Speeches (Lines) for Anne Page
in "Merry Wives of Windsor"

Total: 19

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,241

Robert Shallow. Here comes fair Mistress Anne.
[Re-enter ANNE PAGE]
Would I were young for your sake, Mistress Anne!

Anne Page. The dinner is on the table; my father desires your
worships' company.


2

I,1,246

(stage directions). [Exeunt SHALLOW and SIR HUGH EVANS]

Anne Page. Will't please your worship to come in, sir?


3

I,1,248

Slender. No, I thank you, forsooth, heartily; I am very well.

Anne Page. The dinner attends you, sir.


4

I,1,257

Slender. I am not a-hungry, I thank you, forsooth. Go,
sirrah, for all you are my man, go wait upon my
cousin Shallow.
[Exit SIMPLE]
A justice of peace sometimes may be beholding to his
friend for a man. I keep but three men and a boy
yet, till my mother be dead: but what though? Yet I
live like a poor gentleman born.

Anne Page. I may not go in without your worship: they will not
sit till you come.


5

I,1,261

Slender. I' faith, I'll eat nothing; I thank you as much as
though I did.

Anne Page. I pray you, sir, walk in.


6

I,1,268

Slender. I had rather walk here, I thank you. I bruised
my shin th' other day with playing at sword and
dagger with a master of fence; three veneys for a
dish of stewed prunes; and, by my troth, I cannot
abide the smell of hot meat since. Why do your
dogs bark so? be there bears i' the town?

Anne Page. I think there are, sir; I heard them talked of.


7

I,1,272

Slender. I love the sport well but I shall as soon quarrel at
it as any man in England. You are afraid, if you see
the bear loose, are you not?

Anne Page. Ay, indeed, sir.


8

I,1,286

Slender. Mistress Anne, yourself shall go first.

Anne Page. Not I, sir; pray you, keep on.


9

III,4,1632

Fenton. I see I cannot get thy father's love;
Therefore no more turn me to him, sweet Nan.

Anne Page. Alas, how then?


10

III,4,1641

Fenton. Why, thou must be thyself.
He doth object I am too great of birth—,
And that, my state being gall'd with my expense,
I seek to heal it only by his wealth:
Besides these, other bars he lays before me,
My riots past, my wild societies;
And tells me 'tis a thing impossible
I should love thee but as a property.

Anne Page. May be he tells you true.


11

III,4,1649

Fenton. No, heaven so speed me in my time to come!
Albeit I will confess thy father's wealth
Was the first motive that I woo'd thee, Anne:
Yet, wooing thee, I found thee of more value
Than stamps in gold or sums in sealed bags;
And 'tis the very riches of thyself
That now I aim at.

Anne Page. Gentle Master Fenton,
Yet seek my father's love; still seek it, sir:
If opportunity and humblest suit
Cannot attain it, why, then,—hark you hither!


12

III,4,1663

Hostess Quickly. Hark ye; Master Slender would speak a word with you.

Anne Page. I come to him.
[Aside]
This is my father's choice.
O, what a world of vile ill-favor'd faults
Looks handsome in three hundred pounds a-year!


13

III,4,1681

Robert Shallow. He will make you a hundred and fifty pounds jointure.

Anne Page. Good Master Shallow, let him woo for himself.


14

III,4,1684

Robert Shallow. Marry, I thank you for it; I thank you for that good
comfort. She calls you, coz: I'll leave you.

Anne Page. Now, Master Slender,—


15

III,4,1686

Slender. Now, good Mistress Anne,—

Anne Page. What is your will?


16

III,4,1690

Slender. My will! 'od's heartlings, that's a pretty jest
indeed! I ne'er made my will yet, I thank heaven; I
am not such a sickly creature, I give heaven praise.

Anne Page. I mean, Master Slender, what would you with me?


17

III,4,1715

Fenton. Good Mistress Page, for that I love your daughter
In such a righteous fashion as I do,
Perforce, against all cheques, rebukes and manners,
I must advance the colours of my love
And not retire: let me have your good will.

Anne Page. Good mother, do not marry me to yond fool.


18

III,4,1718

Hostess Quickly. That's my master, master doctor.

Anne Page. Alas, I had rather be set quick i' the earth
And bowl'd to death with turnips!


19

V,5,2784

Page. My heart misgives me: here comes Master Fenton.
[Enter FENTON and ANNE PAGE]
How now, Master Fenton!

Anne Page. Pardon, good father! good my mother, pardon!


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