Speeches (Lines) for Lord Chief Justice
in "Henry IV, Part II"

Total: 56

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,353

What's he that goes there?

2

I,2,355

He that was in question for the robb'ry?

3

I,2,360

What, to York? Call him back again.

4

I,2,364

I am sure he is, to the hearing of anything
Go, pluck him by the elbow; I must speak with him.

5

I,2,392

Sir John Falstaff, a word with you.

6

I,2,404

Sir John, I sent for you before your expedition
Shrewsbury.

7

I,2,410

I talk not of his Majesty. You would not come
sent for you.

8

I,2,416

Well God mend him! I pray you let me speak with

9

I,2,423

What tell you me of it? Be it as it is.

10

I,2,428

I think you are fall'n into the disease, for you
hear not what I say to you.

11

I,2,435

To punish you by the heels would amend the
of your ears; and I care not if I do become your physician.

12

I,2,445

I sent for you, when there were matters against
for your life, to come speak with me.

13

I,2,451

Well, the truth is, Sir John, you live in great
infamy.

14

I,2,455

Your means are very slender, and your waste is
great.

15

I,2,460

You have misled the youthful Prince.

16

I,2,464

Well, I am loath to gall a new-heal'd wound.
day's service at Shrewsbury hath a little gilded over your
night's exploit on Gadshill. You may thank th' unquiet time
your quiet o'erposting that action.

17

I,2,471

But since all is well, keep it so: wake not a
sleeping wolf.

18

I,2,474

What! you are as a candle, the better part burnt
out.

19

I,2,479

There is not a white hair in your face but
have his effect of gravity.

20

I,2,483

You follow the young Prince up and down, like
ill angel.

21

I,2,505

Do you set down your name in the scroll of
that are written down old with all the characters of age?
you not a moist eye, a dry hand, a yellow cheek, a white
decreasing leg, an increasing belly? Is not your voice
your wind short, your chin double, your wit single, and every
part about you blasted with antiquity? And will you yet call
yourself young? Fie, fie, fie, Sir John!

22

I,2,534

Well, God send the Prince a better companion!

23

I,2,538

Well, the King hath sever'd you. I hear you are
going with Lord John of Lancaster against the Archbishop and
Earl of Northumberland.

24

I,2,565

Well, be honest, be honest; and God bless your
expedition!

25

I,2,570

Not a penny, not a penny; you are too impatient
bear crosses. Fare you well. Commend me to my cousin
Westmoreland.

26

II,1,786

What is the matter? Keep the peace here, ho!

27

II,1,789

How now, Sir John! what, are you brawling here?
Doth this become your place, your time, and business?
You should have been well on your way to York.
Stand from him, fellow; wherefore hang'st thou upon him?

28

II,1,796

For what sum?

29

II,1,806

How comes this, Sir John? Fie! What man of good
temper would endure this tempest of exclamation? Are you not
ashamed to enforce a poor widow to so rough a course to come
her own?

30

II,1,846

Sir John, Sir John, I am well acquainted with
manner of wrenching the true cause the false way. It is not a
confident brow, nor the throng of words that come with such
than impudent sauciness from you, can thrust me from a level
consideration. You have, as it appears to me, practis'd upon
easy yielding spirit of this woman, and made her serve your
both in purse and in person.

31

II,1,858

Pray thee, peace. Pay her the debt you owe her,
unpay the villainy you have done with her; the one you may do
with sterling money, and the other with current repentance.

32

II,1,871

You speak as having power to do wrong; but
th' effect of your reputation, and satisfy the poor woman.

33

II,1,876

Now, Master Gower, what news?

34

II,1,910

I have heard better news.

35

II,1,912

Where lay the King to-night?

36

II,1,916

Come all his forces back?

37

II,1,921

You shall have letters of me presently.
Come, go along with me, good Master Gower.

38

II,1,924

What's the matter?

39

II,1,929

Sir John, you loiter here too long, being you
take soldiers up in counties as you go.

40

II,1,933

What foolish master taught you these manners,
John?

41

II,1,941

Now, the Lord lighten thee! Thou art a great

42

V,2,3246

How doth the King?

43

V,2,3248

I hope, not dead.

44

V,2,3251

I would his Majesty had call'd me with him.
The service that I truly did his life
Hath left me open to all injuries.

45

V,2,3255

I know he doth not, and do arm myself
To welcome the condition of the time,
Which cannot look more hideously upon me
Than I have drawn it in my fantasy.

46

V,2,3265

O God, I fear all will be overturn'd.

47

V,2,3272

Peace be with us, lest we be heavier!

48

V,2,3282

Sweet Princes, what I did, I did in honour,
Led by th' impartial conduct of my soul;
And never shall you see that I will beg
A ragged and forestall'd remission.
If truth and upright innocency fail me,
I'll to the King my master that is dead,
And tell him who hath sent me after him.

49

V,2,3291

Good morrow, and God save your Majesty!

50

V,2,3313

I am assur'd, if I be measur'd rightly,
Your Majesty hath no just cause to hate me.

51

V,2,3321

I then did use the person of your father;
The image of his power lay then in me;
And in th' administration of his law,
Whiles I was busy for the commonwealth,
Your Highness pleased to forget my place,
The majesty and power of law and justice,
The image of the King whom I presented,
And struck me in my very seat of judgment;
Whereon, as an offender to your father,
I gave bold way to my authority
And did commit you. If the deed were ill,
Be you contented, wearing now the garland,
To have a son set your decrees at nought,
To pluck down justice from your awful bench,
To trip the course of law, and blunt the sword
That guards the peace and safety of your person;
Nay, more, to spurn at your most royal image,
And mock your workings in a second body.
Question your royal thoughts, make the case yours;
Be now the father, and propose a son;
Hear your own dignity so much profan'd,
See your most dreadful laws so loosely slighted,
Behold yourself so by a son disdain'd;
And then imagine me taking your part
And, in your power, soft silencing your son.
After this cold considerance, sentence me;
And, as you are a king, speak in your state
What I have done that misbecame my place,
My person, or my liege's sovereignty.

52

V,5,3637

Have you your wits? Know you what 'tis you

53

V,5,3690

Go, carry Sir John Falstaff to the Fleet;
Take all his company along with him.

54

V,5,3693

I cannot now speak. I will hear you soon.
Take them away.

55

V,5,3702

And so they are.

56

V,5,3704

He hath.

Return to the "Henry IV, Part II" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS