe thy deeds: but I'll report it...

18

I,9,787

You shall not be
The grave of your deserving; Rome must know...

19

I,9,798

Should they not,
Well might they fester 'gainst ingratitude,...

20

I,9,827

Too modest are you;
More cruel to your good report than grateful...

21

I,9,849

So, to our tent;
Where, ere we do repose us, we will write...

22

I,9,859

Take't; 'tis yours. What is't?

23

I,9,866

O, well begg'd!
Were he the butcher of my son, he should...

24

I,9,873

Go we to our tent:
The blood upon your visage dries; 'tis time...

25

II,1,1093

Look, sir, your mother!

26

II,1,1124

Ever right.

27

II,1,1140

On, to the Capitol!
[Flourish. Cornets. Exeunt in state, as before.]...

28

II,2,1329

I shall lack voice: the deeds of Coriolanus
Should not be utter'd feebly. It is held...

29

II,2,1373

Our spoils he kick'd at,
And look'd upon things precious as they were...

30

III,1,1732

They are worn, lord consul, so,
That we shall hardly in our ages see...

31

III,1,1761

Hath he not pass'd the noble and the common?

32

III,1,1801

The people are abused; set on. This paltering
Becomes not Rome, nor has Coriolanus...

33

III,1,1844

'Twas from the canon.

34

III,1,1868

Well, on to the market-place.

35

III,1,1948

Aged sir, hands off.

36

III,1,1982

That is the way to lay the city flat;
To bring the roof to the foundation,...

37

III,1,2014

Help CORIOLANUS, help,
You that be noble; help him, young and old!

38

III,1,2022

Stand fast;
We have as many friends as enemies.

39

III,1,2030

Come, sir, along with us.

40

III,1,2039

I could myself
Take up a brace o' the best of them; yea, the...

41

III,1,2052

Nay, come away.

42

III,2,2277

I have been i' the market-place; and, sir,'tis fit
You make strong party, or defend yourself...

43

III,2,2281

I think 'twill serve, if he
Can thereto frame his spirit.

44

III,2,2293

Come, come, we'll prompt you.

45

III,2,2330

Away! the tribunes do attend you: arm yourself
To answer mildly; for they are prepared...

46

III,3,2418

Well, well, no more.

47

III,3,2454

Know, I pray you,—

48

III,3,2477

Hear me, my masters, and my common friends,—

49

III,3,2479

Let me speak:
I have been consul, and can show for Rome...

50

IV,3,2563

I'll follow thee a month, devise with thee
Where thou shalt rest, that thou mayst hear of us...

51

IV,6,3114

O, you have made good work!

52

IV,6,3116

You have holp to ravish your own daughters and
To melt the city leads upon your pates,...

53

IV,6,3120

Your temples burned in their cement, and
Your franchises, whereon you stood, confined...

54

IV,6,3126

If!
He is their god: he leads them like a thing...

55

IV,6,3137

He will shake
Your Rome about your ears.

56

IV,6,3143

Ay; and you'll look pale
Before you find it other. All the regions...

57

IV,6,3151

Who shall ask it?
The tribunes cannot do't for shame; the people...

58

IV,6,3163

You have brought
A trembling upon Rome, such as was never...

59

IV,6,3170

But I fear
They'll roar him in again. Tullus Aufidius,...

60

IV,6,3196

Ye re goodly things, you voices!

61

IV,6,3199

O, ay, what else?

62

V,1,3286

He would not seem to know me.

63

V,1,3288

Yet one time he did call me by my name:
I urged our old acquaintance, and the drops...

64

V,1,3298

I minded him how royal 'twas to pardon
When it was less expected: he replied,...

65

V,1,3304

I offer'd to awaken his regard
For's private friends: his answer to me was,...

66

V,1,3352

He'll never hear him.

67

V,1,3354

I tell you, he does sit in gold, his eye
Red as 'twould burn Rome; and his injury...

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