Speeches (Lines) for Earl of Cambridge
in "Henry V"

Total: 5

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,2,660

Henry V. I doubt not that; since we are well persuaded
We carry not a heart with us from hence
That grows not in a fair consent with ours,
Nor leave not one behind that doth not wish
Success and conquest to attend on us.

Earl of Cambridge. Never was monarch better fear'd and loved
Than is your majesty: there's not, I think, a subject
That sits in heart-grief and uneasiness
Under the sweet shade of your government.


2

II,2,683

Henry V. O, let us yet be merciful.

Earl of Cambridge. So may your highness, and yet punish too.


3

II,2,697

Henry V. Alas, your too much love and care of me
Are heavy orisons 'gainst this poor wretch!
If little faults, proceeding on distemper,
Shall not be wink'd at, how shall we stretch our eye
When capital crimes, chew'd, swallow'd and digested,
Appear before us? We'll yet enlarge that man,
Though Cambridge, Scroop and Grey, in their dear care
And tender preservation of our person,
Would have him punished. And now to our French causes:
Who are the late commissioners?

Earl of Cambridge. I one, my lord:
Your highness bade me ask for it to-day.


4

II,2,712

Henry V. Then, Richard Earl of Cambridge, there is yours;
There yours, Lord Scroop of Masham; and, sir knight,
Grey of Northumberland, this same is yours:
Read them; and know, I know your worthiness.
My Lord of Westmoreland, and uncle Exeter,
We will aboard to night. Why, how now, gentlemen!
What see you in those papers that you lose
So much complexion? Look ye, how they change!
Their cheeks are paper. Why, what read you there
That hath so cowarded and chased your blood
Out of appearance?

Earl of Cambridge. I do confess my fault;
And do submit me to your highness' mercy.


5

II,2,791

Lord Scroop. Our purposes God justly hath discover'd;
And I repent my fault more than my death;
Which I beseech your highness to forgive,
Although my body pay the price of it.

Earl of Cambridge. For me, the gold of France did not seduce;
Although I did admit it as a motive
The sooner to effect what I intended:
But God be thanked for prevention;
Which I in sufferance heartily will rejoice,
Beseeching God and you to pardon me.


Return to the "Henry V" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS