Speeches (Lines) for Celia
in "As You Like It"

Total: 108

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,146

I pray thee, Rosalind, sweet my coz, be merry.

2

I,2,151

Herein I see thou lov'st me not with the full weight that I
love thee. If my uncle, thy banished father, had banished thy...

3

I,2,159

You know my father hath no child but I, nor none is like to
have; and, truly, when he dies thou shalt be his heir; for what...

4

I,2,167

Marry, I prithee, do, to make sport withal; but love no man
in good earnest, nor no further in sport neither than with safety...

5

I,2,171

Let us sit and mock the good housewife Fortune from her
wheel, that her gifts may henceforth be bestowed equally.

6

I,2,176

'Tis true; for those that she makes fair she scarce makes
honest; and those that she makes honest she makes very...

7

I,2,183

No; when Nature hath made a fair creature, may she not by
Fortune fall into the fire? Though Nature hath given us wit to...

8

I,2,189

Peradventure this is not Fortune's work neither, but
Nature's, who perceiveth our natural wits too dull to reason of...

9

I,2,195

Were you made the messenger?

10

I,2,202

How prove you that, in the great heap of your knowledge?

11

I,2,206

By our beards, if we had them, thou art.

12

I,2,212

Prithee, who is't that thou mean'st?

13

I,2,214

My father's love is enough to honour him. Enough, speak no
more of him; you'll be whipt for taxation one of these days.

14

I,2,218

By my troth, thou sayest true; for since the little wit that
fools have was silenced, the little foolery that wise men have...

15

I,2,223

Which he will put on us as pigeons feed their young.

16

I,2,225

All the better; we shall be the more marketable. Bon jour,
Monsieur Le Beau. What's the news?

17

I,2,228

Sport! of what colour?

18

I,2,232

Well said; that was laid on with a trowel.

19

I,2,241

Well, the beginning, that is dead and buried.

20

I,2,243

I could match this beginning with an old tale.

21

I,2,259

Or I, I promise thee.

22

I,2,265

Yonder, sure, they are coming. Let us now stay and see it.

23

I,2,272

Alas, he is too young; yet he looks successfully.

24

I,2,280

Call him hither, good Monsieur Le Beau.

25

I,2,288

Young gentleman, your spirits are too bold for your years.
You have seen cruel proof of this man's strength; if you saw...

26

I,2,308

And mine to eke out hers.

27

I,2,310

Your heart's desires be with you!

28

I,2,320

I would I were invisible, to catch the strong fellow by the
leg. [They wrestle]

29

I,2,323

If I had a thunderbolt in mine eye, I can tell who should
down.

30

I,2,341

Were I my father, coz, would I do this?

31

I,2,350

Gentle cousin,
Let us go thank him, and encourage him;...

32

I,2,361

Ay. Fare you well, fair gentleman.

33

I,2,369

Will you go, coz?

34

I,3,408

Why, cousin! why, Rosalind! Cupid have mercy!
Not a word?

35

I,3,411

No, thy words are too precious to be cast away upon curs;
throw some of them at me; come, lame me with reasons.

36

I,3,415

But is all this for your father?

37

I,3,418

They are but burs, cousin, thrown upon thee in holiday
foolery; if we walk not in the trodden paths, our very petticoats...

38

I,3,423

Hem them away.

39

I,3,425

Come, come, wrestle with thy affections.

40

I,3,427

O, a good wish upon you! You will try in time, in despite of
a fall. But, turning these jests out of service, let us talk in...

41

I,3,432

Doth it therefore ensue that you should love his son dearly?
By this kind of chase I should hate him, for my father hated his...

42

I,3,436

Why should I not? Doth he not deserve well?

43

I,3,440

With his eyes full of anger.

44

I,3,470

Dear sovereign, hear me speak.

45

I,3,473

I did not then entreat to have her stay;
It was your pleasure, and your own remorse;...

46

I,3,489

Pronounce that sentence, then, on me, my liege;
I cannot live out of her company.

47

I,3,495

O my poor Rosalind! Whither wilt thou go?
Wilt thou change fathers? I will give thee mine....

48

I,3,499

Thou hast not, cousin.
Prithee be cheerful. Know'st thou not the Duke...

49

I,3,503

No, hath not? Rosalind lacks, then, the love
Which teacheth thee that thou and I am one....

50

I,3,514

To seek my uncle in the Forest of Arden.

51

I,3,518

I'll put myself in poor and mean attire,
And with a kind of umber smirch my face;...

52

I,3,531

What shall I call thee when thou art a man?

53

I,3,535

Something that hath a reference to my state:
No longer Celia, but Aliena.

54

I,3,540

He'll go along o'er the wide world with me;
Leave me alone to woo him. Let's away,...

55

II,4,729

I pray you bear with me; I cannot go no further.

56

II,4,778

I pray you, one of you question yond man
If he for gold will give us any food;...

57

II,4,812

And we will mend thy wages. I like this place,
And willingly could waste my time in it.

58

III,2,1237

'Why should this a desert be?
For it is unpeopled? No;...

59

III,2,1270

How now! Back, friends; shepherd, go off a little; go with
him, sirrah.

60

III,2,1275

Didst thou hear these verses?

61

III,2,1278

That's no matter; the feet might bear the verses.

62

III,2,1281

But didst thou hear without wondering how thy name should be
hang'd and carved upon these trees?

63

III,2,1287

Trow you who hath done this?

64

III,2,1289

And a chain, that you once wore, about his neck.
Change you colour?

65

III,2,1292

O Lord, Lord! it is a hard matter for friends to meet; but
mountains may be remov'd with earthquakes, and so encounter.

66

III,2,1295

Is it possible?

67

III,2,1298

O wonderful, wonderful, most wonderful wonderful, and yet
again wonderful, and after that, out of all whooping!

68

III,2,1308

So you may put a man in your belly.

69

III,2,1311

Nay, he hath but a little beard.

70

III,2,1315

It is young Orlando, that tripp'd up the wrestler's heels
and your heart both in an instant.

71

III,2,1319

I' faith, coz, 'tis he.

72

III,2,1321

Orlando.

73

III,2,1327

You must borrow me Gargantua's mouth first; 'tis a word too
great for any mouth of this age's size. To say ay and no to these...

74

III,2,1332

It is as easy to count atomies as to resolve the
propositions of a lover; but take a taste of my finding him, and...

75

III,2,1338

Give me audience, good madam.

76

III,2,1340

There lay he, stretch'd along like a wounded knight.

77

III,2,1343

Cry 'Holla' to thy tongue, I prithee; it curvets
unseasonably. He was furnish'd like a hunter.

78

III,2,1346

I would sing my song without a burden; thou bring'st me out
of tune.

79

III,2,1350

You bring me out. Soft! comes he not here?

80

III,4,1596

Do, I prithee; but yet have the grace to consider that tears
do not become a man.

81

III,4,1599

As good cause as one would desire; therefore weep.

82

III,4,1601

Something browner than Judas's.
Marry, his kisses are Judas's own children.

83

III,4,1604

An excellent colour: your chestnut was ever the only colour.

84

III,4,1607

He hath bought a pair of cast lips of Diana. A nun of
winter's sisterhood kisses not more religiously; the very ice of...

85

III,4,1612

Nay, certainly, there is no truth in him.

86

III,4,1614

Yes; I think he is not a pick-purse nor a horse-stealer; but
for his verity in love, I do think him as concave as covered...

87

III,4,1618

Yes, when he is in; but I think he is not in.

88

III,4,1620

'Was' is not 'is'; besides, the oath of a lover is no
stronger than the word of a tapster; they are both the confirmer...

89

III,4,1628

O, that's a brave man! He writes brave verses, speaks brave
words, swears brave oaths, and breaks them bravely, quite...

90

III,4,1640

Well, and what of him?

91

IV,1,1852

It pleases him to call you so; but he hath a Rosalind of a
better leer than you.

92

IV,1,1904

I cannot say the words.

93

IV,1,1906

Go to. Will you, Orlando, have to wife this Rosalind?

94

IV,1,1965

You have simply misus'd our sex in your love-prate. We must
have your doublet and hose pluck'd over your head, and show the...

95

IV,1,1971

Or rather, bottomless; that as fast as you pour affection
in, it runs out.

96

IV,1,1979

And I'll sleep. Exeunt

97

IV,3,2003

I warrant you, with pure love and troubled brain, he hath
ta'en his bow and arrows, and is gone forth- to sleep. Look, who...

98

IV,3,2067

Alas, poor shepherd!

99

IV,3,2080

West of this place, down in the neighbour bottom.
The rank of osiers by the murmuring stream...

100

IV,3,2092

It is no boast, being ask'd, to say we are.

101

IV,3,2100

I pray you, tell it.

102

IV,3,2124

O, I have heard him speak of that same brother;
And he did render him the most unnatural...

103

IV,3,2137

Are you his brother?

104

IV,3,2139

Was't you that did so oft contrive to kill him?

105

IV,3,2164

Why, how now, Ganymede! sweet Ganymede!

106

IV,3,2166

There is more in it. Cousin Ganymede!

107

IV,3,2169

We'll lead you thither.
I pray you, will you take him by the arm?

108

IV,3,2182

Come, you look paler and paler; pray you draw homewards.
Good sir, go with us.

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