Speeches (Lines) for Antony
in "Antony and Cleopatra"

Total: 202

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,19

There's beggary in the love that can be reckon'd.

2

I,1,21

Then must thou needs find out new heaven, new earth.

3

I,1,24

Grates me: the sum.

4

I,1,31

How, my love!

5

I,1,40

Let Rome in Tiber melt, and the wide arch
Of the ranged empire fall! Here is my space....

6

I,1,53

But stirr'd by Cleopatra.
Now, for the love of Love and her soft hours,...

7

I,1,59

Fie, wrangling queen!
Whom every thing becomes, to chide, to laugh,...

8

I,2,171

Against my brother Lucius?

9

I,2,177

Well, what worst?

10

I,2,179

When it concerns the fool or coward. On:
Things that are past are done with me. 'Tis thus:...

11

I,2,188

Antony, thou wouldst say,—

12

I,2,190

Speak to me home, mince not the general tongue:
Name Cleopatra as she is call'd in Rome;...

13

I,2,199

From Sicyon, ho, the news! Speak there!

14

I,2,202

Let him appear.
These strong Egyptian fetters I must break,...

15

I,2,208

Where died she?

16

I,2,213

Forbear me.
[Exit Second Messenger]...

17

I,2,226

I must with haste from hence.

18

I,2,230

I must be gone.

19

I,2,239

She is cunning past man's thought.

20

I,2,247

Would I had never seen her.

21

I,2,251

Fulvia is dead.

22

I,2,253

Fulvia is dead.

23

I,2,255

Dead.

24

I,2,266

The business she hath broached in the state
Cannot endure my absence.

25

I,2,271

No more light answers. Let our officers
Have notice what we purpose. I shall break...

26

I,3,313

I am sorry to give breathing to my purpose,—

27

I,3,317

Now, my dearest queen,—

28

I,3,319

What's the matter?

29

I,3,325

The gods best know,—

30

I,3,329

Cleopatra,—

31

I,3,335

Most sweet queen,—

32

I,3,344

How now, lady!

33

I,3,347

Hear me, queen:
The strong necessity of time commands...

34

I,3,365

She's dead, my queen:
Look here, and at thy sovereign leisure read...

35

I,3,373

Quarrel no more, but be prepared to know
The purposes I bear; which are, or cease,...

36

I,3,382

My precious queen, forbear;
And give true evidence to his love, which stands...

37

I,3,391

You'll heat my blood: no more.

38

I,3,393

Now, by my sword,—

39

I,3,398

I'll leave you, lady.

40

I,3,405

But that your royalty
Holds idleness your subject, I should take you...

41

I,3,417

Let us go. Come;
Our separation so abides, and flies,...

42

II,2,702

If we compose well here, to Parthia:
Hark, Ventidius.

43

II,2,715

'Tis spoken well.
Were we before our armies, and to fight....

44

II,2,720

Thank you.

45

II,2,722

Sit, sir.

46

II,2,724

I learn, you take things ill which are not so,
Or being, concern you not.

47

II,2,732

My being in Egypt, Caesar,
What was't to you?

48

II,2,738

How intend you, practised?

49

II,2,743

You do mistake your business; my brother never
Did urge me in his act: I did inquire it;...

50

II,2,756

Not so, not so;
I know you could not lack, I am certain on't,...

51

II,2,767

So much uncurbable, her garboils, Caesar
Made out of her impatience, which not wanted...

52

II,2,776

Sir,
He fell upon me ere admitted: then...

53

II,2,788

No,
Lepidus, let him speak:...

54

II,2,795

Neglected, rather;
And then when poison'd hours had bound me up...

55

II,2,815

Thou art a soldier only: speak no more.

56

II,2,817

You wrong this presence; therefore speak no more.

57

II,2,833

I am not married, Caesar: let me hear
Agrippa further speak.

58

II,2,850

Will Caesar speak?

59

II,2,853

What power is in Agrippa,
If I would say, 'Agrippa, be it so,'...

60

II,2,858

May I never
To this good purpose, that so fairly shows,...

61

II,2,870

I did not think to draw my sword 'gainst Pompey;
For he hath laid strange courtesies and great...

62

II,2,878

Where lies he?

63

II,2,880

What is his strength by land?

64

II,2,883

So is the fame.
Would we had spoke together! Haste we for it:...

65

II,2,890

Let us, Lepidus,
Not lack your company.

66

II,3,979

The world and my great office will sometimes
Divide me from your bosom.

67

II,3,984

Good night, sir. My Octavia,
Read not my blemishes in the world's report:...

68

II,3,992

Now, sirrah; you do wish yourself in Egypt?

69

II,3,994

If you can, your reason?

70

II,3,998

Say to me,
Whose fortunes shall rise higher, Caesar's or mine?

71

II,3,1007

Speak this no more.

72

II,3,1015

Get thee gone:
Say to Ventidius I would speak with him:...

73

II,6,1238

Thou canst not fear us, Pompey, with thy sails;
We'll speak with thee at sea: at land, thou know'st...

74

II,6,1249

Which do not be entreated to, but weigh
What it is worth embraced.

75

II,6,1268

I have heard it, Pompey;
And am well studied for a liberal thanks...

76

II,6,1273

The beds i' the east are soft; and thanks to you,
That call'd me timelier than my purpose hither;...

77

II,6,1289

That will I, Pompey.

78

II,6,1294

You have heard much.

79

II,6,1296

And fair words to them.

80

II,7,1392

[To OCTAVIUS CAESAR] Thus do they, sir: they take
the flow o' the Nile...

81

II,7,1401

Ay, Lepidus.

82

II,7,1404

They are so.

83

II,7,1420

It is shaped, sir, like itself; and it is as broad
as it hath breadth: it is just so high as it is,...

84

II,7,1426

Of it own colour too.

85

II,7,1428

'Tis so. And the tears of it are wet.

86

II,7,1430

With the health that Pompey gives him, else he is a
very epicure.

87

II,7,1444

These quick-sands, Lepidus,
Keep off them, for you sink.

88

II,7,1476

Bear him ashore. I'll pledge it for him, Pompey.

89

II,7,1490

It ripens towards it. Strike the vessels, ho?
Here is to Caesar!

90

II,7,1495

Be a child o' the time.

91

II,7,1504

Come, let's all take hands,
Till that the conquering wine hath steep'd our sense...

92

II,7,1530

And shall, sir; give's your hand.

93

III,2,1621

No further, sir.

94

III,2,1632

Make me not offended
In your distrust.

95

III,2,1635

You shall not find,
Though you be therein curious, the least cause...

96

III,2,1644

The April 's in her eyes: it is love's spring,
And these the showers to bring it on. Be cheerful.

97

III,2,1649

Her tongue will not obey her heart, nor can
Her heart inform her tongue,—the swan's...

98

III,2,1670

Come, sir, come;
I'll wrestle with you in my strength of love:...

99

III,2,1679

Farewell!

100

III,4,1752

Nay, nay, Octavia, not only that,—
That were excusable, that, and thousands more...

101

III,4,1773

Gentle Octavia,
Let your best love draw to that point, which seeks...

102

III,4,1787

When it appears to you where this begins,
Turn your displeasure that way: for our faults...

103

III,7,1963

Is it not strange, Canidius,
That from Tarentum and Brundusium...

104

III,7,1969

A good rebuke,
Which might have well becomed the best of men,...

105

III,7,1975

For that he dares us to't.

106

III,7,1988

By sea, by sea.

107

III,7,1997

I'll fight at sea.

108

III,7,1999

Our overplus of shipping will we burn;
And, with the rest full-mann'd, from the head of Actium...

109

III,7,2007

Can he be there in person? 'tis impossible;
Strange that power should be. Canidius,...

110

III,7,2020

Well, well: away!

111

III,9,2052

Set we our squadrons on yond side o' the hill,
In eye of Caesar's battle; from which place...

112

III,11,2111

Hark! the land bids me tread no more upon't;
It is ashamed to bear me! Friends, come hither:...

113

III,11,2118

I have fled myself; and have instructed cowards
To run and show their shoulders. Friends, be gone;...

114

III,11,2143

No, no, no, no, no.

115

III,11,2145

O fie, fie, fie!

116

III,11,2149

Yes, my lord, yes; he at Philippi kept
His sword e'en like a dancer; while I struck...

117

III,11,2163

I have offended reputation,
A most unnoble swerving.

118

III,11,2166

O, whither hast thou led me, Egypt? See,
How I convey my shame out of thine eyes...

119

III,11,2173

Egypt, thou knew'st too well
My heart was to thy rudder tied by the strings,...

120

III,11,2180

Now I must
To the young man send humble treaties, dodge...

121

III,11,2189

Fall not a tear, I say; one of them rates
All that is won and lost: give me a kiss;...

122

III,13,2259

Is that his answer?

123

III,13,2261

The queen shall then have courtesy, so she
Will yield us up.

124

III,13,2264

Let her know't.
To the boy Caesar send this grizzled head,...

125

III,13,2269

To him again: tell him he wears the rose
Of youth upon him; from which the world should note...

126

III,13,2354

Favours, by Jove that thunders!
What art thou, fellow?

127

III,13,2360

Approach, there! Ah, you kite! Now, gods
and devils!...

128

III,13,2370

Moon and stars!
Whip him. Were't twenty of the greatest tributaries...

129

III,13,2378

Tug him away: being whipp'd,
Bring him again: this Jack of Caesar's shall...

130

III,13,2388

You have been a boggler ever:
But when we in our viciousness grow hard—...

131

III,13,2395

I found you as a morsel cold upon
Dead Caesar's trencher; nay, you were a fragment...

132

III,13,2403

To let a fellow that will take rewards
And say 'God quit you!' be familiar with...

133

III,13,2415

Cried he? and begg'd a' pardon?

134

III,13,2417

If that thy father live, let him repent
Thou wast not made his daughter; and be thou sorry...

135

III,13,2438

Alack, our terrene moon
Is now eclipsed; and it portends alone...

136

III,13,2442

To flatter Caesar, would you mingle eyes
With one that ties his points?

137

III,13,2445

Cold-hearted toward me?

138

III,13,2456

I am satisfied.
Caesar sits down in Alexandria; where...

139

III,13,2467

I will be treble-sinew'd, hearted, breathed,
And fight maliciously: for when mine hours...

140

III,13,2478

We will yet do well.

141

III,13,2480

Do so, we'll speak to them; and to-night I'll force
The wine peep through their scars. Come on, my queen;...

142

IV,2,2517

He will not fight with me, Domitius.

143

IV,2,2519

Why should he not?

144

IV,2,2522

To-morrow, soldier,
By sea and land I'll fight: or I will live,...

145

IV,2,2527

Well said; come on.
Call forth my household servants: let's to-night...

146

IV,2,2539

And thou art honest too.
I wish I could be made so many men,...

147

IV,2,2545

Well, my good fellows, wait on me to-night:
Scant not my cups; and make as much of me...

148

IV,2,2551

Tend me to-night;
May be it is the period of your duty:...

149

IV,2,2565

Ho, ho, ho!
Now the witch take me, if I meant it thus!...

150

IV,4,2619

Eros! mine armour, Eros!

151

IV,4,2621

No, my chuck. Eros, come; mine armour, Eros!
[Enter EROS with armour]...

152

IV,4,2628

Ah, let be, let be! thou art
The armourer of my heart: false, false; this, this.

153

IV,4,2631

Well, well;
We shall thrive now. Seest thou, my good fellow?...

154

IV,4,2636

Rarely, rarely:
He that unbuckles this, till we do please...

155

IV,4,2656

'Tis well blown, lads:
This morning, like the spirit of a youth...

156

IV,5,2677

Would thou and those thy scars had once prevail'd
To make me fight at land!

157

IV,5,2683

Who's gone this morning?

158

IV,5,2688

What say'st thou?

159

IV,5,2693

Is he gone?

160

IV,5,2695

Go, Eros, send his treasure after; do it;
Detain no jot, I charge thee: write to him—...

161

IV,7,2763

Thou bleed'st apace.

162

IV,7,2766

They do retire.

163

IV,7,2775

I will reward thee
Once for thy spritely comfort, and ten-fold...

164

IV,8,2782

We have beat him to his camp: run one before,
And let the queen know of our gests. To-morrow,...

165

IV,8,2806

My nightingale,
We have beat them to their beds. What, girl!...

166

IV,8,2818

He has deserved it, were it carbuncled
Like holy Phoebus' car. Give me thy hand:...

167

IV,10,2881

Their preparation is to-day by sea;
We please them not by land.

168

IV,10,2884

I would they'ld fight i' the fire or i' the air;
We'ld fight there too. But this it is; our foot...

169

IV,12,2899

Yet they are not join'd: where yond pine
does stand,...

170

IV,12,2913

All is lost;
This foul Egyptian hath betrayed me:...

171

IV,12,2940

Vanish, or I shall give thee thy deserving,
And blemish Caesar's triumph. Let him take thee,...

172

IV,14,2977

Eros, thou yet behold'st me?

173

IV,14,2979

Sometimes we see a cloud that's dragonish;
A vapour sometime like a bear or lion,...

174

IV,14,2988

That which is now a horse, even with a thought
The rack dislimns, and makes it indistinct,...

175

IV,14,2992

My good knave Eros, now thy captain is
Even such a body: here I am Antony:...

176

IV,14,3009

Hence, saucy eunuch; peace!
She hath betray'd me and shall die the death.

177

IV,14,3019

Dead, then?

178

IV,14,3021

Unarm, Eros; the long day's task is done,
And we must sleep....

179

IV,14,3048

Since Cleopatra died,
I have lived in such dishonour, that the gods...

180

IV,14,3066

Eros,
Wouldst thou be window'd in great Rome and see...

181

IV,14,3074

Come, then; for with a wound I must be cured.
Draw that thy honest sword, which thou hast worn...

182

IV,14,3078

When I did make thee free, sworest thou not then
To do this when I bade thee? Do it at once;...

183

IV,14,3084

Lo thee!

184

IV,14,3087

Then let it do at once
The thing why thou hast drawn it.

185

IV,14,3092

'Tis said, man; and farewell.

186

IV,14,3094

Now, Eros.

187

IV,14,3098

Thrice-nobler than myself!
Thou teachest me, O valiant Eros, what...

188

IV,14,3111

I have done my work in, friends: O, make an end
Of what I have begun.

189

IV,14,3116

Let him that loves me strike me dead.

190

IV,14,3130

Art thou there, Diomed? Draw thy sword, and give me
Sufficing strokes for death.

191

IV,14,3134

When did she send thee?

192

IV,14,3136

Where is she?

193

IV,14,3145

Too late, good Diomed: call my guard, I prithee.

194

IV,14,3149

Bear me, good friends, where Cleopatra bides;
'Tis the last service that I shall command you.

195

IV,14,3154

Nay, good my fellows, do not please sharp fate
To grace it with your sorrows: bid that welcome...

196

IV,15,3182

Peace!
Not Caesar's valour hath o'erthrown Antony,...

197

IV,15,3187

I am dying, Egypt, dying; only
I here importune death awhile, until...

198

IV,15,3203

O, quick, or I am gone.

199

IV,15,3215

I am dying, Egypt, dying:
Give me some wine, and let me speak a little.

200

IV,15,3220

One word, sweet queen:
Of Caesar seek your honour, with your safety. O!

201

IV,15,3223

Gentle, hear me:
None about Caesar trust but Proculeius.

202

IV,15,3227

The miserable change now at my end
Lament nor sorrow at; but please your thoughts...

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