Speeches (Lines) for Baptista Minola
in "Taming of the Shrew"

Total: 68

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,344

Gentlemen, importune me no farther,
For how I firmly am resolv'd you know;
That is, not to bestow my youngest daughter
Before I have a husband for the elder.
If either of you both love Katherina,
Because I know you well and love you well,
Leave shall you have to court her at your pleasure.

2

I,1,370

Gentlemen, that I may soon make good
What I have said- Bianca, get you in;
And let it not displease thee, good Bianca,
For I will love thee ne'er the less, my girl.

3

I,1,387

Gentlemen, content ye; I am resolv'd.
Go in, Bianca. Exit BIANCA
And for I know she taketh most delight
In music, instruments, and poetry,
Schoolmasters will I keep within my house
Fit to instruct her youth. If you, Hortensio,
Or, Signior Gremio, you, know any such,
Prefer them hither; for to cunning men
I will be very kind, and liberal
To mine own children in good bringing-up;
And so, farewell. Katherina, you may stay;
For I have more to commune with Bianca. Exit

4

II,1,860

Why, how now, dame! Whence grows this insolence?
Bianca, stand aside- poor girl! she weeps.
[He unbinds her]
Go ply thy needle; meddle not with her.
For shame, thou hilding of a devilish spirit,
Why dost thou wrong her that did ne'er wrong thee?
When did she cross thee with a bitter word?

5

II,1,869

What, in my sight? Bianca, get thee in.

6

II,1,877

Was ever gentleman thus griev'd as I?
But who comes here?

7

II,1,881

Good morrow, neighbour Gremio.
God save you, gentlemen!

8

II,1,885

I have a daughter, sir, call'd Katherina.

9

II,1,903

Y'are welcome, sir, and he for your good sake;
But for my daughter Katherine, this I know,
She is not for your turn, the more my grief.

10

II,1,908

Mistake me not; I speak but as I find.
Whence are you, sir? What may I call your name?

11

II,1,912

I know him well; you are welcome for his sake.

12

II,1,925

A thousand thanks, Signior Gremio. Welcome, good Cambio.
[To TRANIO] But, gentle sir, methinks you walk like a stranger.
May I be so bold to know the cause of your coming?

13

II,1,942

Lucentio is your name? Of whence, I pray?

14

II,1,944

A mighty man of Pisa. By report
I know him well. You are very welcome, sir.
Take you the lute, and you the set of books;
You shall go see your pupils presently.
Holla, within!
[Enter a SERVANT]
Sirrah, lead these gentlemen
To my daughters; and tell them both
These are their tutors. Bid them use them well.
[Exit SERVANT leading HORTENSIO carrying the lute and LUCENTIO with the books]
We will go walk a little in the orchard,
And then to dinner. You are passing welcome,
And so I pray you all to think yourselves.

15

II,1,964

After my death, the one half of my lands
And, in possession, twenty thousand crowns.

16

II,1,971

Ay, when the special thing is well obtain'd,
That is, her love; for that is all in all.

17

II,1,981

Well mayst thou woo, and happy be thy speed
But be thou arm'd for some unhappy words.

18

II,1,986

How now, my friend! Why dost thou look so pale?

19

II,1,988

What, will my daughter prove a good musician?

20

II,1,991

Why, then thou canst not break her to the lute?

21

II,1,1007

Well, go with me, and be not so discomfited;
Proceed in practice with my younger daughter;
She's apt to learn, and thankful for good turns.
Signior Petruchio, will you go with us,
Or shall I send my daughter Kate to you?

22

II,1,1132

Now, Signior Petruchio, how speed you with my daughter?

23

II,1,1135

Why, how now, daughter Katherine, in your dumps?

24

II,1,1169

I know not what to say; but give me your hands.
God send you joy, Petruchio! 'Tis a match.

25

II,1,1178

Faith, gentlemen, now I play a merchant's part,
And venture madly on a desperate mart.

26

II,1,1182

The gain I seek is quiet in the match.

27

II,1,1194

Content you, gentlemen; I will compound this strife.
'Tis deeds must win the prize, and he of both
That can assure my daughter greatest dower
Shall have my Bianca's love.
Say, Signior Gremio, what can you assure her?

28

II,1,1239

I must confess your offer is the best;
And let your father make her the assurance,
She is your own. Else, you must pardon me;
If you should die before him, where's her dower?

29

II,1,1245

Well, gentlemen,
I am thus resolv'd: on Sunday next you know
My daughter Katherine is to be married;
Now, on the Sunday following shall Bianca
Be bride to you, if you make this assurance;
If not, to Signior Gremio.
And so I take my leave, and thank you both.

30

III,2,1364

[To TRANIO] Signior Lucentio, this is the 'pointed day
That Katherine and Petruchio should be married,
And yet we hear not of our son-in-law.
What will be said? What mockery will it be
To want the bridegroom when the priest attends
To speak the ceremonial rites of marriage!
What says Lucentio to this shame of ours?

31

III,2,1391

Go, girl, I cannot blame thee now to weep,
For such an injury would vex a very saint;
Much more a shrew of thy impatient humour.
[Enter BIONDELLO]
Master, master! News, and such old news as you never heard of!

32

III,2,1396

Is it new and old too? How may that be?

33

III,2,1398

Is he come?

34

III,2,1400

What then?

35

III,2,1402

When will he be here?

36

III,2,1422

Who comes with him?

37

III,2,1431

I am glad he's come, howsoe'er he comes.

38

III,2,1433

Didst thou not say he comes?

39

III,2,1435

Ay, that Petruchio came.

40

III,2,1437

Why, that's all one.

41

III,2,1445

You are welcome, sir.

42

III,2,1447

And yet you halt not.

43

III,2,1456

Why, sir, you know this is your wedding-day.
First were we sad, fearing you would not come;
Now sadder, that you come so unprovided.
Fie, doff this habit, shame to your estate,
An eye-sore to our solemn festival!

44

III,2,1474

But thus, I trust, you will not marry her.

45

III,2,1487

I'll after him and see the event of this.

46

III,2,1552

Is't possible you will away to-night?

47

III,2,1607

Nay, let them go, a couple of quiet ones.

48

III,2,1613

Neighbours and friends, though bride and bridegroom wants
For to supply the places at the table,
You know there wants no junkets at the feast.
Lucentio, you shall supply the bridegroom's place;
And let Bianca take her sister's room.

49

III,2,1619

She shall, Lucentio. Come, gentlemen, let's go.

50

IV,4,2197

Sir, pardon me in what I have to say.
Your plainness and your shortness please me well.
Right true it is your son Lucentio here
Doth love my daughter, and she loveth him,
Or both dissemble deeply their affections;
And therefore, if you say no more than this,
That like a father you will deal with him,
And pass my daughter a sufficient dower,
The match is made, and all is done-
Your son shall have my daughter with consent.

51

IV,4,2210

Not in my house, Lucentio, for you know
Pitchers have ears, and I have many servants;
Besides, old Gremio is heark'ning still,
And happily we might be interrupted.

52

IV,4,2221

It likes me well. Cambio, hie you home,
And bid Bianca make her ready straight;
And, if you will, tell what hath happened-
Lucentio's father is arriv'd in Padua,
And how she's like to be Lucentio's wife. Exit LUCENTIO

53

IV,4,2232

I follow you. Exeunt

54

V,1,2412

What, is the man lunatic?

55

V,1,2418

You mistake, sir; you mistake, sir. Pray, what do you
think is his name?

56

V,1,2433

Talk not, Signior Gremio; I say he shall go to prison.

57

V,1,2440

Away with the dotard; to the gaol with him!

58

V,1,2450

How hast thou offended?
Where is Lucentio?

59

V,1,2459

Why, tell me, is not this my Cambio?

60

V,1,2470

[To LUCENTIO] But do you hear, sir? Have you married my
daughter without asking my good will?

61

V,1,2474

And I to sound the depth of this knavery. Exit

62

V,2,2501

Padua affords this kindness, son Petruchio.

63

V,2,2529

How likes Gremio these quick-witted folks?

64

V,2,2549

O, O, Petruchio! Tranio hits you now.

65

V,2,2555

Now, in good sadness, son Petruchio,
I think thou hast the veriest shrew of all.

66

V,2,2574

Son, I'll be your half Bianca comes.

67

V,2,2604

Now, by my holidame, here comes Katherina!

68

V,2,2617

Now fair befall thee, good Petruchio!
The wager thou hast won; and I will add
Unto their losses twenty thousand crowns;
Another dowry to another daughter,
For she is chang'd, as she had never been.

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