Speeches (Lines) for Young Lucius
in "Titus Andronicus"

Total: 11

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

III,2,1491

Titus Andronicus. How now! has sorrow made thee dote already?
Why, Marcus, no man should be mad but I.
What violent hands can she lay on her life?
Ah, wherefore dost thou urge the name of hands;
To bid AEneas tell the tale twice o'er,
How Troy was burnt and he made miserable?
O, handle not the theme, to talk of hands,
Lest we remember still that we have none.
Fie, fie, how franticly I square my talk,
As if we should forget we had no hands,
If Marcus did not name the word of hands!
Come, let's fall to; and, gentle girl, eat this:
Here is no drink! Hark, Marcus, what she says;
I can interpret all her martyr'd signs;
She says she drinks no other drink but tears,
Brew'd with her sorrow, mesh'd upon her cheeks:
Speechless complainer, I will learn thy thought;
In thy dumb action will I be as perfect
As begging hermits in their holy prayers:
Thou shalt not sigh, nor hold thy stumps to heaven,
Nor wink, nor nod, nor kneel, nor make a sign,
But I of these will wrest an alphabet
And by still practise learn to know thy meaning.

Young Lucius. Good grandsire, leave these bitter deep laments:
Make my aunt merry with some pleasing tale.


2

IV,1,1537

(stage directions). [Enter young LUCIUS, and LAVINIA running after him,]
and the boy flies from her, with books under his
arm. Then enter TITUS and MARCUS]

Young Lucius. Help, grandsire, help! my aunt Lavinia
Follows me every where, I know not why:
Good uncle Marcus, see how swift she comes.
Alas, sweet aunt, I know not what you mean.


3

IV,1,1543

Titus Andronicus. She loves thee, boy, too well to do thee harm.

Young Lucius. Ay, when my father was in Rome she did.


4

IV,1,1552

Marcus Andronicus. Canst thou not guess wherefore she plies thee thus?

Young Lucius. My lord, I know not, I, nor can I guess,
Unless some fit or frenzy do possess her:
For I have heard my grandsire say full oft,
Extremity of griefs would make men mad;
And I have read that Hecuba of Troy
Ran mad through sorrow: that made me to fear;
Although, my lord, I know my noble aunt
Loves me as dear as e'er my mother did,
And would not, but in fury, fright my youth:
Which made me down to throw my books, and fly—
Causeless, perhaps. But pardon me, sweet aunt:
And, madam, if my uncle Marcus go,
I will most willingly attend your ladyship.


5

IV,1,1580

Titus Andronicus. Lucius, what book is that she tosseth so?

Young Lucius. Grandsire, 'tis Ovid's Metamorphoses;
My mother gave it me.


6

IV,1,1651

Titus Andronicus. 'Tis sure enough, an you knew how.
But if you hunt these bear-whelps, then beware:
The dam will wake; and, if she wind you once,
She's with the lion deeply still in league,
And lulls him whilst she playeth on her back,
And when he sleeps will she do what she list.
You are a young huntsman, Marcus; let it alone;
And, come, I will go get a leaf of brass,
And with a gad of steel will write these words,
And lay it by: the angry northern wind
Will blow these sands, like Sibyl's leaves, abroad,
And where's your lesson, then? Boy, what say you?

Young Lucius. I say, my lord, that if I were a man,
Their mother's bed-chamber should not be safe
For these bad bondmen to the yoke of Rome.


7

IV,1,1656

Marcus Andronicus. Ay, that's my boy! thy father hath full oft
For his ungrateful country done the like.

Young Lucius. And, uncle, so will I, an if I live.


8

IV,1,1662

Titus Andronicus. Come, go with me into mine armoury;
Lucius, I'll fit thee; and withal, my boy,
Shalt carry from me to the empress' sons
Presents that I intend to send them both:
Come, come; thou'lt do thy message, wilt thou not?

Young Lucius. Ay, with my dagger in their bosoms, grandsire.


9

IV,2,1683

Aaron. Ay, some mad message from his mad grandfather.

Young Lucius. My lords, with all the humbleness I may,
I greet your honours from Andronicus.
[Aside]
And pray the Roman gods confound you both!


10

IV,2,1688

Demetrius. Gramercy, lovely Lucius: what's the news?

Young Lucius. [Aside] That you are both decipher'd, that's the news,
For villains mark'd with rape.—May it please you,
My grandsire, well advised, hath sent by me
The goodliest weapons of his armoury
To gratify your honourable youth,
The hope of Rome; for so he bade me say;
And so I do, and with his gifts present
Your lordships, that, whenever you have need,
You may be armed and appointed well:
And so I leave you both:
[Aside]
like bloody villains.


11

V,3,2716

Lucius. Come hither, boy; come, come, and learn of us
To melt in showers: thy grandsire loved thee well:
Many a time he danced thee on his knee,
Sung thee asleep, his loving breast thy pillow:
Many a matter hath he told to thee,
Meet and agreeing with thine infancy;
In that respect, then, like a loving child,
Shed yet some small drops from thy tender spring,
Because kind nature doth require it so:
Friends should associate friends in grief and woe:
Bid him farewell; commit him to the grave;
Do him that kindness, and take leave of him.

Young Lucius. O grandsire, grandsire! even with all my heart
Would I were dead, so you did live again!
O Lord, I cannot speak to him for weeping;
My tears will choke me, if I ope my mouth.


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