Speeches (Lines) for Borachio
in "Much Ado about Nothing"

Total: 38

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,369

I came yonder from a great supper: the prince your
brother is royally entertained by Leonato: and I...

2

I,3,375

Marry, it is your brother's right hand.

3

I,3,377

Even he.

4

I,3,380

Marry, on Hero, the daughter and heir of Leonato.

5

I,3,382

Being entertained for a perfumer, as I was smoking a
musty room, comes me the prince and Claudio, hand...

6

I,3,396

We'll wait upon your lordship.

7

II,1,544

And that is Claudio: I know him by his bearing.

8

II,1,553

So did I too; and he swore he would marry her to-night.

9

II,2,763

Yea, my lord; but I can cross it.

10

II,2,768

Not honestly, my lord; but so covertly that no
dishonesty shall appear in me.

11

II,2,771

I think I told your lordship a year since, how much
I am in the favour of Margaret, the waiting...

12

II,2,775

I can, at any unseasonable instant of the night,
appoint her to look out at her lady's chamber window.

13

II,2,778

The poison of that lies in you to temper. Go you to
the prince your brother; spare not to tell him that...

14

II,2,784

Proof enough to misuse the prince, to vex Claudio,
to undo Hero and kill Leonato. Look you for any...

15

II,2,788

Go, then; find me a meet hour to draw Don Pedro and
the Count Claudio alone: tell them that you know...

16

II,2,808

Be you constant in the accusation, and my cunning
shall not shame me.

17

III,3,1411

What Conrade!

18

III,3,1413

Conrade, I say!

19

III,3,1415

Mass, and my elbow itched; I thought there would a
scab follow.

20

III,3,1419

Stand thee close, then, under this pent-house, for
it drizzles rain; and I will, like a true drunkard,...

21

III,3,1423

Therefore know I have earned of Don John a thousand ducats.

22

III,3,1425

Thou shouldst rather ask if it were possible any
villany should be so rich; for when rich villains...

23

III,3,1430

That shows thou art unconfirmed. Thou knowest that
the fashion of a doublet, or a hat, or a cloak, is...

24

III,3,1434

I mean, the fashion.

25

III,3,1436

Tush! I may as well say the fool's the fool. But
seest thou not what a deformed thief this fashion...

26

III,3,1442

Didst thou not hear somebody?

27

III,3,1444

Seest thou not, I say, what a deformed thief this
fashion is? how giddily a' turns about all the hot...

28

III,3,1456

Not so, neither: but know that I have to-night
wooed Margaret, the Lady Hero's gentlewoman, by the...

29

III,3,1465

Two of them did, the prince and Claudio; but the
devil my master knew she was Margaret; and partly...

30

III,3,1485

We are like to prove a goodly commodity, being taken
up of these men's bills.

31

IV,2,1993

Borachio.

32

IV,2,2010

Sir, I say to you we are none.

33

IV,2,2022

Master constable,—

34

V,1,2302

Sweet prince, let me go no farther to mine answer:
do you hear me, and let this count kill me. I have...

35

V,1,2319

Yea, and paid me richly for the practise of it.

36

V,1,2334

If you would know your wronger, look on me.

37

V,1,2337

Yea, even I alone.

38

V,1,2376

No, by my soul, she was not,
Nor knew not what she did when she spoke to me,...

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