Speeches (Lines) for Balthasar
in "Romeo and Juliet"

Total: 12

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

V,1,2823

Romeo. If I may trust the flattering truth of sleep,
My dreams presage some joyful news at hand:
My bosom's lord sits lightly in his throne;
And all this day an unaccustom'd spirit
Lifts me above the ground with cheerful thoughts.
I dreamt my lady came and found me dead—
Strange dream, that gives a dead man leave
to think!—
And breathed such life with kisses in my lips,
That I revived, and was an emperor.
Ah me! how sweet is love itself possess'd,
When but love's shadows are so rich in joy!
[Enter BALTHASAR, booted]
News from Verona!—How now, Balthasar!
Dost thou not bring me letters from the friar?
How doth my lady? Is my father well?
How fares my Juliet? that I ask again;
For nothing can be ill, if she be well.

Balthasar. Then she is well, and nothing can be ill:
Her body sleeps in Capel's monument,
And her immortal part with angels lives.
I saw her laid low in her kindred's vault,
And presently took post to tell it you:
O, pardon me for bringing these ill news,
Since you did leave it for my office, sir.


2

V,1,2833

Romeo. Is it even so? then I defy you, stars!
Thou know'st my lodging: get me ink and paper,
And hire post-horses; I will hence to-night.

Balthasar. I do beseech you, sir, have patience:
Your looks are pale and wild, and do import
Some misadventure.


3

V,1,2839

Romeo. Tush, thou art deceived:
Leave me, and do the thing I bid thee do.
Hast thou no letters to me from the friar?

Balthasar. No, my good lord.


4

V,3,2977

Romeo. Give me that mattock and the wrenching iron.
Hold, take this letter; early in the morning
See thou deliver it to my lord and father.
Give me the light: upon thy life, I charge thee,
Whate'er thou hear'st or seest, stand all aloof,
And do not interrupt me in my course.
Why I descend into this bed of death,
Is partly to behold my lady's face;
But chiefly to take thence from her dead finger
A precious ring, a ring that I must use
In dear employment: therefore hence, be gone:
But if thou, jealous, dost return to pry
In what I further shall intend to do,
By heaven, I will tear thee joint by joint
And strew this hungry churchyard with thy limbs:
The time and my intents are savage-wild,
More fierce and more inexorable far
Than empty tigers or the roaring sea.

Balthasar. I will be gone, sir, and not trouble you.


5

V,3,2980

Romeo. So shalt thou show me friendship. Take thou that:
Live, and be prosperous: and farewell, good fellow.

Balthasar. [Aside] For all this same, I'll hide me hereabout:
His looks I fear, and his intents I doubt.


6

V,3,3074

Friar Laurence. Saint Francis be my speed! how oft to-night
Have my old feet stumbled at graves! Who's there?

Balthasar. Here's one, a friend, and one that knows you well.


7

V,3,3079

Friar Laurence. Bliss be upon you! Tell me, good my friend,
What torch is yond, that vainly lends his light
To grubs and eyeless skulls? as I discern,
It burneth in the Capel's monument.

Balthasar. It doth so, holy sir; and there's my master,
One that you love.


8

V,3,3082

Friar Laurence. Who is it?

Balthasar. Romeo.


9

V,3,3084

Friar Laurence. How long hath he been there?

Balthasar. Full half an hour.


10

V,3,3086

Friar Laurence. Go with me to the vault.

Balthasar. I dare not, sir
My master knows not but I am gone hence;
And fearfully did menace me with death,
If I did stay to look on his intents.


11

V,3,3092

Friar Laurence. Stay, then; I'll go alone. Fear comes upon me:
O, much I fear some ill unlucky thing.

Balthasar. As I did sleep under this yew-tree here,
I dreamt my master and another fought,
And that my master slew him.


12

V,3,3247

Prince Escalus. We still have known thee for a holy man.
Where's Romeo's man? what can he say in this?

Balthasar. I brought my master news of Juliet's death;
And then in post he came from Mantua
To this same place, to this same monument.
This letter he early bid me give his father,
And threatened me with death, going in the vault,
I departed not and left him there.


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