Speeches (Lines) for Benedick
in "Much Ado about Nothing"

Total: 134

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,95

Were you in doubt, sir, that you asked her?

2

I,1,101

If Signior Leonato be her father, she would not
have his head on her shoulders for all Messina, as...

3

I,1,106

What, my dear Lady Disdain! are you yet living?

4

I,1,111

Then is courtesy a turncoat. But it is certain I
am loved of all ladies, only you excepted: and I...

5

I,1,120

God keep your ladyship still in that mind! so some
gentleman or other shall 'scape a predestinate...

6

I,1,125

Well, you are a rare parrot-teacher.

7

I,1,127

I would my horse had the speed of your tongue, and
so good a continuer. But keep your way, i' God's...

8

I,1,147

I noted her not; but I looked on her.

9

I,1,149

Do you question me, as an honest man should do, for
my simple true judgment; or would you have me speak...

10

I,1,153

Why, i' faith, methinks she's too low for a high
praise, too brown for a fair praise and too little...

11

I,1,161

Would you buy her, that you inquire after her?

12

I,1,163

Yea, and a case to put it into. But speak you this
with a sad brow? or do you play the flouting Jack,...

13

I,1,170

I can see yet without spectacles and I see no such
matter: there's her cousin, an she were not...

14

I,1,177

Is't come to this? In faith, hath not the world
one man but he will wear his cap with suspicion?...

15

I,1,186

I would your grace would constrain me to tell.

16

I,1,188

You hear, Count Claudio: I can be secret as a dumb
man; I would have you think so; but, on my...

17

I,1,195

Like the old tale, my lord: 'it is not so, nor
'twas not so, but, indeed, God forbid it should be...

18

I,1,204

And, by my two faiths and troths, my lord, I spoke mine.

19

I,1,207

That I neither feel how she should be loved nor
know how she should be worthy, is the opinion that...

20

I,1,214

That a woman conceived me, I thank her; that she
brought me up, I likewise give her most humble...

21

I,1,223

With anger, with sickness, or with hunger, my lord,
not with love: prove that ever I lose more blood...

22

I,1,231

If I do, hang me in a bottle like a cat and shoot
at me; and he that hits me, let him be clapped on...

23

I,1,236

The savage bull may; but if ever the sensible
Benedick bear it, pluck off the bull's horns and set...

24

I,1,245

I look for an earthquake too, then.

25

I,1,251

I have almost matter enough in me for such an
embassage; and so I commit you—

26

I,1,255

Nay, mock not, mock not. The body of your
discourse is sometime guarded with fragments, and...

27

II,1,511

No, you shall pardon me.

28

II,1,513

Not now.

29

II,1,517

What's he?

30

II,1,519

Not I, believe me.

31

II,1,521

I pray you, what is he?

32

II,1,529

When I know the gentleman, I'll tell him what you say.

33

II,1,537

In every good thing.

34

II,1,568

Count Claudio?

35

II,1,570

Come, will you go with me?

36

II,1,572

Even to the next willow, about your own business,
county. What fashion will you wear the garland of?...

37

II,1,578

Why, that's spoken like an honest drovier: so they
sell bullocks. But did you think the prince would...

38

II,1,582

Ho! now you strike like the blind man: 'twas the
boy that stole your meat, and you'll beat the post.

39

II,1,586

Alas, poor hurt fowl! now will he creep into sedges.
But that my Lady Beatrice should know me, and not...

40

II,1,596

Troth, my lord, I have played the part of Lady Fame.
I found him here as melancholy as a lodge in a...

41

II,1,604

The flat transgression of a schoolboy, who, being
overjoyed with finding a birds' nest, shows it his...

42

II,1,609

Yet it had not been amiss the rod had been made,
and the garland too; for the garland he might have...

43

II,1,615

If their singing answer your saying, by my faith,
you say honestly.

44

II,1,620

O, she misused me past the endurance of a block!
an oak but with one green leaf on it would have...

45

II,1,644

Will your grace command me any service to the
world's end? I will go on the slightest errand now...

46

II,1,654

O God, sir, here's a dish I love not: I cannot
endure my Lady Tongue.

47

II,3,813

Boy!

48

II,3,816

In my chamber-window lies a book: bring it hither
to me in the orchard.

49

II,3,819

I know that; but I would have thee hence, and here again.
[Exit Boy]...

50

II,3,877

Now, divine air! now is his soul ravished! Is it
not strange that sheeps' guts should hale souls out...

51

II,3,898

An he had been a dog that should have howled thus,
they would have hanged him: and I pray God his bad...

52

II,3,917

Is't possible? Sits the wind in that corner?

53

II,3,936

I should think this a gull, but that the
white-bearded fellow speaks it: knavery cannot,...

54

II,3,1026

[Coming forward] This can be no trick: the
conference was sadly borne. They have the truth of...

55

II,3,1055

Fair Beatrice, I thank you for your pains.

56

II,3,1059

You take pleasure then in the message?

57

II,3,1064

Ha! 'Against my will I am sent to bid you come in
to dinner;' there's a double meaning in that 'I took...

58

III,2,1213

Gallants, I am not as I have been.

59

III,2,1219

I have the toothache.

60

III,2,1221

Hang it!

61

III,2,1225

Well, every one can master a grief but he that has
it.

62

III,2,1260

Yet is this no charm for the toothache. Old
signior, walk aside with me: I have studied eight...

63

IV,1,1661

How now! interjections? Why, then, some be of
laughing, as, ah, ha, he!

64

IV,1,1710

This looks not like a nuptial.

65

IV,1,1759

How doth the lady?

66

IV,1,1793

Sir, sir, be patient.
For my part, I am so attired in wonder,...

67

IV,1,1797

Lady, were you her bedfellow last night?

68

IV,1,1837

Two of them have the very bent of honour;
And if their wisdoms be misled in this,...

69

IV,1,1896

Signior Leonato, let the friar advise you:
And though you know my inwardness and love...

70

IV,1,1909

Lady Beatrice, have you wept all this while?

71

IV,1,1911

I will not desire that.

72

IV,1,1913

Surely I do believe your fair cousin is wronged.

73

IV,1,1915

Is there any way to show such friendship?

74

IV,1,1917

May a man do it?

75

IV,1,1919

I do love nothing in the world so well as you: is
not that strange?

76

IV,1,1925

By my sword, Beatrice, thou lovest me.

77

IV,1,1927

I will swear by it that you love me; and I will make
him eat it that says I love not you.

78

IV,1,1930

With no sauce that can be devised to it. I protest
I love thee.

79

IV,1,1933

What offence, sweet Beatrice?

80

IV,1,1936

And do it with all thy heart.

81

IV,1,1939

Come, bid me do any thing for thee.

82

IV,1,1941

Ha! not for the wide world.

83

IV,1,1943

Tarry, sweet Beatrice.

84

IV,1,1946

Beatrice,—

85

IV,1,1948

We'll be friends first.

86

IV,1,1950

Is Claudio thine enemy?

87

IV,1,1958

Hear me, Beatrice,—

88

IV,1,1960

Nay, but, Beatrice,—

89

IV,1,1962

Beat—

90

IV,1,1972

Tarry, good Beatrice. By this hand, I love thee.

91

IV,1,1974

Think you in your soul the Count Claudio hath wronged Hero?

92

IV,1,1976

Enough, I am engaged; I will challenge him. I will
kiss your hand, and so I leave you. By this hand,...

93

V,1,2191

Good day, my lord.

94

V,1,2198

In a false quarrel there is no true valour. I came
to seek you both.

95

V,1,2203

It is in my scabbard: shall I draw it?

96

V,1,2212

Sir, I shall meet your wit in the career, and you
charge it against me. I pray you choose another subject.

97

V,1,2219

Shall I speak a word in your ear?

98

V,1,2221

[Aside to CLAUDIO] You are a villain; I jest not:
I will make it good how you dare, with what you...

99

V,1,2233

Sir, your wit ambles well; it goes easily.

100

V,1,2259

Fare you well, boy: you know my mind. I will leave
you now to your gossip-like humour: you break jests...

101

V,2,2411

Pray thee, sweet Mistress Margaret, deserve well at
my hands by helping me to the speech of Beatrice.

102

V,2,2414

In so high a style, Margaret, that no man living
shall come over it; for, in most comely truth, thou...

103

V,2,2419

Thy wit is as quick as the greyhound's mouth; it catches.

104

V,2,2422

A most manly wit, Margaret; it will not hurt a
woman: and so, I pray thee, call Beatrice: I give...

105

V,2,2426

If you use them, Margaret, you must put in the
pikes with a vice; and they are dangerous weapons for maids.

106

V,2,2429

And therefore will come.
[Exit MARGARET]...

107

V,2,2451

O, stay but till then!

108

V,2,2455

Only foul words; and thereupon I will kiss thee.

109

V,2,2459

Thou hast frighted the word out of his right sense,
so forcible is thy wit. But I must tell thee...

110

V,2,2469

Suffer love! a good epithet! I do suffer love
indeed, for I love thee against my will.

111

V,2,2474

Thou and I are too wise to woo peaceably.

112

V,2,2477

An old, an old instance, Beatrice, that lived in
the lime of good neighbours. If a man do not erect...

113

V,2,2483

Question: why, an hour in clamour and a quarter in
rheum: therefore is it most expedient for the...

114

V,2,2491

And how do you?

115

V,2,2493

Serve God, love me and mend. There will I leave
you too, for here comes one in haste.

116

V,2,2502

I will live in thy heart, die in thy lap, and be
buried in thy eyes; and moreover I will go with...

117

V,4,2552

And so am I, being else by faith enforced
To call young Claudio to a reckoning for it.

118

V,4,2563

Friar, I must entreat your pains, I think.

119

V,4,2565

To bind me, or undo me; one of them.
Signior Leonato, truth it is, good signior,...

120

V,4,2569

And I do with an eye of love requite her.

121

V,4,2572

Your answer, sir, is enigmatical:
But, for my will, my will is your good will...

122

V,4,2596

Bull Jove, sir, had an amiable low;
And some such strange bull leap'd your father's cow,...

123

V,4,2623

Soft and fair, friar. Which is Beatrice?

124

V,4,2625

Do not you love me?

125

V,4,2627

Why, then your uncle and the prince and Claudio
Have been deceived; they swore you did.

126

V,4,2630

Troth, no; no more than reason.

127

V,4,2633

They swore that you were almost sick for me.

128

V,4,2635

'Tis no such matter. Then you do not love me?

129

V,4,2645

A miracle! here's our own hands against our hearts.
Come, I will have thee; but, by this light, I take...

130

V,4,2651

Peace! I will stop your mouth.

131

V,4,2654

I'll tell thee what, prince; a college of
wit-crackers cannot flout me out of my humour. Dost...

132

V,4,2671

Come, come, we are friends: let's have a dance ere
we are married, that we may lighten our own hearts...

133

V,4,2675

First, of my word; therefore play, music. Prince,
thou art sad; get thee a wife, get thee a wife:...

134

V,4,2681

Think not on him till to-morrow:
I'll devise thee brave punishments for him....

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