Speeches (Lines) for Brabantio
in "Othello"

Total: 30

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,86

What is the reason of this terrible summons?
What is the matter there?

2

I,1,90

Why, wherefore ask you this?

3

I,1,99

What, have you lost your wits?

4

I,1,101

Not I. what are you?

5

I,1,103

The worser welcome:
I have charged thee not to haunt about my doors:...

6

I,1,111

But thou must needs be sure
My spirit and my place have in them power...

7

I,1,115

What tell'st thou me of robbing? this is Venice;
My house is not a grange.

8

I,1,125

What profane wretch art thou?

9

I,1,128

Thou art a villain.

10

I,1,130

This thou shalt answer; I know thee, Roderigo.

11

I,1,152

Strike on the tinder, ho!
Give me a taper! call up all my people!...

12

I,1,176

It is too true an evil: gone she is;
And what's to come of my despised time...

13

I,1,185

O heaven! How got she out? O treason of the blood!
Fathers, from hence trust not your daughters' minds...

14

I,1,192

Call up my brother. O, would you had had her!
Some one way, some another. Do you know...

15

I,1,197

Pray you, lead on. At every house I'll call;
I may command at most. Get weapons, ho!...

16

I,2,276

Down with him, thief!

17

I,2,282

O thou foul thief, where hast thou stow'd my daughter?
Damn'd as thou art, thou hast enchanted her;...

18

I,2,307

To prison, till fit time
Of law and course of direct session...

19

I,2,318

How! the duke in council!
In this time of the night! Bring him away:...

20

I,3,387

So did I yours. Good your grace, pardon me;
Neither my place nor aught I heard of business...

21

I,3,395

My daughter! O, my daughter!

22

I,3,397

Ay, to me;
She is abused, stol'n from me, and corrupted...

23

I,3,409

Humbly I thank your grace.
Here is the man, this Moor, whom now, it seems,...

24

I,3,415

Nothing, but this is so.

25

I,3,435

A maiden never bold;
Of spirit so still and quiet, that her motion...

26

I,3,522

I pray you, hear her speak:
If she confess that she was half the wooer,...

27

I,3,538

God be wi' you! I have done.
Please it your grace, on to the state-affairs:...

28

I,3,559

So let the Turk of Cyprus us beguile;
We lose it not, so long as we can smile....

29

I,3,591

I'll not have it so.

30

I,3,649

Look to her, Moor, if thou hast eyes to see:
She has deceived her father, and may thee.

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