Speeches (Lines) for Capulet
in "Romeo and Juliet"

Total: 51

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,93

What noise is this? Give me my long sword, ho!

2

I,1,95

My sword, I say! Old Montague is come,
And flourishes his blade in spite of me.

3

I,2,271

But Montague is bound as well as I,
In penalty alike; and 'tis not hard, I think,...

4

I,2,277

But saying o'er what I have said before:
My child is yet a stranger in the world;...

5

I,2,283

And too soon marr'd are those so early made.
The earth hath swallow'd all my hopes but she,...

6

I,5,634

Welcome, gentlemen! ladies that have their toes
Unplagued with corns will have a bout with you....

7

I,5,654

What, man! 'tis not so much, 'tis not so much:
'Tis since the nuptials of Lucentio,...

8

I,5,660

Will you tell me that?
His son was but a ward two years ago.

9

I,5,682

Why, how now, kinsman! wherefore storm you so?

10

I,5,686

Young Romeo is it?

11

I,5,688

Content thee, gentle coz, let him alone;
He bears him like a portly gentleman;...

12

I,5,700

He shall be endured:
What, goodman boy! I say, he shall: go to;...

13

I,5,707

Go to, go to;
You are a saucy boy: is't so, indeed?...

14

I,5,750

Nay, gentlemen, prepare not to be gone;
We have a trifling foolish banquet towards....

15

III,4,2059

Things have fall'n out, sir, so unluckily,
That we have had no time to move our daughter:...

16

III,4,2070

Sir Paris, I will make a desperate tender
Of my child's love: I think she will be ruled...

17

III,4,2078

Monday! ha, ha! Well, Wednesday is too soon,
O' Thursday let it be: o' Thursday, tell her,...

18

III,4,2089

Well get you gone: o' Thursday be it, then.
Go you to Juliet ere you go to bed,...

19

III,5,2233

When the sun sets, the air doth drizzle dew;
But for the sunset of my brother's son...

20

III,5,2248

Soft! take me with you, take me with you, wife.
How! will she none? doth she not give us thanks?...

21

III,5,2256

How now, how now, chop-logic! What is this?
'Proud,' and 'I thank you,' and 'I thank you not;'...

22

III,5,2268

Hang thee, young baggage! disobedient wretch!
I tell thee what: get thee to church o' Thursday,...

23

III,5,2279

And why, my lady wisdom? hold your tongue,
Good prudence; smatter with your gossips, go.

24

III,5,2282

O, God ye god-den.

25

III,5,2284

Peace, you mumbling fool!
Utter your gravity o'er a gossip's bowl;...

26

III,5,2288

God's bread! it makes me mad:
Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play,...

27

IV,2,2495

So many guests invite as here are writ.
[Exit First Servant]...

28

IV,2,2500

How canst thou try them so?

29

IV,2,2504

Go, be gone.
[Exit Second Servant]...

30

IV,2,2509

Well, he may chance to do some good on her:
A peevish self-will'd harlotry it is.

31

IV,2,2513

How now, my headstrong! where have you been gadding?

32

IV,2,2520

Send for the county; go tell him of this:
I'll have this knot knit up to-morrow morning.

33

IV,2,2525

Why, I am glad on't; this is well: stand up:
This is as't should be. Let me see the county;...

34

IV,2,2534

Go, nurse, go with her: we'll to church to-morrow.

35

IV,2,2538

Tush, I will stir about,
And all things shall be well, I warrant thee, wife:...

36

IV,4,2616

Come, stir, stir, stir! the second cock hath crow'd,
The curfew-bell hath rung, 'tis three o'clock:...

37

IV,4,2623

No, not a whit: what! I have watch'd ere now
All night for lesser cause, and ne'er been sick.

38

IV,4,2628

A jealous hood, a jealous hood!

39

IV,4,2630

Now, fellow,
What's there?

40

IV,4,2633

Make haste, make haste.
[Exit First Servant]...

41

IV,4,2640

Mass, and well said; a merry whoreson, ha!
Thou shalt be logger-head. Good faith, 'tis day:...

42

IV,5,2679

For shame, bring Juliet forth; her lord is come.

43

IV,5,2682

Ha! let me see her: out, alas! she's cold:
Her blood is settled, and her joints are stiff;...

44

IV,5,2689

Death, that hath ta'en her hence to make me wail,
Ties up my tongue, and will not let me speak.

45

IV,5,2693

Ready to go, but never to return.
O son! the night before thy wedding-day...

46

IV,5,2718

Despised, distressed, hated, martyr'd, kill'd!
Uncomfortable time, why camest thou now...

47

IV,5,2743

All things that we ordained festival,
Turn from their office to black funeral;...

48

V,3,3163

What should it be, that they so shriek abroad?

49

V,3,3175

O heavens! O wife, look how our daughter bleeds!
This dagger hath mista'en—for, lo, his house...

50

V,3,3271

O brother Montague, give me thy hand:
This is my daughter's jointure, for no more...

51

V,3,3279

As rich shall Romeo's by his lady's lie;
Poor sacrifices of our enmity!

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