Speeches (Lines) for Sir Toby Belch
in "Twelfth Night"

Total: 152

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,116

What a plague means my niece, to take the death of
her brother thus? I am sure care's an enemy to life.

2

I,3,121

Why, let her except, before excepted.

3

I,3,124

Confine! I'll confine myself no finer than I am:
these clothes are good enough to drink in; and so be
these boots too: an they be not, let them hang
themselves in their own straps.

4

I,3,131

Who, Sir Andrew Aguecheek?

5

I,3,133

He's as tall a man as any's in Illyria.

6

I,3,135

Why, he has three thousand ducats a year.

7

I,3,138

Fie, that you'll say so! he plays o' the
viol-de-gamboys, and speaks three or four languages
word for word without book, and hath all the good
gifts of nature.

8

I,3,147

By this hand, they are scoundrels and subtractors
that say so of him. Who are they?

9

I,3,150

With drinking healths to my niece: I'll drink to
her as long as there is a passage in my throat and
drink in Illyria: he's a coward and a coystrill
that will not drink to my niece till his brains turn
o' the toe like a parish-top. What, wench!
Castiliano vulgo! for here comes Sir Andrew Agueface.

10

I,3,158

Sweet Sir Andrew!

11

I,3,161

Accost, Sir Andrew, accost.

12

I,3,163

My niece's chambermaid.

13

I,3,167

You mistake, knight; 'accost' is front her, board
her, woo her, assail her.

14

I,3,172

An thou let part so, Sir Andrew, would thou mightst
never draw sword again.

15

I,3,190

O knight thou lackest a cup of canary: when did I
see thee so put down?

16

I,3,196

No question.

17

I,3,199

Pourquoi, my dear knight?

18

I,3,204

Then hadst thou had an excellent head of hair.

19

I,3,206

Past question; for thou seest it will not curl by nature.

20

I,3,208

Excellent; it hangs like flax on a distaff; and I
hope to see a housewife take thee between her legs
and spin it off.

21

I,3,214

She'll none o' the count: she'll not match above
her degree, neither in estate, years, nor wit; I
have heard her swear't. Tut, there's life in't,
man.

22

I,3,221

Art thou good at these kickshawses, knight?

23

I,3,225

What is thy excellence in a galliard, knight?

24

I,3,227

And I can cut the mutton to't.

25

I,3,230

Wherefore are these things hid? wherefore have
these gifts a curtain before 'em? are they like to
take dust, like Mistress Mall's picture? why dost
thou not go to church in a galliard and come home in
a coranto? My very walk should be a jig; I would not
so much as make water but in a sink-a-pace. What
dost thou mean? Is it a world to hide virtues in?
I did think, by the excellent constitution of thy
leg, it was formed under the star of a galliard.

26

I,3,241

What shall we do else? were we not born under Taurus?

27

I,3,243

No, sir; it is legs and thighs. Let me see the
caper; ha! higher: ha, ha! excellent!

28

I,5,410

A gentleman.

29

I,5,412

'Tis a gentle man here—a plague o' these
pickle-herring! How now, sot!

30

I,5,416

Lechery! I defy lechery. There's one at the gate.

31

I,5,418

Let him be the devil, an he will, I care not: give
me faith, say I. Well, it's all one.

32

II,3,701

Approach, Sir Andrew: not to be abed after
midnight is to be up betimes; and 'diluculo
surgere,' thou know'st,—

33

II,3,706

A false conclusion: I hate it as an unfilled can.
To be up after midnight and to go to bed then, is
early: so that to go to bed after midnight is to go
to bed betimes. Does not our life consist of the
four elements?

34

II,3,713

Thou'rt a scholar; let us therefore eat and drink.
Marian, I say! a stoup of wine!

35

II,3,719

Welcome, ass. Now let's have a catch.

36

II,3,733

Come on; there is sixpence for you: let's have a song.

37

II,3,736

A love-song, a love-song.

38

II,3,746

Good, good.

39

II,3,755

A contagious breath.

40

II,3,757

To hear by the nose, it is dulcet in contagion.
But shall we make the welkin dance indeed? shall we
rouse the night-owl in a catch that will draw three
souls out of one weaver? shall we do that?

41

II,3,775

My lady's a Cataian, we are politicians, Malvolio's
a Peg-a-Ramsey, and 'Three merry men be we.' Am not
I consanguineous? am I not of her blood?
Tillyvally. Lady!
[Sings]
'There dwelt a man in Babylon, lady, lady!'

42

II,3,785

[Sings] 'O, the twelfth day of December,'—

43

II,3,795

We did keep time, sir, in our catches. Sneck up!

44

II,3,803

'Farewell, dear heart, since I must needs be gone.'

45

II,3,807

'But I will never die.'

46

II,3,810

'Shall I bid him go?'

47

II,3,812

'Shall I bid him go, and spare not?'

48

II,3,814

Out o' tune, sir: ye lie. Art any more than a
steward? Dost thou think, because thou art
virtuous, there shall be no more cakes and ale?

49

II,3,819

Thou'rt i' the right. Go, sir, rub your chain with
crumbs. A stoup of wine, Maria!

50

II,3,829

Do't, knight: I'll write thee a challenge: or I'll
deliver thy indignation to him by word of mouth.

51

II,3,838

Possess us, possess us; tell us something of him.

52

II,3,841

What, for being a puritan? thy exquisite reason,
dear knight?

53

II,3,853

What wilt thou do?

54

II,3,861

Excellent! I smell a device.

55

II,3,863

He shall think, by the letters that thou wilt drop,
that they come from my niece, and that she's in
love with him.

56

II,3,876

Good night, Penthesilea.

57

II,3,878

She's a beagle, true-bred, and one that adores me:
what o' that?

58

II,3,881

Let's to bed, knight. Thou hadst need send for
more money.

59

II,3,884

Send for money, knight: if thou hast her not i'
the end, call me cut.

60

II,3,887

Come, come, I'll go burn some sack; 'tis too late
to go to bed now: come, knight; come, knight.

61

II,5,1029

Come thy ways, Signior Fabian.

62

II,5,1032

Wouldst thou not be glad to have the niggardly
rascally sheep-biter come by some notable shame?

63

II,5,1036

To anger him we'll have the bear again; and we will
fool him black and blue: shall we not, Sir Andrew?

64

II,5,1039

Here comes the little villain.
[Enter MARIA]
How now, my metal of India!

65

II,5,1058

Here's an overweening rogue!

66

II,5,1062

Peace, I say.

67

II,5,1064

Ah, rogue!

68

II,5,1066

Peace, peace!

69

II,5,1074

O, for a stone-bow, to hit him in the eye!

70

II,5,1078

Fire and brimstone!

71

II,5,1084

Bolts and shackles!

72

II,5,1090

Shall this fellow live?

73

II,5,1094

And does not Toby take you a blow o' the lips then?

74

II,5,1097

What, what?

75

II,5,1099

Out, scab!

76

II,5,1109

O, peace! and the spirit of humour intimate reading
aloud to him!

77

II,5,1127

Marry, hang thee, brock!

78

II,5,1134

Excellent wench, say I.

79

II,5,1138

And with what wing the staniel cheques at it!

80

II,5,1146

O, ay, make up that: he is now at a cold scent.

81

II,5,1155

Ay, or I'll cudgel him, and make him cry O!

82

II,5,1208

I could marry this wench for this device.

83

II,5,1210

And ask no other dowry with her but such another jest.

84

II,5,1214

Wilt thou set thy foot o' my neck?

85

II,5,1216

Shall I play my freedom at traytrip, and become thy
bond-slave?

86

II,5,1219

Why, thou hast put him in such a dream, that when
the image of it leaves him he must run mad.

87

II,5,1222

Like aqua-vitae with a midwife.

88

II,5,1232

To the gates of Tartar, thou most excellent devil of wit!

89

III,1,1304

Save you, gentleman.

90

III,1,1309

Will you encounter the house? my niece is desirous
you should enter, if your trade be to her.

91

III,1,1313

Taste your legs, sir; put them to motion.

92

III,1,1316

I mean, to go, sir, to enter.

93

III,2,1407

Thy reason, dear venom, give thy reason.

94

III,2,1412

Did she see thee the while, old boy? tell me that.

95

III,2,1418

And they have been grand-jury-men since before Noah
was a sailor.

96

III,2,1435

Why, then, build me thy fortunes upon the basis of
valour. Challenge me the count's youth to fight
with him; hurt him in eleven places: my niece shall
take note of it; and assure thyself, there is no
love-broker in the world can more prevail in man's
commendation with woman than report of valour.

97

III,2,1443

Go, write it in a martial hand; be curst and brief;
it is no matter how witty, so it be eloquent and fun
of invention: taunt him with the licence of ink:
if thou thou'st him some thrice, it shall not be
amiss; and as many lies as will lie in thy sheet of
paper, although the sheet were big enough for the
bed of Ware in England, set 'em down: go, about it.
Let there be gall enough in thy ink, though thou
write with a goose-pen, no matter: about it.

98

III,2,1453

We'll call thee at the cubiculo: go.

99

III,2,1456

I have been dear to him, lad, some two thousand
strong, or so.

100

III,2,1460

Never trust me, then; and by all means stir on the
youth to an answer. I think oxen and wainropes
cannot hale them together. For Andrew, if he were
opened, and you find so much blood in his liver as
will clog the foot of a flea, I'll eat the rest of
the anatomy.

101

III,2,1469

Look, where the youngest wren of nine comes.

102

III,2,1476

And cross-gartered?

103

III,2,1486

Come, bring us, bring us where he is.

104

III,4,1631

Which way is he, in the name of sanctity? If all
the devils of hell be drawn in little, and Legion
himself possessed him, yet I'll speak to him.

105

III,4,1642

Go to, go to; peace, peace; we must deal gently
with him: let me alone. How do you, Malvolio? how
is't with you? What, man! defy the devil:
consider, he's an enemy to mankind.

106

III,4,1654

Prithee, hold thy peace; this is not the way: do
you not see you move him? let me alone with him.

107

III,4,1658

Why, how now, my bawcock! how dost thou, chuck?

108

III,4,1660

Ay, Biddy, come with me. What, man! 'tis not for
gravity to play at cherry-pit with Satan: hang
him, foul collier!

109

III,4,1670

Is't possible?

110

III,4,1673

His very genius hath taken the infection of the device, man.

111

III,4,1677

Come, we'll have him in a dark room and bound. My
niece is already in the belief that he's mad: we
may carry it thus, for our pleasure and his penance,
till our very pastime, tired out of breath, prompt
us to have mercy on him: at which time we will
bring the device to the bar and crown thee for a
finder of madmen. But see, but see.

112

III,4,1690

Give me.
[Reads]
'Youth, whatsoever thou art, thou art but a scurvy fellow.'

113

III,4,1694

[Reads] 'Wonder not, nor admire not in thy mind,
why I do call thee so, for I will show thee no reason for't.'

114

III,4,1697

[Reads] 'Thou comest to the lady Olivia, and in my
sight she uses thee kindly: but thou liest in thy
throat; that is not the matter I challenge thee for.'

115

III,4,1701

[Reads] 'I will waylay thee going home; where if it
be thy chance to kill me,'—

116

III,4,1704

[Reads] 'Thou killest me like a rogue and a villain.'

117

III,4,1706

[Reads] 'Fare thee well; and God have mercy upon
one of our souls! He may have mercy upon mine; but
my hope is better, and so look to thyself. Thy
friend, as thou usest him, and thy sworn enemy,
ANDREW AGUECHEEK.
If this letter move him not, his legs cannot:
I'll give't him.

118

III,4,1715

Go, Sir Andrew: scout me for him at the corner the
orchard like a bum-baily: so soon as ever thou seest
him, draw; and, as thou drawest swear horrible; for
it comes to pass oft that a terrible oath, with a
swaggering accent sharply twanged off, gives manhood
more approbation than ever proof itself would have
earned him. Away!

119

III,4,1724

Now will not I deliver his letter: for the behavior
of the young gentleman gives him out to be of good
capacity and breeding; his employment between his
lord and my niece confirms no less: therefore this
letter, being so excellently ignorant, will breed no
terror in the youth: he will find it comes from a
clodpole. But, sir, I will deliver his challenge by
word of mouth; set upon Aguecheek a notable report
of valour; and drive the gentleman, as I know his
youth will aptly receive it, into a most hideous
opinion of his rage, skill, fury and impetuosity.
This will so fright them both that they will kill
one another by the look, like cockatrices.

120

III,4,1740

I will meditate the while upon some horrid message
for a challenge.

121

III,4,1763

Gentleman, God save thee.

122

III,4,1765

That defence thou hast, betake thee to't: of what
nature the wrongs are thou hast done him, I know
not; but thy intercepter, full of despite, bloody as
the hunter, attends thee at the orchard-end:
dismount thy tuck, be yare in thy preparation, for
thy assailant is quick, skilful and deadly.

123

III,4,1774

You'll find it otherwise, I assure you: therefore,
if you hold your life at any price, betake you to
your guard; for your opposite hath in him what
youth, strength, skill and wrath can furnish man withal.

124

III,4,1779

He is knight, dubbed with unhatched rapier and on
carpet consideration; but he is a devil in private
brawl: souls and bodies hath he divorced three; and
his incensement at this moment is so implacable,
that satisfaction can be none but by pangs of death
and sepulchre. Hob, nob, is his word; give't or take't.

125

III,4,1790

Sir, no; his indignation derives itself out of a
very competent injury: therefore, get you on and
give him his desire. Back you shall not to the
house, unless you undertake that with me which with
as much safety you might answer him: therefore, on,
or strip your sword stark naked; for meddle you
must, that's certain, or forswear to wear iron about you.

126

III,4,1801

I will do so. Signior Fabian, stay you by this
gentleman till my return.

127

III,4,1820

Why, man, he's a very devil; I have not seen such a
firago. I had a pass with him, rapier, scabbard and
all, and he gives me the stuck in with such a mortal
motion, that it is inevitable; and on the answer, he
pays you as surely as your feet hit the ground they
step on. They say he has been fencer to the Sophy.

128

III,4,1827

Ay, but he will not now be pacified: Fabian can
scarce hold him yonder.

129

III,4,1833

I'll make the motion: stand here, make a good show
on't: this shall end without the perdition of souls.
[Aside]
Marry, I'll ride your horse as well as I ride you.
[Re-enter FABIAN and VIOLA]
[To FABIAN]
I have his horse to take up the quarrel:
I have persuaded him the youth's a devil.

130

III,4,1843

[To VIOLA] There's no remedy, sir; he will fight
with you for's oath sake: marry, he hath better
bethought him of his quarrel, and he finds that now
scarce to be worth talking of: therefore draw, for
the supportance of his vow; he protests he will not hurt you.

131

III,4,1851

Come, Sir Andrew, there's no remedy; the gentleman
will, for his honour's sake, have one bout with you;
he cannot by the duello avoid it: but he has
promised me, as he is a gentleman and a soldier, he
will not hurt you. Come on; to't.

132

III,4,1863

You, sir! why, what are you?

133

III,4,1866

Nay, if you be an undertaker, I am for you.

134

III,4,1870

I'll be with you anon.

135

III,4,1932

Come hither, knight; come hither, Fabian: we'll
whisper o'er a couplet or two of most sage saws.

136

III,4,1941

A very dishonest paltry boy, and more a coward than
a hare: his dishonesty appears in leaving his
friend here in necessity and denying him; and for
his cowardship, ask Fabian.

137

III,4,1947

Do; cuff him soundly, but never draw thy sword.

138

III,4,1950

I dare lay any money 'twill be nothing yet.

139

IV,1,1978

Hold, sir, or I'll throw your dagger o'er the house.

140

IV,1,1982

Come on, sir; hold.

141

IV,1,1988

Come, sir, I will not let you go. Come, my young
soldier, put up your iron: you are well fleshed; come on.

142

IV,1,1992

What, what? Nay, then I must have an ounce or two
of this malapert blood from you.

143

IV,1,1996

Madam!

144

IV,2,2033

Jove bless thee, master Parson.

145

IV,2,2039

To him, Sir Topas.

146

IV,2,2041

The knave counterfeits well; a good knave.

147

IV,2,2048

Well said, Master Parson.

148

IV,2,2078

My most exquisite Sir Topas!

149

IV,2,2082

To him in thine own voice, and bring me word how
thou findest him: I would we were well rid of this
knavery. If he may be conveniently delivered, I
would he were, for I am now so far in offence with
my niece that I cannot pursue with any safety this
sport to the upshot. Come by and by to my chamber.

150

V,1,2395

That's all one: has hurt me, and there's the end
on't. Sot, didst see Dick surgeon, sot?

151

V,1,2399

Then he's a rogue, and a passy measures panyn: I
hate a drunken rogue.

152

V,1,2403

Will you help? an ass-head and a coxcomb and a
knave, a thin-faced knave, a gull!

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