Speeches (Lines) for Benvolio
in "Romeo and Juliet"

Total: 64

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,76

Part, fools!
Put up your swords; you know not what you do.

2

I,1,82

I do but keep the peace: put up thy sword,
Or manage it to part these men with me.

3

I,1,127

Here were the servants of your adversary,
And yours, close fighting ere I did approach:...

4

I,1,139

Madam, an hour before the worshipp'd sun
Peer'd forth the golden window of the east,...

5

I,1,163

My noble uncle, do you know the cause?

6

I,1,165

Have you importuned him by any means?

7

I,1,177

See, where he comes: so please you, step aside;
I'll know his grievance, or be much denied.

8

I,1,182

Good-morrow, cousin.

9

I,1,184

But new struck nine.

10

I,1,187

It was. What sadness lengthens Romeo's hours?

11

I,1,189

In love?

12

I,1,191

Of love?

13

I,1,193

Alas, that love, so gentle in his view,
Should be so tyrannous and rough in proof!

14

I,1,209

No, coz, I rather weep.

15

I,1,211

At thy good heart's oppression.

16

I,1,223

Soft! I will go along;
An if you leave me so, you do me wrong.

17

I,1,227

Tell me in sadness, who is that you love.

18

I,1,229

Groan! why, no.
But sadly tell me who.

19

I,1,234

I aim'd so near, when I supposed you loved.

20

I,1,236

A right fair mark, fair coz, is soonest hit.

21

I,1,246

Then she hath sworn that she will still live chaste?

22

I,1,254

Be ruled by me, forget to think of her.

23

I,1,256

By giving liberty unto thine eyes;
Examine other beauties.

24

I,1,268

I'll pay that doctrine, or else die in debt.

25

I,2,319

Tut, man, one fire burns out another's burning,
One pain is lessen'd by another's anguish;...

26

I,2,326

For what, I pray thee?

27

I,2,328

Why, Romeo, art thou mad?

28

I,2,359

At this same ancient feast of Capulet's
Sups the fair Rosaline whom thou so lovest,...

29

I,2,371

Tut, you saw her fair, none else being by,
Herself poised with herself in either eye:...

30

I,4,499

The date is out of such prolixity:
We'll have no Cupid hoodwink'd with a scarf,...

31

I,4,529

Come, knock and enter; and no sooner in,
But every man betake him to his legs.

32

I,4,606

This wind, you talk of, blows us from ourselves;
Supper is done, and we shall come too late.

33

I,4,616

Strike, drum.

34

I,5,748

Away, begone; the sport is at the best.

35

II,1,800

Romeo! my cousin Romeo!

36

II,1,803

He ran this way, and leap'd this orchard wall:
Call, good Mercutio.

37

II,1,821

And if he hear thee, thou wilt anger him.

38

II,1,829

Come, he hath hid himself among these trees,
To be consorted with the humorous night:...

39

II,1,841

Go, then; for 'tis in vain
To seek him here that means not to be found.

40

II,4,1161

Not to his father's; I spoke with his man.

41

II,4,1164

Tybalt, the kinsman of old Capulet,
Hath sent a letter to his father's house.

42

II,4,1167

Romeo will answer it.

43

II,4,1169

Nay, he will answer the letter's master, how he
dares, being dared.

44

II,4,1176

Why, what is Tybalt?

45

II,4,1186

The what?

46

II,4,1197

Here comes Romeo, here comes Romeo.

47

II,4,1248

Stop there, stop there.

48

II,4,1250

Thou wouldst else have made thy tale large.

49

II,4,1257

Two, two; a shirt and a smock.

50

II,4,1282

She will indite him to some supper.

51

III,1,1499

I pray thee, good Mercutio, let's retire:
The day is hot, the Capulets abroad,...

52

III,1,1508

Am I like such a fellow?

53

III,1,1512

And what to?

54

III,1,1529

An I were so apt to quarrel as thou art, any man
should buy the fee-simple of my life for an hour and a quarter.

55

III,1,1532

By my head, here come the Capulets.

56

III,1,1547

We talk here in the public haunt of men:
Either withdraw unto some private place,...

57

III,1,1596

What, art thou hurt?

58

III,1,1624

O Romeo, Romeo, brave Mercutio's dead!
That gallant spirit hath aspired the clouds,...

59

III,1,1629

Here comes the furious Tybalt back again.

60

III,1,1643

Romeo, away, be gone!
The citizens are up, and Tybalt slain....

61

III,1,1648

Why dost thou stay?

62

III,1,1653

There lies that Tybalt.

63

III,1,1659

O noble prince, I can discover all
The unlucky manage of this fatal brawl:...

64

III,1,1669

Tybalt, here slain, whom Romeo's hand did slay;
Romeo that spoke him fair, bade him bethink...

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